Hui Cox

Modern Guitar (MIN4224.01)

Individual training is available in jazz, modern, and classical guitar technique and repertoire, song accompaniment (finger style), improvisation, and arranging and composing for the guitar. Course material is tailored to the interests and level of the individual student.

Corequisites: Must also participate in Music Workshop (Tuesdays, 6:30 – 8pm).

Kerry Ryer-Parke

Intermediate Voice (MVO4301.04)

***Time Change***

For students of varying levels of singing ability. Vocal production and physiology will be discussed. Group warm-ups and vocalizations will incorporate exercises to develop breath control, resonance, projection, range, color, and agility. The fundamental concepts of singing will be explored in the preparation of specific song assignments. Personalization of text and emotional expression will be addressed. Students will study and perform traditional classical song literature (including Early Italian songs, 17-18th -century arias and repertoire in several languages) to strengthen and to facilitate technical growth before moving on to other contemporary styles. Students will have half-hour repertory sessions every other week with an accompanist.

Corequisites: Must also participate in Music Workshop (Tuesday, 6:30 – 8pm).

David De Simone

Landforms and Surface Processes (ES2106.01)

Rivers, wind, glaciers, and time act on sediment and rock to develop the landforms we see around us. An understanding of the surface processes that produce our regional landforms will enable you to appreciate the soils we farm, the ground water we drink, and how we manage environmental issues that impact the landscape. Our investigations will primarily be field based with observations and detailed study of many topics, including:

* Major landscape elements – origin of the form of local mountains & valleys
* River erosion & deposition – channels, floodplains, terraces & management
* Soils – formation & recognition of soil horizons
* Geoarchaeology – techniques of field study of sediment & soil for archaeology investigations to be done with local archaeologists
* Landslide & hill-slope erosion processes
* Glacier processes & products – arguably the most important agent in our landscape origins was glacial ice & we will learn to recognize glacial landforms & interpret the glacial history our region

Most weeks will consist of field study modules and there will be a single all-day Saturday field trip, tentatively scheduled for November 23.

Ronald Cohen

(In)Justice and (In)Equality (PSY4208.01)

Distinctions between justice and injustice, and between equality and inequality, underlie some of the most fundamental dimensions of social life. This course will address several questions about the relation between inequality and injustice Among them will be the following:

1. What conditions do people consider (un)just, and what factors contribute to                                these judgments?

2. What are the emotional precursors and consequences of these judgments?

3. How do people respond to situations they judge or experience as unjust?

4. What decision-making structures and social policies do people                                               consider unjust? How do they respond to these judgments?

Students will read relevant social psychological theory and research as well as related work in politics, sociology, and evolutionary approaches to social behavior.

 

Ronald Cohen

Persons, Groups, and Environments (PSY2141.01)

We spend much of our time in the presence of others, and all of our time in particular spaces. This course will examine several psychological and sociological perspectives on social interaction– how people think, feel, and act in the presence of others–and how the particular spaces in which interaction occurs affect it.

We will focus on the following issues

1. obedience, disobedience, and authority;

2. social perception and cognition;

3. conformity and resistance;

4. social interaction in social dilemmas, as exchange, and as performance

5. “doing nothing.”

Students write four papers on selected topic, one that analyzes data they have collected. Students are expected to attend all classes, and to participate regularly in discussion and in occasional course-related research (both in‐and outside of class).

Jason Middlebrook

What is Sculpture? (SCU2106.01)

How do we make it? How do we talk about it? And what does it mean? How do we make objects in space? Is gravity our friend or foe? This course invites students to investigate the fundamental principals of sculpture while encouraging exploration of classical and contemporary approaches. Sessions are intensive explorations into a variety of techniques and materials including plaster, wood, cardboard, Styrofoam and metal. There will be a strong emphasis on drawing and how drawing plays a key role in the making of sculpture. Regular slide presentations compliment individual group critiques.

Karen Danna

Time, History, and Memory (Canceled)

This course offers a critical appraisal of the concepts of time, history, and memory in the social and cognitive sciences. We will start by defining our field of research at the intersection of sociology, psychology, history, anthropology, and cognitive neuroscience. We will examine the emergence of memory as an object of study within these disciplines, and focus on the interplay of individual and collected/collective memory. We will discuss the social marking of time and temporal ordering, as well as the individual and collective processes of attention and dis-attention in conjunction with historical narrative. We will analyze the processes by which individual memories are shared by larger collectivities, and the ways in which practices, spaces, and objects become a means to articulate, legitimate, and construct personal biographies and collective identities. Additionally, we will explore issues of cultural transmission and cultural continuity. Students will write a detailed research proposal on the topic of their choosing, design/conduct original research, and complete a 5-15 page final paper. In addition, students will keep ‘concept journals’ and write short responses to assigned questions/activities throughout the course. Participation, attendance, and attention to all assigned readings are expected and essential to the evaluation process, as is evidence of critical thinking.

Karen Danna

Cognition & Society (Canceled)

Why do we stomp on cockroaches yet marvel at butterflies? Why is it ok (at least in this country) to roast a deer, but not a dog, swallow a snail, but not a slug? What guidelines do “thought communities” rely upon to decide when a person’s class or race or age or gender or sexuality is – or is not – morally or legally relevant? How are personal memories and historical narratives connected to the politics of identity? Who decides, and how, when a war is ‘just’ and when it is not? Cognition & Society addresses these and other questions pertaining to the sociomental organization of social life. Drawing upon a number of major sociological, anthropological, and psychological traditions (social psychology, sociology of knowledge, symbolic interactionism, symbolic anthropology, phenomenology, semiotics, cognitive anthropology, and cognitive psychology), this course examines relations between the social and the mental within the specific contexts of perceiving, attending, remembering, reasoning, classifying, framing, time reckoning, and assigning meaning. It is designed to prepare students to do theoretically informed empirical studies of the social dimensions of our thinking. Students will write 3 research papers, as well as 10 reading responses, over the course of the semester, and are expected to attend all class sessions and complete all assigned readings. Evaluation will be based on participation and the demonstration (through written work and oral discussion) of analytical growth.

David Edelman

Sensation and Movement in the Ocean (Canceled)

How do marine animals negotiate the challenges of a complex, ever changing, and often dangerous environment? How can we make sense of the rich repertoires of sensory and motor adaptations that are found among the diverse multi-cellular creatures that have evolved in the oceans over more than half a billion years? Finally, what kinds of nervous system innovations coincided with this sensory and motor efflorescence? In this course, we will explore the anatomical and physiological aspects of marine sensory and motor organs, with particular emphasis on their neural substrates. I’ll highlight key sensory and motor leitmotifs that are recurrent in marine bodyplans (e.g., aspects of vision, hearing, chemoreception, touch, locomotion, etc.) and distinguish between homologous versus analogous structures and functions in sensory and motor systems across different marine phyla.

In the lab for this course, we will dissect and compare a variety of sensory and motor organs across a number of different marine invertebrates (e.g., decapod shrimp, cephalopod molluscs) and vertebrates (e.g., bony fish). We will also perform simple psychophysical experiments designed to assess the sensory and motor capabilities of animals housed in the lab.

Corequisites: Student must also register for lab, BIO4125.

David Edelman
David Edelman

Fundamentals of Neuroscience: A Beginner’s Guide (BIO2212.01)

What are the biological bases of perceptions, action, movement and thought? Why and how do we remember (or forget) our everyday experiences? Why are playing the violin, performing dance, or simply throwing a ball or frisbee so deliberative and effortful when we are first learning these skills, yet so free of thought and automatic after years of training and experience? How did the human brain – a two and a half pound mass of gelatinous tissue – give rise to Fitzgerald’s Gatsby and his profligate ways and ultimate disillusionment, the brooding Southern families of Faulkner’s Absalom Absalom, the beautiful symmetry of Bach’s partita, the fraught soundscapes of Mahler, or the jarring fragmentation of Picasso’s cubist works? To answer this last question, we need to confront the more fundamental problems posed by the first three questions. In this course, we’ll explore the multifarious roles of the nervous system as: 1.) the substrate for internal representations of the world; 2.) the central organizer and director of behavior; and 3.) the forge of all that is creative in human pursuits. We’ll approach the nervous system from both the bottom-up (i.e., neuronal function) and top-down (i.e., how a visual scene is created; neurological and psychiatric pathologies), as well as explore the manner in which brain structures are built during development and elaborated upon over the course of evolution.

Donald Sherefkin; Dan Hofstadter

Drawing Intensive Rome – FWT 2014 (AH4309.01)

Dan Hofstadter and Donald Sherefkin will be offering a three week drawing intensive in Rome, Italy for FWT 2014.  The focus of the studio will be the art and architecture of Rome. Mornings will be spent doing on-site sketching, and afternoon studio sessions will be organized around specific workshops.

The cost of the class is still being calculated, but will be around $2,726. This does not include airfare or meals in Rome. This covers airport transfers, 20 nights in an apartment shared with classmates, trips to Tivoli and Ostia, plus the use of an architecture studio at the University of Arkansas Rome Center. There is a Wi-Fi in the studio. It also covers up to $200 for entry fees.

This course will be offered over FWT. Interested students should register for this course in spring 2013; credits earned will count towards the credit requirements for spring 2014. Contact Donald Sherefkin for course details. (Note: Registered students who are eligible will receive a partial waiver for the number of hours normally required during FWT. Please contact the FWT Office for details.)

Terry Creach

Movement Practice: Yoga, Gymnastics and Dance (DAN2213.01)

For students interested in “moving-through” or flowing yoga asanas informed by attention to alignment, along with basic gymnastic floor-exercise skills that deal with momentum and more complex coordinated actions. We will warm-up with the stretching/strengthening poses and sequences from yoga and apply the alignment principles to rolls, handstands, and cartwheels in order to build gymnastic dance sequences.

This course will be offered the second seven weeks of term.

Guy Snover

Introduction To Rhino 3-D Modeling (VA2113.01)

Rhino 3D Modeling is a foundation course in Rhinoceros modeling software. Rhinoceros, used by architects, artists, and designers, is now standard software for anyone modeling three-dimensional form.  As an accurate and flexible tool, Rhino provides users with workflows for solid modeling, polygonal modeling, and organic NURBS surface modeling. This course covers a broad range of modeling techniques and lays a strong foundation for continued work in 3D modeling. Students complete predefined modeling tasks, as well as create original works of their own design. The term will culminate with a final project that is fully modeled in Rhino and fabricated using laser cutting and 3D printing.

David Bond

Nature in the Americas (ANT4215.01)

Nature has played a key role in shaping social life in the Americas. Yet nature refuses easy definition. This course reflects on the many presences of nature and their uses across the Americas. In this course, we will learn how the agency of germs, cattle, and sugar shaped the formation of European conceit, how some of the earliest capitalistic ventures were built atop the cultivated abundance of (decimated) indigenous communities, how local entanglements of village life in the Amazon dispute any overarching distinction of what is human and what is nature, and how the state and capital invest heavily in maintaining such distinctions of human and nature at the frontiers of power and profit. The overarching premise of this course is straightforward: the unfolding history of life itself in the Americas has indelibly shaped much of what counts as Nature today and much of what makes the Americas a distinct region.

Donald Sherefkin

Maps, Diagrams and Projections (ARC2113.01)

This is an introductory drawing workshop for students interested in architecture. There are at least four categories of drawing that will be developed. The first will concentrate on direct observation – form, light, shadow, texture, color. The second will explore analytical diagramming.  We will investigate methods of organizing and mapping visual information.The third is based on the conventions of projection, including descriptive geometry (plan, section and elevation) and constructed perspectives. The fourth will be based on speculative, imaginary or visionary drawings. In each class, there will be a workshop, followed by a drawing assignment.  In addition, students will maintain visual journal. Associated Readings will explore the history of architectural drawing.

This course can serve as a prerequisite for Architecture I – Elements being offered in Spring 2014.

David Bond

The Anthropology of Science and Technology (ANT2119.01)

This course introduces students to science and technology studies. Studying the laboratory as a foreign culture, technology as a built argument, and objectivity as a disembodied vision, this course approaches science as a history of the present; that is, as an unfolding force that is actively shaping the texture and significance of social life in the present. Readings will describe how scientific practice, whether in the isolation of genetics or the order of statistics, is an effective social author in its own right. Several questions will guide our inquiries: What kind of society is enacted in scientific practice and deployed technologies? Who can thrive and who is thwarted within such societies? What role should expertise play in a democracy? Topics include: the separation of the natural from the social, how science impinges on public policy (and vice versa), formatting the economy, modeling climate change, and techno-science and democracy.

Julie Last

Song Production (MSR4362.01)

***Time Change***

How does a song idea make its way from a composer’s imagination to a CD that plays on your home stereo or computer? How do choices regarding instrumentation, song structure, sonic identity, and musical performance bring a song to life? In what ways do those choices affect how a piece of music is experienced? Throughout this course we’ll be thinking about those questions as we explore the various stages of the song production process and the tools used to record a piece of popular music. Starting with one original song, you will be creating arrangements, developing listening skills, recording instruments, learning to shape performances, and studying the work of successful record producers.

Susan Sgorbati; Bruce Williamson

Improvisation Ensemble for Musicians & Dancers (DAN4357.01)

***Time Change***

This advanced course focuses on work in the performance of improvisation. For dancers, special attention is given to the development of individual movement vocabularies, physical contact and interaction, and the exploration of forms and structures.

For musicians, special attention is given to creating rhythms and sonorities which can then be manipulated and developed while interacting with dancers in the moment.

Dancers are expected to have experience with improvisation in performance and are asked to develop a structure for the group. Musicians should have basic skills on their instrument and be able create and convey a sense of form to other musicians in an efficient way.

Both dancers and musicians will meet together on Wednesdays.

Corequisites: For dancers, Dance or Drama lab assignment.

Bruce Williamson; Susan Sgorbati

Improvisation Ensemble for Musicians & Dancers (MPF4233.01)

***Time Change***

This advanced-level course focuses on work in the performance of improvisation. For dancers, special attention is given to the development of individual movement vocabularies, physical contact and interaction, and the exploration of forms and structures.

For musicians, special attention is given to creating rhythms and sonorities which can then be manipulated and developed while interacting with dancers in the moment.

Dancers are expected to have experience with improvisation in performance and are asked to develop a structure for the group. Musicians should have basic skills on their instrument and be able create and convey a sense of form to other musicians in an efficient way.

Both dancers and musicians will meet together on Wednesdays.

Bruce Williamson

Hearing Herbie (MPF4242.01)

*** Time Change ***

This will be a performance-oriented ensemble that will focus on the songs of jazz keyboardist Herbie Hancock. We will select examples from the various styles he explored during his long and productive career: soul-jazz songs such as ‘Watermelon Man’ & ‘Cantaloupe Island’, modal-jazz songs such as ‘Maiden Voyage’ (and others he wrote while playing with Miles Davis in the mid-60s), songs written for larger ensembles (from albums ‘Speak Like A Child’, ‘The Prisoner’ & ‘Mwandishi’), funk-jazz classics such as ‘Chameleon’ plus songs from his numerous Grammy-winning recordings (such as ‘River: The Joni Letters’).

Julie Last

The Art of Acoustic Recording (MSR4052.01)

Building on the fundamentals developed in MSR2152 Beginning Workshop in Recording, this class will focus on specific techniques for creating quality recordings of a wide variety of instruments. We will develop an understanding of the sonic and musical properties that make each instrument unique as well as techniques for working with live instrumentalists and vocalists in the studio. Students will be recording and mixing multi-track sessions and will be encouraged to work collaboratively with others on group assignments. We will do critical listening to a variety of types of recorded music and apply our observations to your own projects.

Corequisites: Must participate in Music Workshop (Tuesdays, 6:30 – 8pm).

Kerry Ryer-Parke

Intermediate Voice (MVO4301.03)

For students of varying levels of singing ability. Vocal production and physiology will be discussed. Group warm-ups and vocalizations will incorporate exercises to develop breath control, resonance, projection, range, color, and agility. The fundamental concepts of singing will be explored in the preparation of specific song assignments. Personalization of text and emotional expression will be addressed. Students will study and perform traditional classical song literature (including Early Italian songs, 17-18th -century arias and repertoire in several languages) to strengthen and to facilitate technical growth before moving on to other contemporary styles. Students will have half-hour repertory sessions every other week with an accompanist.

Corequisites: Must also participate in Music Workshop (Tuesday, 6:30 – 8pm).

Rachel Rosales

Intermediate Voice (MVO4301.02)

For students of varying levels of singing ability. Vocal production and physiology will be discussed. Group warm-ups and vocalizations will incorporate exercises to develop breath control, resonance, projection, range, color, and agility. The fundamental concepts of singing will be explored in the preparation of specific song assignments. Personalization of text and emotional expression will be addressed. Students will study and perform traditional classical song literature (including Early Italian songs, 17-18th -century arias and repertoire in several languages) to strengthen and to facilitate technical growth before moving on to other contemporary styles. Students will have half-hour repertory sessions every other week with an accompanist.

Corequisites: Must also participate in Music Workshop (Tuesday, 6:30 – 8pm).

Rachel Rosales

Intermediate Voice (MVO4301.01)

For students of varying levels of singing ability. Vocal production and physiology will be discussed. Group warm-ups and vocalizations will incorporate exercises to develop breath control, resonance, projection, range, color, and agility. The fundamental concepts of singing will be explored in the preparation of specific song assignments. Personalization of text and emotional expression will be addressed. Students will study and perform traditional classical song literature (including Early Italian songs, 17-18th -century arias and repertoire in several languages) to strengthen and to facilitate technical growth before moving on to other contemporary styles. Students will have half-hour repertory sessions every other week with an accompanist.

Corequisites: Must also participate in Music Workshop (Tuesday, 6:30 – 8pm).

 

Alison Dennis

Social Marketing (MOD2147.04)

The everyday choices we make as citizens and consumers directly impact human and environmental health. From the food we eat to the clothing we wear, each choice has upstream and downstream impacts. The more global our society becomes, the more challenging it is to understand the impacts of our choices and to make informed decisions. This three-week module will explore social marketing as a powerful tool for raising public awareness, changing public behavior and catalyzing social movements. Participants will have the opportunity to research an issue of interest as individuals or as teams and to develop a social marketing campaign employing a wide range of media. All writers, actors, dancers, filmmakers, photographers, social scientists, activists and upstarts welcome.

This module will be held Monday, November 18 – Monday, December 9. Class will not be held on Thursday, November 28 due to Thanksgiving break.

Alison Dennis

Business, Ethics, & Society (MOD2146.03)

What are the relationships between economic, social and ecological prosperity? Is the creation of a just, equitable, humane and sustainable society possible given today’s economic models and market dynamics? What are our obligations as individuals to contribute to setting the economic agenda for our society? What new approaches and models are redefining the relationship between business and society? Are these new models and approaches scale-able  This three-week module will address the rapidly changing relationship between business, ethics, and society and explore past, present and future models for public action.

This module will be held Thursday, October 24 – Thursday, November 14. No class will be held on Thursday, October 31, due to a plan day.

Alison Dennis

Business Incubator (MOD2145.02)

Do you imagine someday starting your own venture? Do you have an idea for a business, organization or social enterprise? Are you a working artist, musician or entrepreneur? Are you considering a self-employed career path? Group sessions and one-on-one coaching will help entrepreneurs develop and hone practical plans to support, strengthen and forward their business ideas. Students can use this module to forward existing businesses and enterprises, to develop a new business or to practice the planning process by forwarding a hypothetical concept.

This module will be held Monday, September 30 – Thursday, October 17.

Alison Dennis

Social Innovation & Entrepreneurship: Idea to Launch (MOD2144.01)

Calling all innovators, catalysts and designers: this three-week module is for students interested in the process of developing creative solutions and ventures in response to societal needs. Participants are invited, as individuals or teams, to enter the workshop with a specific social or environmental issue or area of interest, from capus or community issues to national and global challenges. Through the workshop participants will go through the creative process of identifying a specific societal need and developing a solution from idea to launch. Participants will conduct primary research to understand societal needs, employ a range of strategic planning and design tools and explore a spectrum of nonprofit, for-profit and hybrid organizational models. At the completion of the model, participants will present their plans to a panel of practitioners and get feedback. The workshop can be used as a way to gain experience by forwarding a hypothetical project or as a launch pad to develop a real venture.

This module will be held Thursday, September 5 – Monday, September 23.

Maria Elmer
Elizabeth Sherman; Janet Foley

Field Course in Coral Reef Science (BIO4239.01)

The biodiversity of coral reefs has been declining rapidly in the last 20 years due in large part to human activities. In this field course students will have an opportunity to confront this problem directly and contribute to our understanding of reef biodiversity. This course will take place on the island of Grand Cayman, British West Indies (Latitude 18 23′ N, Longitude 81 24′ W) for one week during January or February of 2014. Students will have an opportunity to become certified scuba divers and gain first hand experience with the taxonomy, identification and characteristics of the animals that live in coral reefs as they dive and snorkel in the extraordinary fringing reefs of Grand Cayman. Students will also engage in underwater research and contribute fish diversity data to an international repository for such data.

This course will be offered over FWT (January 4 – February 11, 2014). Interested students should register for this course in spring 2013; credits earned will count towards the credit requirements for spring 2014. Registered students will receive a partial waiver for the number of hours normally required during FWT, and will be expected to work a minimum of 160 hours (at least 140 at a primary site) during FWT 2014.

Anthony Titus

Twisted Siblings: Relationships Between Painting and Architecture (ARC4215.01)

Architecture and painting are two of the oldest forms of societal expression and have been historically linked in complex and dynamic ways. In the 20th century, the movements of Cubism, Futurism, Neo-Plasticism, and Constructivism exemplified vigorous relationships between painting and architecture. The course seeks to create new connections between the two disciplines in the 21st century. We will begin by examining the spatial principles of paintings by a select group of modern and contemporary artists. Each student will select a painting, and analyze it through drawing, modeling, and writing. In addition to making, students will be asked to research ideas and projects of related interest. The results of the initial investigations will be synthesized in a series of small-scale pavilion spaces. The final deliverables will consist of a model, drawings, photographs and a related text.

Monica Youn

Reading and Writing Poetry: The Poet’s Toolkit (LIT4251.01)

In this course, students will hone and sharpen their poetic craft through an extensive focus on the materials and techniques of their art form. Starting from the basic building block of the poem – the individual word or sound, students will engage in a series of exercises that are designed to deepen their appreciation of structure, craft, and form. We will devote special attention to the ways in which poetry can participate in the characteristic techniques of other artists whose works serve as exemplars for certain formal strategies. In addition to weekly creative writing assignments, students will write critical response papers, and will prepare a final portfolio of poems at the end of the term.

Corequisites: Students are required to attend Literature Evenings (Wednesdays, 7 – 8pm).

Monica Youn

Modernist Monuments: Yeats, Pound and Eliot (LIT4218.01)

This course will provide an in-depth exploration of poetry and critical work of three founding figures of English-language modernist literature: William Butler Yeats, Ezra Pound, and T.S. Eliot. We will also, time permitting, consider works by other major authors of the modernist movement, including Thomas Hardy, W.H. Auden and Gertrude Stein. At its inception, the modernist movement seemed to promise “a way of controlling, of ordering, of giving shape and a significance to the immense panorama of futility and anarchy which is contemporary history” (T.S.Eliot). What became of this initial impulse as the modernist movement continued to mature? Students will write critical papers and participate in weekly close readings of key texts.

Allen Shawn

Beginning Composing (MCO4120.01)

**Course Code Change**

This class explores and reviews notation and the rudiments of music through the act of composing small pieces for a variety of instruments. It is intended for students who have taken instrumental lessons for a few years or more and who can read music in at least one clef. It is meant for those who have never imagined composing music as well as for those who have already begun writing music. We will take a hands-on approach to learning about such matters as intervals, modes, key signatures, and the fundamentals of tonal harmony through using these musical elements creatively. The students are also encouraged to produce original creative work that is not tied to learning any particular materials, but simply reflect the student’s imagination and instincts. Students are requested to show work during the term at Music Workshop. Students must have had a few or more years of instrumental study, and the ability to read music in at least one clef.

 

Donald Sherefkin

100 Drawings (ARC4118.01)

**Time Change**

Using a fixed format of 9″ x 9″ paper, we will do a drawing each day of the term in a process which will parallel Georges Perec’s Life: A User’s Manual. Each drawing will have a set of constraints from which the student must extrapolate an image. A narrative will gradually be built through the accumulation of evidence. A variety of media, techniques and strategies will be explored, as well as strategies of invention, and methodologies of ordering.

Kitty Brazelton

Basso Continuo and You (MTH2110.01)

*** Time Change ***

The practice of putting chords over a bass line and a melody on top – sound familiar? – exploded in the Early Baroque and we haven’t been the same since. Listening changed. Ensembles changed. And a new era of functional harmony began. Learn about figured bass, chordal voicing and interpretation, the Spanish rhythmic ostinati which fueled popular dances from the New World. We’ll dig up old bass line treasure, sight-sing, analyze, improvise and play. Bring your voice or an instrument, your brain, your ears, your pencil and some music paper. Students must be able to read and write music, and have some instrumental or vocal proficiency. The evening class will be a playing session, implementing the theory.

Elizabeth White

Exploring the White Cube: A New York Intensive (VA4125.01)

This class will meet weekly to explore contemporary art exhibitions in New York. We will visit commercial galleries and non-profit art spaces in Midtown, Chelsea, the Lower East Side, and Brooklyn, as well as major museums. Relevant readings will be assigned and short response papers will be required. Students will be responsible for their own expenses, including transportation and museum admissions, however efforts will be made to keep admission costs at a minimum. Additional exhibitions, events, and performances will be recommended.

This course will be offered over FWT (January 2 – February 14, 2014). Interested students should register for this course in spring 2013; credits earned will count towards the credit requirements for spring 2014. Registered students will receive a partial waiver for the number of hours normally required during FWT, and will be expected to work a minimum of 126 hours at a primary site during FWT 2014.

John Gould

Through Syntax to Style: A Grammar of Writing (LIT2169.01)

“Syntax” is the aspect of grammar concerned with the relationships of words in a language, with how they fit together to create meaning.  By exploring various English syntactical structures, we will discover a variety of ways to combine the same words to say slightly different things.  The course will rely heavily on the linguistic work of Noam Chomsky.  We will write a number of short, pithy essays in which syntax and punctuation will make a great difference.  The ability to control syntax is critical for all writing, both expository and, more importantly, creative.

This course will be offered the first seven weeks of term.

Kerry Ryer-Parke

Vocal Chamber Ensemble (MVO4126.01)

So you have a voice. What will you say with it? Some topics are too profound for one voice alone- we need to sing with others, to become more than a sum of our parts. This ensemble is for confident singers interested in becoming a vital member of a musical team, performing sacred and secular works old and new, a capella and accompanied, from varied traditions and cultures. Music will be chosen for its capacity to challenge, inspire, and transcend the everyday. Ensemble members will bring varied abilities to the ensemble, but all will gain skills in vocal technique, listening, blend, intonation, memorization, sight-reading, phrasing, and interpretation while preparing music for performance later in the term.

Kerry Ryer-Parke

Advanced Voice (MVO4401.02)

Advanced study of vocal technique and the interpretation of the vocal repertoire, designed for advanced students who have music as a plan concentration and to assist graduating seniors with preparation for senior recitals. Students are required to study and to perform a varied spectrum of vocal repertory for performance and as preparation for further study or graduate school. A class maximum of five voice students will meet for one-hour individual session/coachings with the instructor each week (to be scheduled with the instructor). Students will also have an individual half-hour session with a pianist each week to work on repertory.

Corequisites: Must also participate in Music Workshop (Tuesday, 6:30 – 8pm).

Theresa Morris

Philosophy of Art and Language (PHI4215.01)

This course in aesthetics begins with the Ancient Greeks and then follows a predominantly Continental trajectory to contemporary philosophers of aesthetics.  While we will investigate thinkers writing on art, music, and drama, our eventual focus will be the philosophy of language and literature, beginning with Plato’s Phaedrus and including selections from Heidegger, Maurice Blanchot, Luce Irigaray, Julia Kristeva, and Derrida, among others.

Theresa Morris

Ancient Philosophy (PHI2135.01)

This course is an introduction to Ancient Philosophy.  We will study the ideas and works of the Presocratics, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, and the Stoic philosopher, Epictetus. Using the course texts, in-class writing practices, class discussion, and group work students will gain familiarity with philosophical ideas from ancient Greek philosophy, some of which are complex and abstract. Many of these ideas have influenced subsequent ages, including ours. Topics include the nature of justice, the soul, death, friendship and love, and early ideas concerning physics and nature.

John Kirk

Traditional Music Ensemble (MPF4221.01)

We will study and perform from the string band traditions of rural America. Nova Scotia, Quebecois, Irish, New England, Scandinavian, African American, dance, and ballad traditions will also be experienced with listening, practice (weekly group rehearsals outside of class), and performing components. Emphasis on ensemble intuition, playing by ear, and lifetime personal music making skills (transposition, harmonizing, etc.). Previous playing experience required on one or more of the following instruments: violin, guitar, banjo, mandolin, bass accordion, concertina, penny whistle, flute, bodhran, harp, ukulele, or piano.

Colin Brant

Markmaking and Representation (DRW2149.02)

The fundamentals of drawing are the basic tools for this investigation into seeing and translation. Using simple methods and means, the practice of drawing is approached from both traditional and experimental directions. The focus of this inquiry is on drawing from observation, broadly defined. In class drawing sessions are complemented by independent, outside of class work and occasional assigned readings. The goals of the course include the development of individual confidence in observational drawing skills, a working knowledge of the rich histories and contemporary concerns of drawing, and a practical basis for further inquiry into all the visual arts. Previous drawing experience may be helpful, but is not required of students enrolling in this course.

Noelle Rouxel-Cubberly

Créatrices (FRE4721.01)

Their films, their books, their work, their lives have marked and shaped other lives. This course will focus on selected works of French and francophone women creators – authors, painters, scientists, stand-up comedians, entrepreneurs. We will explore a variety of genres and forms of expressions (essays, novels, films, Skype and live interviews, stand-up acts, etc.).  Readings include excerpts from La Princesse de Clèves (Madame de Lafayette, 1678), Histoire de ma vie  (George Sand, 1855), Le deuxième sexe (Simone de Beauvoir, 1949), Rêves de femmes: une enfance au harem (Mernissi, 1996), and the book Kiffe kiffe demain (Guène 2006).  Course material also includes three films: Rue Cases-Nègres (Palcy 1983), Les silences du palais (Tlatli, 1994), Inch’Allah dimanche  (Benguigui, 2008), paintings by Berthe Morisot, scientist Marie Curie’s biographical texts, skits by humorists Florence Foresti and Valérie Lemercier. Students will also learn from their live discussions with contemporary French women, Maboula Soumahoro, creator of the Black History Month in France, and entrepreneur Samia Ait-Hellal whose life and work reflect contemporary France. Written assignments and oral presentations will help students improve their reading, speaking and writing skills in French. Students will also exchange with native speakers on a conversation exchange platform. Advanced level. Conducted in French.

 

Noelle Rouxel-Cubberly

The Film Trailer Project (FRE4119.01)

In this course, French films are used as linguistic and cultural textbooks. While honing their language skills (listening, reading, speaking and writing), students will focus on selected cultural topics (food, clothes, history, gestures, etc.). Students will create film trailers that reflect their understanding  of the French language and cultural realities. Films include L’argent de poche (Truffaut, 1976), Rue Cases-Nègres (Palcy, 1983), Au revoir les enfants (Malle,1987), Chocolat (Denis 1988), Le dîner de cons (Veber, 1998), Les glaneurs et la glaneuse (Varda 2000), Monsieur Ibrahim et les fleurs du Coran (Dupeyron, 2003), Comme une image (Jaoui 2004), and Caché (Haneke 2005). A common website and in-class presentations will allow students to share and discuss their findings. Conversation exchanges with native speakers will enrich this exploration of these representations of the French-speaking world. Conducted in French.

Stephen Shapiro

Petronius (FLE4325.01)

In this course we will read the Satyricon of Petronius, an experimental text that challenges modern notions of genre, serving up satire, philosophy, and literary criticism all within the context of a road trip through the ancient world. Weekly Latin readings will allow us to review and deepen an understanding of Latin grammatical structures and vocabulary, while readings in contemporary scholarship will focus our attention on critical questions at play in this unique Menippean satire. Weekly translations and linguistic analyses, two papers, and a final project. Intermediate/advanced level.

Stephen Shapiro

French America (FRE4221.01)

This course will examine French representations of America in literature, political philosophy, and film. We will focus on the paradoxes inherent in the French fascination with America as well as how America has served as a figure for the expression of French anxieties about modernity and a changing world. Beginning with Montaigne, Buffon, and Tocqueville we will analyze the association of America with an idealized simplicity; later we will study America as a symbol of dehumanizing industrialization and modernity in the work of Céline and Duhamel. The work of Stéphane Bouquet and Bernard-Henri Lévy will offer a view of contemporary France’s ever-changing fascination with America. Intermediate-high level.

Stephen Shapiro

Insider Perspectives on the French Speaking World (FRE2103.01)

Viewed from the outside, the French-speaking world offers enticing images of beauty, pleasure, and freedom. From the inside, however, it is a complicated, often contradictory world where implicit codes and values shape the most basic aspects of daily life. This course will give you an insider’s perspective on a cultural and communicative system whose ideas, customs, and belief systems are surprisingly different from your own. Together, we will examine how daily life and activities (friendship and family relationships, housing, leisure, work, and food culture) reflect culturally specific ideologies and values. Emphasis will be placed on developing ease, fluency, and sophistication in oral and written expression. Designed for students with no previous study of French, this class will revolve around authentic materials from the Francophone world (video, music, advertisements, literary texts). Introductory level. Conducted in French.

Kate Purdie

Introduction to Video (FV2101.02)

This course teaches techniques fundamental to the craft of moving image creation, including cinematography, lighting, sound recording, and editing. It also provides a conceptual framework for video as an art medium. Students will build individual technical skills while developing an aesthetic vocabulary based on medium-specific audiovisual qualities. Throughout the term we will screen a broad range of examples of film and video works of genres both familiar and perhaps alien. We will address ideas and techniques spanning storytelling and nonnarrative approaches, fiction and nonfiction, linear and nonlinear structures (such as web-based projects), abstraction and representation. We’ll spend equal time on the technical skills and the creative possibilities of sound and image editing.

Warren Cockerham

Video Installation (FV2127.01)

This studio course will survey moving image work that is created for experiences outside of a typical cinematic setting. Students will explore the expanded possibilities of video in gallery and site-specific installations. Although this course will be mostly based on the technical practice of video installation, students will also be required to complete readings and participate in discussions on the historical and theoretical practice of expanded cinema. In addition to one in-class field trip, students will also be required to visit and write about one video installation outside of class time.

This course will be offered the first seven weeks of term.

Camille Guthrie

The Scriptorium: Critical Theories (LIT2227.01)

Our scriptorium, a “place for writing,” will function as a class for beginning writers for those students who want to improve their essay skills. We will read to write and write to read, following the originator of the form, Montaigne. Much of our time will be occupied with writing probatively, as essai means “trial” or “attempt.” This particular class will examine model examples of theory and criticism, with a focus on cultural studies and popular culture. We will practice various essay structures with the aim of developing persuasive, well-supported thesis; in addition, we will revise collaboratively and study grammar. Our aim is to learn to write more genuinely with complexity, imagination, and accuracy. Authors may include the following: Barthes, Benjamin, Foucault, Haraway, Berger, Sontag, Mulvey, Said, Freud, Tompkins, de Beauvoir, Wilde, Baudelaire, Baudrillard, Kosofsky, Sedgwick, Hooks, and Butler.

Andrew Spence

Critical Response in Painting (PAI4309.01)

In order to make successful work, artists must know when to follow their instincts, take risks or try new approaches toward developing ideas. Self-confidence and the ability to be critical of one’s own work are the tools that come with experience.

This course is intended to offer students feedback on their work as it develops. Their work is addressed within the context of individual development and contemporary issues in painting. Critical response to student work is the primary emphasis of this class. Through visual dialogue, students become more adept at understanding their work objectively and gain confidence in their art-making. Students are expected to make visual and written presentations as well as participate in class discussions.

All student work is to be completed outside of class time in assigned studios.

Andrew Spence

Art in America Since WWII (AH2286.01)

After WWII, artists in U. S. cities played a major role in the transformation of contemporary art from Modernism to Post Modernism and the present.  As a survey, this course looks at several of these artists’ works and their connections to important movements such as Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art, and the proliferation of later movements including Photo Realism, Minimalism, Feminist Art, Process Art, Earth Art, New Image Painting, Neo Expressionism, East Village Art, Identity Art and more.  New York City as one of the world-class art centers is used as a focus for retracing these developments in order to gain a closer understanding and appreciation.  Slide/digital presentations, weekly readings, student presentations and group discussions are the format of this class.

Maria Elmer
Polly van der Linde
Yoshiko Sato
Robin Kemkes

Political Economy of the Environment (PEC4215.01)

How do we best manage the world’s ecosystems to support our economy, livelihoods and well-being? This course will use the tragedy of the commons as a framework to examine pressing socio-ecological dilemmas such as climate change, declining ocean fisheries, water pollution and biodiversity loss. We will explore a variety of policies, programs and governance structures for overcoming the problem of collective action and assess whether they meet the goals of efficiency, equity, sustainability and safety. Concepts such as public goods, common pool resources, scale, definitions of sustainability and decision-making under uncertainty will be covered. Furthermore, different types of power influence environmental decision-making and outcomes. Who benefits and who loses from these decisions? We will discuss how environmental justice populations are impacted in the U.S. and globally using examples of exposure to toxics, disaster vulnerability and food security. Throughout the course students will be asked to analyze real-world examples of socio-ecological dilemmas in class discussions and in small groups. For the final project, students will pair up and choose a topic of interest – either a local issue, a current event or a global concern. Each group will share their analysis of the topic with the class through a final presentation.

Robin Kemkes

Microeconomics (PEC2250.01)

Economics is the study of how individuals and societies allocate scarce resources – labor, natural resources, capital – toward competing ends to sustain life and enhance its quality. This course develops the basic tools of microeconomic analysis and advances critical thinking around the dominant neoclassical approach to economic problem solving. We begin with a comparison of how the main questions of economics are considered across economic theories, by capitalism and throughout the history of economics. We then discuss how mathematical models were developed to explain market behavior. Most of the course will be dedicated to microeconomic analysis using the neoclassical model, including theories of supply and demand, government action in markets and market failures. Throughout, we will apply concepts to public policy issues such as inequality, unemployment and climate change. Students will be expected to contribute to classroom discussion by periodically bringing in relevant news articles. Grades will be based on classroom participation, two short writing assignments (2-3 pages) and take-home problem sets. Basic skills in algebra are required.

Kirk Jackson

Faculty Performance Production: Great Expectations (DRA4575.01)

Long before the feel-good self-help industry gave us “pay it forward”, Charles Dickens gave us Great Expectations. The story of orphan Pip’s social, moral and educational coming-of-age serves as critique of the wages of progress and the eternal value of friendship and gratitude. Dickens’ genius for creating memorable characters is robus, from young Pip, loyal Joe, his spiteful wife, the distant Estella, Magwitch the convict, Jaggers the lawyer, and most famously the bitter enigmatic Miss Havisham.

In our ensemble-based adaptation the twenty plus characters and the story’s first-person narrator will be collectively shared by multiple voices. Dickens loved the theater and stage adaptations of his novels have proliferated since he himself began the tradition of performing A Christmas Carol.

This class consists of the hours of study in and out of rehearsal necessary for an actor to build a successful performance in production.

Michael Cohen

The Dual Narrative and the Arab-Israeli Conflict (MED4206.01)

This course will look at one of the longest protracted conflicts in the world today. A complex conflict with many components this course will use the dual narrative approach to gain a deeper understanding of this century old war. Historical events and documents will be examined through the prism of the dual narrative. The dual narrative approach to the Arab-Israeli Conflict was developed by Dr. Sami Adwan of Bethlehem University and Dr. Dan Bar-On of Ben-Gurion University.

Allen Shawn

Musical Forms (MHI2240.01)

This class focuses on musical architecture, by examining beautiful works from the 18th, 19th, 20th and 21st centuries. We will listen to music by Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Fanny Hensel, Schumann, Brahms, Mahler, Ives, Stravinsky, Prokofiev, Schoenberg, Berg, Rzewski, Bernstein, Cage, Kurtag, Takemitsu and Gubaidulina (among others), analyzing their structures in detail. We will study traditional forms, such as sonata form, theme and variations, passacaglia, and fugue, but we will also try to understand works whose structures seem to have no precedent.

Traditional or not, each piece of music is unique. We will discuss the tension between structure and imagination, predetermined form and the individual creative impulse, and we will ponder such questions as what we mean by musical coherence or by the notion that we are “following” a piece of music, and where we would draw the line between structure and chaos (or whether such a distinction is simply a matter of opinion).

The ability to read music and knowledge of the rudiments of harmony are recommended, but not required. Non-musicians are welcome in the course. While they will be expected to learn some musical fundamentals and to develop some skill at score reading, they will be encouraged to discuss musical structure from their own vantage points (philosophical, literary, visual/spatial, scientific, etc.). Course work will include listening assignments, readings, a journal, two mid-size papers, and responses to four music workshops.

Ann Pibal

Interdisciplinary Studio/Seminar: Context and Original Documents (VA4123.01)

This multi-disciplinary studio seminar course will take as its platform the investigation of writing by artists about art and artists. Working directly with the generous resources of Crossett Library, students will read primary documents of art history – artists’ essays, letters and sketchbooks, while developing and re-presenting their own self-defined studio projects. We will establish a sense of historical context for our own endeavors in the studio through examining both the impetus behind artists’ work and also the connections and interactions between artists, designers, writers, and performers.

We will begin by studying the writings of many 20th century artists who are known for their facility not only with images and or objects, but also with words. Among these are Cezanne, Van Gogh, Philip Guston, Josef Beuys, Andy Warhol, Gerhard Richter, Robert Irwin, Robert Smithson, Donald Judd, Louise Bourgeois, and Agnes Martin. We will also take a close look at contemporary artists who have synthesized the practice of writing into their overall investigations including: Michelle Grabner, David Humphrey, Amy Sillman, Liam Gillick, Carrie Moyer and R.H. Quaytman.

In addition to shared reading, writing and discussion, students will create visual presentations and will conduct a significant research project of their own, centered in Crossett Library, which traces a lineage from their own studio projects, back through time, creating a kind of personal ‘story of art’.

Visual Arts Faculty

Visual Arts Lecture Series (VA2999.01)

This is a series of lectures given by visiting artists and critics invited by the Visual Arts faculty.

You will attend lectures on Tuesday evenings at 7:30 pm as well as gallery exhibitions. The number of lectures and exhibitions you must attend will vary according to how many are scheduled in any term.

You are required to take notes during the lectures and exhibitions and produce a one page analytical summary of each event. All papers must be typewritten and turned in at the Visual Arts office two weeks before the end of the term.

Daniel Michaelson

Mediation and Negotiation (MOD2110.02)

This module includes a twelve-hour training in Mediation and Negotiation skills. Mediation is a facilitated process where a third neutral party helps disputants with conflicting interests negotiate an agreement. The process of Mediation can be used in a range of conflicts such as family, roommate, sports, business, environmental, and international. Capacities such as active listening, defining interests, identifying issues, and developing options will be practiced. The difference between adversarial and principled negotiation will be explored. An official certificate is given to a student who successfully completes this training.

Students are also expected to attend one lecture, performance, or event outside of regularly scheduled class time.

This module will be held Monday, September 30 – Thursday, October 17.

Daniel Michaelson

Mediation and Negotiation (MOD2110.01)

This module includes a twelve-hour training in Mediation and Negotiation skills. Mediation is a facilitated process where a third neutral party helps disputants with conflicting interests negotiate an agreement. The process of Mediation can be used in a range of conflicts such as family, roommate, sports, business, environmental, and international. Capacities such as active listening, defining interests, identifying issues, and developing options will be practiced. The difference between adversarial and principled negotiation will be explored. An official certificate is given to a student who successfully completes this training.

Students are also expected to attend one lecture, performance, or event outside of regularly scheduled class time.

This module will be held Thursday, September 5 – Monday, September 23.

Dana Reitz

Noticing, Choosing, and Writing to Describe (MOD2107.04)

When looking at an object, watching something moving, experiencing the sound of an occurrence, witnessing an interaction between people, or noticing the surrounding circumstance of any object or event – how do we choose what we see? What are we not choosing? And how do we attempt to speak or write about it?

Focusing on any events or objects, not intentionally art, we will practice noticing myriad aspects of them, discussing them, and writing about them. The first week will be dedicated to describing objects, motion, and sound; the second to interactions between objects, living beings, etc; the third to surrounding circumstances of events.

Students are expected to write and rewrite a series of descriptions, fully participate in exercises and discussions. Students are also expected to attend one lecture, performance, or event outside of regularly scheduled class time.

This module will be held Monday, November 18 – Monday, December 9. Class will not be held on November 28 due to Thanksgiving break.

Daniel Michaelson

Theatre and the Arts for Peace and Reconciliation (MED4102.01)

How can Theatre, Visual Arts, Music and Dance help youth in at-risk situations, or build international peace, or rehabilitate prisoners, or help victims of genocide, or heal the environment? Students in this class will investigate various efforts both local and international that involve theatre and other arts for social action, including the “Belarusian Dream” project in Spring 2014, when Bennington College along with other international venues, will produce eight award-winning short plays dealing with Eastern European country of Belarus. Students in this class will write several short papers, help to develop a resource list, and work to create their own individual or collaborative ideas for future projects. Some students may want to follow up by enrolling in Jean Randich’s Spring 2014 class Belarusian Dream: Human Rights and Performance.

Dina Janis

Beat by Beat (DRA4122.01)

Students in this class will read a selection of plays and be required to analyze and explore these plays beat by beat in class discussion and weekly critical writing exercises.  This is a script interpretation class in which theme, dramatic structure and arc, character development, tone, style and extensive study of the given playwrights and their influences will be explored in detail.  This is not a performance class, though it is suggested for actors, directors, playwrights, designers, and students from other disciplines interested in dramatic literature.

Marguerite Feitlowitz

The Art of Literary Translation (LIT4319.01)

It may be that the closest, most interpretative and creative reading of a text involves translating from one language to another. Questions of place, culture, epoch, voice, gender, and rhythm take on new urgency, helping us deepen our skills and sensibilities in new ways. The seminar has a triple focus: comparing and contrasting existing translations of a single work; reading translators on the art and theory of translation; and the creation of your own translations. We will also consider translation as an act of bearing witness to cultural and political crisis, and as a means of encoding messages that would otherwise be censored.

You will have two options for a final project: a manuscript of original translations, accompanied by an introduction; or an extended literary essay on the issues at play in this course. You may work in any genre, from French, Spanish, Catalan, Italian, or Portuguese.

 

Marguerite Feitlowitz

Senior Projects (LIT4795.01)

For seniors working on special projects or senior theses. There will be one group meeting per week. In addition, each member of the class will have frequent individual meetings with the instructor during the course of the term.

Corequisites: Students are required to attend Literature Evenings (Wednesdays, 7 – 8pm).

 

Marguerite Feitlowitz

Don Quixote: “The First and Most Completest Novel” (LIT2182.01)

We will immerse ourselves in the first European novel, Cervantes’ 1605 tale of the wandering knight, his faithful Sancho Panza, and the cast of hundreds they meet along their way through La Mancha. We will read Edith Grossman’s new translation of Don Quixote, as well as biographical sources (such as Cervantes in Algiers, on the author’s years of captivity by the Barbary Pirates), and contextual materials (such as Rosa Menocal’s The Ornament of the World, on pre-1492 Christian-Muslim-Jewish Spain). We will also consider Cervantes’ influence over the centuries, on writers such as Sterne, Diderot, Borges, and Calvino.

 

Peter Jones

Second Language and Culture Acquisition (EDU2521.01)

Language and cultural learning are potentially transformative, yet can seem evanescent, elusive, and difficult to name and deliberately provide for. What conditions contribute to second language and cultural learning of the transformative kind? How does schooling both cooperate with, and block, opportunities for learning ? Sociocultural, interactionist, and linguistic perspectives structure our exploration of the conditions, processes and outcomes of second language learning. Course participants will engage in second language tutoring in the local school district with English as a Second Language students. The course is particularly recommended for preparation for a semester abroad and can also serve as an opportunity to reflect and theorize upon return.

 

Souleymane Badolo

Contemporary African II/Burkina Faso (DAN4307.01)

Souleymane Badolo will teach his technique as well as choreographic segments from his larger works. Deeply involving ourselves in the harmonization of gesture, touch, listening and responding, we will work toward precision of movement in time and space, searching for the essence of movement.

This course will be offered the first seven weeks of term.

Carol Pal

Genesis (HIS2220.01)

Genesis is the first book in a compilation known collectively as the Bible. It is a text of enormous literary value, and one of our earliest historical chronicles, providing foundational material for Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Yet how many of us know what it actually says? How did it come together, what is the narrative, and how does it relate to the ideas and events of the ancient world? We closely examine this surprising and contradictory work both as a text, and as a primary source for understanding the world that produced it.

Carol Pal

Renaissance and Reformation (HIS2110.01)

This course is a survey of the cultural, social, and religious movements that transformed Europe between 1350 and 1700. These revolutions in Western thought gave birth to the Enlightenment, and the intellectual outlook that still characterizes our culture today. Using primary source materials such as letters, literature, court records, and paintings, we examine large-scale changes and personal stories. We explore Renaissance art and humanism, theories of government, the Protestant Reformation, the Catholic response, explorations of the New World, and the Scientific Revolution.

Elizabeth Coleman; Susie Ibarra

APA Workshop: Focus: Cities (APA4150.01)

This workshop is designed to enable students to pursue a variety of issues relating to the advancing of public action. Cities serves both as a shared focus and a place to integrate a wide and rich variety of perspectives. Students will also be presenting their work to the workshop as it unfolds. Some portion of the workshop will also be dedicated to exploring concepts and methods that are capable of transforming ones relationship to public action independent of the particular issue being pursued. Bennington faculty and staff, CAPA Fellows and guests will participate throughout the workshop. The workshop will run throughout the year. Admission to the workshop requires a written statement outlining ones plans for how it will be used and an interview by the instructor.

Yoko Inoue

Advanced Slip Casting Project (CER4103.01)

This is an intermediate/advanced course for developing casting methods for making functional or sculptural ceramic components for mixed media projects. The focus will be on designing prototypes in various materials and investigating how specific aesthetics or functions can be achieved through the material transformation of ceramics.

We will explore creating complex forms by designing modular sculptures for interior architecture, utilitarian purposes, or installation components. Students are encouraged to bring an inter-disciplinary approach to bear on the project. A research assignment will be incorporated in this course to assist in the conceptual development. Basic knowledge of clay mixing, glaze application and firing is required for this class.

Yoko Inoue

Introduction to Slip Casting (CER2168.01)

This is an introductory course to basic mold making and slip casting techniques for producing multiple components to create sculptural ceramic objects or a series of functional ware.

This course focuses on the development of design concept through exploration of various casting methods, applying alteration techniques and experimenting with prototype making. Basic preparation of the material, glaze application and firing techniques will be introduced.

Susan Sgorbati; Erika Mijlin

Advanced Workshop in CAPA (APA4124.01)

This workshop is designed to enable students to pursue work they have already begun that is focused on public action regardless of the particular issue/s they are addressing and to integrate Field Work Term into that work. Students will be presenting their own work to the workshop as it unfolds. Some portion of the workshop will be dedicated to common experience in particular exploring those concepts and methods that inform this work including: multiple aspects of effective presentation writing, visual mapping, speaking; mediation and negotiation skills, the design and development of proposals. Bennington faculty and staff, CAPA Fellows and guests will participate throughout the workshop. Admission to the workshop requires a written statement outlining ones plans for how it will be used and an interview by the instructor. A year long course.

Carol Pal

Women in Science: Ancient Greece to Enlightenment (HIS4110.01)

Long before the existence of a discipline we would recognize as ‘science,’ there were women working with men in the pursuit of ‘scientia’. Scientia embraced a mixture of philosophy, medicine, religion, literature, and knowledge of the natural world a mixture that would eventually devolve into the separate disciplines we know today. But who were these ancient Greek female philosophers, these medieval ‘doctoresses,’ and these Enlightenment lady astronomers? How was it that they were so celebrated in their lifetimes, and yet they are so completely obscure today? What does that say about our understanding of the discourse and practice of ‘gender,’ or — perhaps more importantly our understanding of what we now deem to be the nature of scientific knowledge?

Erika Mijlin

How Do You Know: The Culture of Information (APA4106.01)

On a daily basis, we each define a relationship to information, as a bearer of truth, evidence, authority, timeliness, social leverage, insight, etc. Part seminar and part workshop, this course will attempt to make that complex relationship visible. We will first focus on a history of knowledge, and the various ways in which it has been used to organize the world. We will then move toward a contemporary understanding of information, data, and knowledge work, inquiring about the qualities of each of these, in theory and in practice. Through readings and projects we will explore questions of access to information, big data and the cloud, the uses of information, visualizing information, etc. We will put into action the cultural role of being an information-seeker across disciplines, experimenting with various ways of framing questions, collecting information, and presenting research.

 

Erika Mijlin

Media Technology and Social Change (APA2203.01)

From the print revolution to the birth of photography, from moving images to social networking, we find that new media technologies are continually adapting to us, as we simultaneously, and more subtly, adapt to them. Every wave of technological innovation leaves human existence more closely intertwined with media of documentation and communication. A central question forms this course’s premise : How has media technology changed the way we interact, the way we think, and the way we live, historically, and in the modern moment ? Reading Benjamin, McLuhan, Postman, Baudrillard, Sontag, etc. Screenings from Metropolis and Modern Times, from classic film documentaries to web projects, YouTube, video art, etc.

Robert Ransick

Social Practices in Art (VA4104.01)

Social practices in art incorporates many diverse strategies from interactive media, online networks, manifestos, street interventions, social sculpture, design, performance, activism, open systems, public discourse and more. In this course we examine the history of social practice and focus in on how media and technology are impacting and shifting current practice. Students are encouraged to work collaboratively on projects that critically engage topics pertinent to this moment in history and are situated in the public sphere — local or global, online or offline. There are lectures, reading assignments, studio projects and critiques during the course. Students from beyond the visual arts are encouraged to register.

Robert Ransick; Jon Isherwood

Object Oriented: Creating and Making with Technology (DA4208.01)

This class examines sophisticated technologies including , laser cutting, 3D printing, and CNC milling that provide new opportunities for conceiving and realizing creative ideas. We engage this new landscape of object making in relation to the fine arts and design. We will examine and respond to varying methodologies that have provoked a re-calibration of conceptual, aesthetic, and design values. Readings investigate current scholarship with respect to an ecology of things, emphasizing broader social, cultural and environmental concerns. We will develop and initiate strategies to move from idea to prototype, to final project. Students are encouraged to have some experience with a 3D program, Adobe Illustrator and/or physical computing.

Technologist: Guy Snover

Charles Schoonmaker

Advanced Portfolio Projects in Costume Design (DRA4157.01)

This class is intended for students who have previous experience in costume design, garment construction, or other demonstrated background in similar areas.

The format will be an intense immersion for 1/2 of the semester in projects and scripts with the goal of producing work which is portfolio worthy.

This course will be offered the first seven weeks of term.

Charles Schoonmaker

Packaging the Body: The History of Fashion (DRA2223.01)

This class will examine the history of fashion, primarily but not exclusively in the western world. The class will be oriented towards the use of historic costume by costume designers. Students will explore art works illustrative of the period styles and the interpretation of those styles by designers.

Corequisites: Dance or Drama lab assignment.

Souleymane Badolo

Contemporary African I/Burkina Faso (DAN2307.01)

Rooted in Contemporary African dance; dancing over/under/inside and outside the tradition. This is a course in Souleymane Badolo’s own movement style. We always begin class with a warm-up that involves both physical and mental preparation. We listen to internal rhythms and the beat of the music, learn about how to use the body in the space it occupies, and find ways of physically incorporating new information – answering questions the body may have.

This course will be offered the first seven weeks of term.

Elena Demyanenko

Experiential Anatomy/Somatic Practices (DAN4106.01)

This is a studio class intended to deepen the understanding of your own moving body. We will be studying kinesthetic anatomy: approaching the material through visual, cognitive, kinesthetic, and sensory modes. Class time will be divided between discussion of anatomy and kinesthetic concepts, and engagement with the material experientially through movement visualization and touch. Movement exercises will be designed to integrate the anatomical information by increasing somatic awareness (strengthening body-mind connection). Various body systems will be examined: skeleton, organs, muscles, nerves, and fluids. We will study the parts of each, then how each system relates to the whole: providing support for an integrated, healthy, as well as artistically interesting movement/dance practice. Class will be rooted in somatic movement approaches to movement education. Key developers of the field, many of whom have had a major influence on contemporary dance will be read as homework and discussed in class.

We will embody the learned information via improvisational and instruction-based games, thus enhancing ease and perhaps personal discovery. We will explore and create improvisational scores to take home and to integrate into daily practice in order to apply the findings of the class. Tools such as drawing and writing will become the building blocks for making clear and concise movement as well as serving to create a vehicle for the full and rich expression of the body and mind.

Elena Demyanenko

Basic Anatomy (DAN2132.01)

To understand the working of our own bodies, we will examine bones, deep muscles, organs, and nerves using images, visualization and touch, working to facilitate the ability to access the innate intelligence of each participants own unique mechanism. We will study the relationship and coordination between anatomical landmarks for a more thoughtful exploration of possibility and potential. Through the processes of touching and sensing, we will be able to highlight and study differences between individuals. We will look at a variety of sketches in addition to drawing and writing assignments in class and at home in order to deepen our knowledge. Improvisation will be used to apply this knowledge to actions so we can immediately demonstrate practical ways of moving, initiating, and relating. We will utilize reading material from Bonnie Bainbridge Cohen, Moshe Feldenkrais, and Susan Klein, plus many other teachers to discuss, analyze and compare.

Ikuko Yoshida

Edo to Meiji: Isolation to Modernization (JPN4168.01)

During the Edo period (1600 – 1867), Japan closed its doors to other countries for about two hundred years, and this isolation helped Japan develop its own unique culture. It, however, ended in 1867 when Japanese culture was introduced to the Western world at an International Exposition in Paris. On the contrary to the Edo period, the next era, Meiji, brought rapid westernization to the Japanese society.

In this course, students will study the historical events of the Edo and Meiji periods using paintings to analyze how one event in history can have reverberations both within Japan and throughout the world. As students examine the western influences on Japanese society and the Japanese influences on Western society in the 19th century, they not only will practice linguistic skills, but also will obtain a deeper understanding of the Japanese history and society.

As the final project of this course, students are required to present their understandings of 19th century Japan and of how ideas and concepts specific to one culture travel and get adopted by another culture.

Ikuko Yoshida

Deconstructing and Reconstructing Identity (JPN2108.01)

The Japanese pop culture has gained popularity in the US, and many American children watch various Japanese animations, while growing up. However, lack of Japanese cultural knowledge sometimes makes it hard for the American audience to fully understand whats going on in the Japanese characters mind.

Therefore, in this introductory Japanese language and culture course, students will not only examine how Japanese people communicate and why American and Japanese behave differently, but also perform various situations that students will face if attending a Japanese university. Students will practice listening, speaking, reading, and writing Japanese through various contexts and materials. Students will also experience deconstructing and reconstructing their identity by immersing themselves into a Japanese culture. Japanese writing systems – Hiragana, Katakana, and Kanji – will be introduced.

Kaori Washiyama
Hugh Crowl

Communicating Science to the Public (SCMA4106.01)

One of the largest challenges scientists and media face is communication of complex scientific ideas to the public. This is despite the vast importance of this enterprise: if science is the advancement of human knowledge, scientists have an obligation to communicate what they learn to the public. In this class, we will learn strategies for communicating science to the public using electronic tools: specifically blogs, podcasts and web videos. A significant component of this will focus on writing about science for public consumption, in addition to technical instruction on how to record and edit audio and video. The topics of the projects in the course will be student-designed, so it is expected that students will enter the course with a firm grounding in science at the college level. Exceptions to this expectation may be granted on a case-by-case basis.

Elizabeth Coleman

Fundamentals of Advancing Public Action (APA2101.01)

This country is facing challenges of unprecedented scale and urgency in the areas of health, education, inequalities in the distribution of wealth, environmental sustainability; the capacity of our governing structures to address the public interest; mounting threats to fundamental democratic processes, a dangerous predilection for the uses of force. We examine each of these topics individually while recognizing their interdependence. We also address capacities fundamental to this work regardless of the particular topic. They include: working with data; reading; seeing; listening; connecting; understanding improvisation; managing issues of scale. Throughout the course the focus is on the challenge of effective action in the world in ways that go beyond the ad hoc and address causes rather than symptoms. In addition to engaging materials that illuminate the current state of things we engage texts that allow us to explore the role of the past in charting the future and the critical matter of values.

David Anderegg

Psychological Experimentation (PSY2109.01)

Psychologists collect data about people and do so systematically. This course will use the history of psychology and look at classic psychological experiments as a way to think about experimentation itself: how do we answer the questions we really want to ask? Historically important experiments in social, developmental, abnormal and cognitive psychology will be read and critiqued, and a few will be replicated by the class as a group. Students will be expected to write short reaction papers on the theme of historical experiments, and to design their own extensions of these classic experiments. We will also address ethical issues in psychological experimentation.

This course will be offered the second seven weeks of term.

David Anderegg

Thinking Like a Social Scientist (PSY2108.01)

This course introduces the method and materials of social science disciplines and focuses on how social scientists make arguments. The disciplines differ in their methods (for example experimental data analysis in psychology versus observational data in anthropology) but share a commitment to rigorous, non-prejudicial argument and a sometimes successful effort to transcend the personal biases of the scholar. Students will learn to read scholarly papers and practice making their own arguments by writing short papers in the style of various social science disciplines.

This course will be offered the first seven weeks of term.

Benjamin Anastas

Reading and Writing: The Novel (LIT4326.01)

What is the novel and how is it constructed? This course will treat the novel, primarily, as an exercise in form, and take students on in-depth tour of the traditions as they have evolved: the epistolary novel, the picaresque, the bildungsroman, the sturdy ‘realist’ or ‘naturalist’ novel, meta-fiction in its many different guises. We’ll read from the novel’s beginnings in the 18th Century (Richardson, Sterne) through the 19th (Flaubert, Gogol, James, Twain) and the 20th (Woolf, Bellow). We’ll also dissect the contemporary meta-fictions of Jeannette Winterson, David Mitchell, and Percival Everett. Students are expected to write frequent exercises in fiction writing and produce the beginning of a novel of their own for a final project.

Corequisites: Students are required to attend Literature Evenings (Wednesdays, 7 – 8pm).

Benjamin Anastas

Steal This Book: Literature of the 60s and 70s (LIT2248.01)

The 1960s and 70s have been so thoroughly trivialized by the culture wars that Timothy Leary’s mantra ‘Turn on, tune in and drop out’ has become the era’s defining slogan. But the counter-culture helped produce some of the most genre-breaking literature we have, and this course will dive into the alternative canon for a long, strange trip among the famous, the forgotten, and the just plain weird. We’ll read work by the era’s most direct precursors, the Beats (Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg); ride with the Merry Pranksters (Ken Kesey); protest literary tradition with misfits like Norman Mailer, Grace Paley, Rudy Wulitzer, and Richard Brautigan; and revisit indispensable documents like ‘The Autobiography of Malcolm X’ and ‘The Port Huron Statement.’

Jenny Rohn

An Actor’s Technique – Nuts and Bolts (DRA4127.01)

How do actors bridge the gap between themselves and the role they are playing? How do actors rehearse with other actors in order to explore the world of the play? This non-performance based class is designed to help individual actors discover their own organic, thorough rehearsal process. Step by step we will clarify the actor’s process: character research, character exploration, text analysis, identifying actions, working with scene partners, emotional preparation, and scene presentation. Each student will be required to research and present the biography of one renowned actor during the term, and these presentations will serve as a springboard for an on-going group conversation about the craft of acting. Students will work to create a warm-up specifically designed to meet their individual needs, and work on one scene throughout the term, allowing them to explore deeply, revise, and edit their choices. Various rehearsal techniques will be explored, so that students can begin creating their own rehearsal technique for future performance work.

Corequisites: Dance or Drama lab assignment.

Liz Deschenes

The Archive in Art (VA4216.01)

This seven-week course is an introduction to the archive and how it has been central to artistic production of the 20th and 21st centuries. We will read Walter Benjamins Archive, Archive Fever: Uses of The Document in Contemporary Art, and conclude with The Big Archive. There will be lectures on how the archive exists in specific artists works. Students will be given short research assignments that will allow them to conclude the seminar with presentations of their own.

This course will be offered the first seven weeks of term.

Liz Deschenes

Color Investigated Through Light (VA4108.01)

This course will focus on examples and strategies of the various disciplines that have used light and color as a central component to their work- we will closely look at photographers, light installation artists, and film and video artists. Students will be given short assignments in the first seven weeks and a project based on their inquiries (approved by the faculty member) for the 2nd half of term.

David Anderegg

Normality and Abnormality (PSY2204.01)

This course is an examination of the idea of normality as a central organizing principle in psychology. We begin with an effort to define normality and/or psychological health, and then move on to examine the limits or borders of normality. The course examines the value-laden, historically determined, and political nature of psychological normality. Topics discussed include: psychoanalytic contributions to the study of psychopathology (Freud and Erikson); normality and creativity; contemporary psychiatry; and the politics of mental illness.

Students write one medium-length paper on issues raised in the course and participate in one small-scale research effort related to course topics.

Jon Isherwood

Projects in Sculpture: Making It Personal (SCU4797.01)

The question is what do you want to say? As we develop our interests in sculpture it becomes more and more imperative to find our own voice. The role of the artist is to interpret personal conditions and experiences and find the most affecting expression for them. This course provides the opportunity for a self-directed study in sculpture. Students are expected to produce a significant amount of work outside of regular class meetings. The goal is for students to become fully versed in the issues that define traditional and contemporary sculpture. Regular individual and bi-weekly group critiques will be complemented by student presentations of issues pertaining to their work. Students will be expected to attend field trips to museums and galleries. A project in the installation space, a project on the sign out wall, and a self evaluation paper are required.

Amie McClellan

Introduction to the Biology of Cancer (BIO2104.01)

The cells in our bodies need to grow and divide in order to make new tissue, and to repair or replace damaged tissue. The processes that govern cell growth and division are tightly regulated. When the cells that comprise the tissues of our bodies lose the ability to properly regulate their growth and proliferation, cancer is the result. This introductory level course will provide an overview of the basic causes, mechanisms and genetics underlying human cancers, as well as explore current diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

Amie McClellan
Warren Cockerham

Video/Performance (FV2140.01)

The basic goals of this class are to familiarize students with the practices and possibilities of collaboration between performance and video. Its aim is to encourage the camera to become more embedded in the world of the performer by allowing experimentation to lead to innovative fusions of multiple disciplines and styles. This class will rely on a mix of historical, theoretical, and aesthetic study in both readings and screenings as well as technical training and practice in lighting, shooting, scoring, and editing.

This course will be offered the second seven weeks of term.

John Bullock; Amie McClellan

Science and Math Fifth Term Seminar (SCMA4105.01)

This two-credit seminar is required for all fall-term juniors with Plans that significantly involve mathematics or science (other students may register with permission of instructors if background is appropriate and space permits). The seminar is a forum for reading and discussion of primary and secondary literature with the goal of gaining a broad sense of the work of scientists and mathematicians across a wide range of disciplines. Students will read deeply in order to gain greater sophistication in science: Why was this question asked? Where does it fit into the larger picture? What is the next step? This ‘conversation in science’ will inform and encourage students as they begin to articulate their own ideas for advanced projects.

John Bullock

Chemistry 3: Organic Reactions and Mechanisms Lab (CHE4213L.01)

This laboratory course is a co-requisite for Chemistry 3. Lab topics will likely include organic reactions such as subsitution, elimination and addition processes, chemical kinetics, and electrochemistry. Students will also have an opportunity to perform exploratory investigations to help design an independent research project to be carried out during Spring term.

John Bullock

Chemistry 3: Organic Reactions and Mechanisms (CHE4213.01)

Chemistry 3 focuses on how reactions happen: what the steps are, how we discover them, and how we use this to look at some practical systems: the synthesis of a drug, the kinetics of substitution. Emphasis will be using the general principles such as nucleophiles and electrophiles, to guide an understanding of specific reactions. Lab will focus on several clusters of experiments designed for students to extend what they know to answer questions of their own. A major project will be the development of a research proposal based on the student’s own question. Background from the literature will motivate the proposal and initial experiments will be proposed.

Corequisites: Students must also register for the lab, CHE4213L.01.

Michael Dumanis

Genres and Forms of Poetry (LIT4164.01)

This course will closely examine various genres of poetry, including the narrative poem, the elegy, the ode, the ekphrastic, the prose poem, the pastoral, the aubade, the list poem, and the erasure. Students will also be introduced to traditional prosody and acquire a familiarity with writing in meter, and will read poetry written in such traditional forms as the villanelle, the sestina, the pantoum, and the ghazal. Each week students will read a collection of poems (or its equivalent) in a given genre. Weekly critical response papers and creative assignments on each of the genres or forms, and one longer critical paper.

Michael Dumanis

The New York School of Poetry (LIT2198.01)

This course will serve as an immersion in the work of several major American poets of the 1950s and 1960s, noted for their humor, irreverence, disjunctive experimentation, charm, and wildness, and collectively known as the New York School. We will begin by focusing on the original generation of New York School poets: John Ashbery, Frank OHara, Kenneth Koch, James Schuyler, and Barbara Guest. We will also study the Abstract Expressionist painters who were these poets contemporaries and close friends, discuss connections between New York School poets and the French surrealists of the early 20th century, and examine the New York School against the cultural, political, and social landscape of 1960s New York. We will then trace the influence of the New York School on subsequent generations of writers, reading the work of Ted Berrigan, Joe Brainard, Bernadette Mayer, Eileen Myles, Anne Waldman, Joseph Ceravolo, Hannah Weiner, Dean Young, Joshua Beckman, Dorothea Lasky, and Lisa Jarnot. Students are responsible for presentations, weekly response papers, and two longer critical projects.

Hui Cox
David Edelman

Reimagining Memory in Biology and Beyond (BIO2140.01)

How are memories formed, stored, and accessed? This question has been central to psychology and neuroscience since their founding. In this class, we will first review psychological and neurobiological views of memory. We will then explore how memory as a dynamic process might be extended to biological—and even non-biological—systems outside the brain. We will survey cultural, social, and linguistic concepts of memory. Finally, we will compare and contrast two compelling—but very different and competing—views of memory: one in which memories are created from the ground up through a process of instruction; and another in which memories arise from selective interactions between an unlabeled world and vast repertoires of pre-defined components, i.e., neurons and neuronal networks. Can such a selection-based view of memory be extended well beyond nervous systems into non-biological domains of human interaction?

This is a survey course in which we’ll be exploring the concept of memory in the broadest of terms. As such, it is intended for both students thinking of concentrating in neuroscience and those outside of the sciences wishing to explore the relevance of an important focus of neuroscience to their own areas of interest.

Kate Purdie
Jonathan Kline

The Digital Photo Book (PHO4130.01)

From photography’s inception, photo books have been critical to the medium and have provided a way to understand our culture’s use of images. In 1844 William Henry Fox Talbot utilized the book form with the first lens-based book, ‘The Pencil of Nature’. In this course, students will explore the photo-based artist book as a vehicle for self-expression. A a variety of approaches to the photo book will be introduced through a mix of readings, presentations, assignments, and critiques.

The class will cover a large scope of photography from pre-WWII books acting as markers of place and people such as Walker Evans’ collaborative effort, ‘Let Us Now Famous Men’, to various current versions of documentary projects rooted in personal observation. Careful attention will be given to books that help shape the field, including Robert Frank’s ‘The Americans’, along with many contemporary practitioners such as Larry Sultan, Wendy Ewald, Daido Moriyama, and Alec Soth. The ways in which photographs function and create meaning through sequence, narrative, design, and text within the book format will be examined. Students will be introduced to different ways of conceptualizing a book project, exploring a range of methods whether based through structuring a book by theme or with other approaches such as a nonlinear narrative.

Through assignments students will learn basic skills in page layout software with Lightroom. Photo-based books will be produced using a print-on-demand publisher such as Blurb.

Jonathan Kline

Historical Processes (PHO4321.01)

This class investigates a variety of photographic processes that evolved in the second half of the nineteenth century and continue to be used by contemporary photographers today. We will explore the historical and chemical aspects of the following: light sensitive silver, iron, and palladium compounds; photogenic drawings; cyanotypes; collodion glass plate negatives; Van Dyke & Kallitypes; palladium prints.

Each student has the opportunity to print his or her own images with a variety of these processes, and to become familiar with making enlarged negatives digitally and in the wet lab. The 4×5 view camera will also be introduced, along with slide presentations and assigned readings covering Pictorialism, Surrealism, and contemporary practitioners. Students are required to keep a notebook/journal of their experiments, and to present a final creative portfolio at the end of the term.

Jonathan Kline

Photography Foundation (PHO2302.02)

The objective of this course is to provide the student with a proficiency in the basics of 35mm black and white photography. Class time will be spent working in the darkroom, lab demonstrations, and discussions of student work. In addition to technical lectures and reviews, a selection of images from the history of photography will be shown and discussed throughout the term. The slide presentations will introduce students to various photographic genres with an emphasis on contemporary practice. Reading assignments, and one writing assignment will also be part of this course.

 

Jonathan Pitcher

So Far from God: A Border Project (POL4238.01)

Despite the trend towards supposed globalization, the geographical demarcation of national boundaries, though often artificially constructed and the sites of complex, hybrid cultures, tends to be perceived as embodying reality, with real, sometimes violent, consequences for those living through such differentiation.

To name but one specific problem, even in the wake of supposedly neoliberal policy prescriptions such as the Washington Consensus and NAFTA, the question of sovereignty continues to burden US-Mexico relations, earning the two countries the suspect distinction of overseeing the most illegally crossed international border anywhere, and arguably criminalizing Mexicans more pervasively in the collective consciousness of the US.

In the second seven weeks of Fall term, via linguistic, theoretical, geographical, historical and political inquiry, students will articulate a problem associated with this specific border, proving their expertise in that area, presenting their research to the group, and testing their hypotheses. The latter will be tested again by an optional 2-week field-research visit to the Arizona / Sonora area, eligible for FWT credit. (on-site organization provided by Williams College and Borderlinks.org).

This course will be offered the second seven weeks of term.

Amie McClellan

Genetics – Principles and Practice (BIO4207.01)

What are genes? How do they work? How are they passed on? This course will provide an introduction to modes of inheritance as well as to genes, their structure, and their regulation. Topics discussed in this class will include, but are not limited to, the molecular structure of DNA and RNA, Mendelian inheritance, molecular properties of genes, and the regulation of gene expression. The laboratory portion of this course will provide hands-on experience with genome-wide genetic screening, highlighting the increasing importance of high-throughput approaches and bioinformatics in the post-genome sequence era.

Corequisites: Student must also register for lab, BIO4207L.

Jonathan Pitcher

Women in Latin America (SPA4256.01)

Latin American feminism is conventionally read like any other form of feminism, as an absence attempting to become present. Pivoting around a selection of short stories by the likes of the Ocampos, Bombal, Garro, Valenzuela, Poniatowska, Peri Rossi, Menchú, Allende, and Schweblin, along with criticism and political contextualization, we will discuss such conventional readings, comparing different responses to superstructural power within Latin America while also asking whether more general, pan-American points can or should be made. Discussions and presentations will be conducted in Spanish, appropriate to the high intermediate level. Some background reading may be conducted in English.

Kathryn Montovan

Nonlinear Dynamical Systems (MAT4127.01)

Dynamical systems are interactions that change in somewhat predictable ways. For these systems, rules can be written to describe the future state of a system from knowledge of present and past states. These rules are used to model a wide variety of phenomena in the physical, biological, social and economic sciences. This course will build on calculus skills and visual intuition to understand complex interactions in physical systems. It will be an introduction to nonlinear dynamics, with applications to physics, engineering, biology, and chemistry. Emphasis will be placed on using analytical methods, concrete examples, and geometric thinking. Topics will include one-dimensional systems; bifurcations; phase plane analysis; nonlinear oscillators; and Lorenz equations, chaos, strange attractors, fractals, iterated mappings, period doubling, renormalization.

Kathryn Montovan

Introduction to Applied Mathematics (MAT2111.01)

In this course we will develop mathematical modeling skills that will help us better understand the complex systems that arise in different scientific fields. Applications will include population growth, predator-prey systems, planetary motion, reaction and diffusion, heat and fluid flow, and evolutionary trees. To model these systems, we will use difference equations, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions, dimensional analysis, estimation of orders of magnitude, interpretation of graphs, and elementary probability. This course is not a repetition of high school mathematics; rather, it places high school mathematics in a larger context, and concentrates on the applications of mathematical thinking to the sciences. You do not need to know about logarithms or trig functions to take the course – we will develop these from the beginning but you should be comfortable with topics like elementary algebra and drawing simple graphs.

Jonathan Pitcher

The Art of Spanish I: Language Through Painting (SPA2107.01)

Students with little or no Spanish will learn the language through an immersion in Latin American painting. While there will be some discussion of standard tactics such as stylistic nuances and artists’ biographies, it is expected that we will rapidly develop sufficient linguistic ability to focus on movements, ranging from the republican art of nation-building in the 19th century to modernism, magical realism, and the postmodern, thus treating the works as ideologemes, representations of political and social import. The equipment associated with mastering a foreign language – explicit grammar sessions, vocabulary, oral and aural practice, text – will be on offer, but it will generally be student-driven, servicing the content, corroborating the hope that in confronting our own preconceived notions of the Spanish-speaking world we will simultaneously debunk those regarding how a language is taught. Students will therefore learn to speak, listen, read and write in increasingly meaningful scenarios. Introductory level. Conducted in Spanish.

Andrew McIntyre

Sets, Measure and Topology (MAT4106.01)

This course provides a brief introduction to three foundational areas of modern mathematics: set theory, measure theory, and topology. In set theory, we will see how to count well past infinity (ordinal and cardinal arithmetic), and we will also see how set theory forms a logical foundation for the whole of modern mathematics. In topology, we will see how continuous deformation is defined and used (for example in fixed point theorems), and in particular we will look at the concept of the dimension of a set (for example, what makes a line one dimension, or a plane two dimensions). Measure theory asks how one can define and find the ‘content’ of a set, that is ‘how much stuff is in it’ (for example, length of a curve or area of a region); we will see examples of sets, called fractal, for which the most natural measures of how much ‘stuff’ is in them involve thinking of them as sets of fractional dimension.

This course is ideal as an immediate sequel to MAT2115, Introduction to Pure Mathematics. It will be a valuable foundation for anyone considering seriously studying more mathematics; in particular, it will be a prerequisite for Real Analysis in Spring 2014.

Andrew McIntyre

Introduction to Pure Mathematics (MAT2115.01)

Are there infinitely many prime numbers? How can we know? How do we know for certain that the infinitely many digits in the decimal expansion of the square root of 2 never repeat? Can we ever have definite knowledge about abstractions like infinite sets or the fourth dimension? These questions are typical of ‘pure’ mathematics: mathematics studied for its own sake rather than for any particular application. Pure mathematical questions are usually not only about how to compute something (e.g. how to find prime numbers), but also about how we know something for certain (e.g. that there are infinitely many prime numbers). However, pure mathematics often leads to important applications. This class is an introduction to this type of reasoning. We will look at some fundamental ideas of mathematics: rational and irrational numbers, infinite sets, geometric axioms, and some classic questions about them. This course is intended to serve as a foundation, and it will be a prerequisite for many other advanced mathematics courses. Students will be expected to have a good facility with high school algebra. Students without this solid background can still take the course if they are willing to work on this as the course progresses.

 

Warren Cockerham

Experimental Filmmaking (FV4307.01)

This intermediate studio course centers on experimentation with form in moving image making. Students will complete a series of film and video projects exploring approaches and techniques including but not limited to non-narrative, lyrical, abstract, structural, and materialist forms. The course will contextualize contemporary practice within the history of avant-garde and underground film through screenings, theoretical and historical readings, and discussion.

Corequisites: Must also participate in screenings in Kinoteca, (Wednesdays 7:00pm – 9:00pm).

Warren Cockerham

Introduction to Video (FV2101.01)

This course teaches techniques fundamental to the craft of moving image creation, including cinematography, lighting, sound recording, and editing. It also provides a conceptual framework for video as an art medium. Students will build individual technical skills while developing an aesthetic vocabulary based on medium-specific audiovisual qualities. Throughout the term we will screen a broad range of examples of film and video works of genres both familiar and perhaps alien. We will address ideas and techniques spanning storytelling and nonnarrative approaches, fiction and nonfiction, linear and nonlinear structures (such as web-based projects), abstraction and representation. We’ll spend equal time on the technical skills and the creative possibilities of sound and image editing.

 

Ann Pibal

Painting Studio (PAI4204.01)

This course will provide the student a broad platform from which to continue investigations in painting. Emphasis will be placed on cultivating individual research and conceptual concerns as well as the continued development of an understanding of color, form, and space. The daily experience of looking, along with the history of art will provide a base from which investigations will be made. Formal, poetic and social implications within artwork, both form class and from art history will be examined and discussed. Students will complete work weekly, there will be regular group critiques, individual reviews, reading assignments and lectures by visiting artists. A high degree of motivation is expected.

 

Ann Pibal

Form and Process: Investigations in Painting (PAI2107.01)

This course introduces a variety of materials, techniques and approaches to painting. Emphasis is placed on developing and understanding of color, form and space as well as individual research and conceptual concerns. The daily experience of seeing, along with the history of art, provides a base from which investigations are made. Formal, poetic, and social implications within paintings both from class and from art history are examined and discussed. Students complete work weekly. There are regular group critiques, and individual reviews, reading assignments and lectures by visiting artists. A high degree of motivation is expected.

 

Dina Janis

The Actor’s Instrument (DRA2170.02)

The craft of acting will be the main focus of this class. Through physical and vocal warm-up exercises, sensory exploration, improvisation, scene work, and extensive reading students will be asked to develop an awareness of their own unique instrument as actors and learn to trust their inner impulses where this is concerned. Extensive out of class preparation of specific exercises as well as rehearsal with scene partners will constitute the bulk of expected work. Students can expect this to amount to six hours of required rehearsal time per week. In addition students will read several plays throughout the term, as well as weekly theory handouts. The writings, exercises, and work of such theater artists as Anne Bogart, Constantin Stanislavski, Sanford Meisner, Uta Hagen, Jerzy Grotowski among others will be researched and discussed in class.

Corequisites: Dance or Drama lab assignment.

Susan Sgorbati

The Sababa Project: Children in Crisis (MED4202.01)

There are similarities in children and adolescents all over the world who are in crisis, whether they are youth at-risk in the United States as a result of domestic violence, poverty, drug abuse, or for academic reasons, or if they are youth at-risk in countries that are at-risk, for example, because of horrific violence or issues of economic or environmental sustainability.

This class will meet regularly with students from the Quantum Leap alternative classroom at Mount Anthony Union High School in Bennington. Separately, and together, we will look at adolescence – moving from ‘telling your story’, to understanding adolescent developmental issues (including differences particular to boys or girls), to examining solutions and approaches that help young people navigate the world, to expanding the sense of connection to other communities.

There will be guest speakers from the faculty and community. Readings will include ‘A Mind at a Time’ (Mel Levine), ‘A Training Guide for Mentors’ (Jay Smink),as well as fiction and non-fiction dealing with adolescents coming of age. Films may include ‘Promises’, ‘Invisible Children’, and ‘Pass on the Gift’ (Heifer International Foundation).

Bennington College students will write several small reflection essays and one longer research paper, act as mentors to the Quantum Leap students, as well as participate in a small group collaboration with them to create a project that demonstrates sustainability practices in a country of the group’s choosing.

John Umphlett

Metal Workshop Part II (SCU4110.01)

For the second seven weeks we will develop skills in working with equipment that lends itself to non- ferrous metals, other exotic alloys, and stainless steel. We will gain knowledge of GTAW welding in the areas of direct current electrode negative (DCEN), direct current electrode positive (DCEP), and also AC welding. With new technologies we are able to adjust the output frequency of AC welding and broaden the possibilities of fabrication. Along with the welding capabilities that will be taught, appropriate preparation and clean-up processes will be practiced.\

This course will be offered the second seven weeks of term.

John Umphlett

Metal Workshop (SCU2206.01)

This course is recommended for all students considering working in sculpture. It is open to other students with a curiosity about materials and building processes. There are fundamental introductions to gas and electric welding, forging, fabrication techniques, and general shop safety.

This course will be offered the first seven weeks of term.

Eileen Scully

Effective Public Action: Case Studies (APA2116.01)

What kind of world are we making? What kind of world should we be making? What kind of world can we be making? We explore these questions through case studies of successful public action, ranging from local projects to global initiatives. Working together to identify the complex variables and design principles of successful models, students collaboratively develop frameworks for effective solutions to consequential problems.

Eileen Scully

Wicked Problems (MOD2126.04)

‘Wicked problems’ demand answers and resist remedies. They loom large, yet cannot be located or pinned down. Examples include global warming, terrorism, poverty, and human trafficking. After orienting ourselves in the topology and terminology of ‘wicked problems,’ we will do a brief survey of innovative approaches. Using downloadable share-ware specifically designed to tackle this species of ‘wickedness,’ we will undertake hands-on application of two particularly accessible and intriguing approaches: dialogue mapping, and argumentative design. There is no assumption that students will already be familiar with computer-assisted visualization or dialogue mapping, though curiosity about wickedness is essential.

This module will be held Monday, November 18 – Monday, December 9. Class will not be held on November 28 due to Thanksgiving Break.

Eileen Scully

Wicked Problems (MOD2126.02)

‘Wicked problems’ demand answers and resist remedies. They loom large, yet cannot be located or pinned down. Examples include global warming, terrorism, poverty, and human trafficking. After orienting ourselves in the topology and terminology of ‘wicked problems,’ we will do a brief survey of innovative approaches. Using downloadable share-ware specifically designed to tackle this species of ‘wickedness,’ we will undertake hands-on application of two particularly accessible and intriguing approaches: dialogue mapping, and argumentative design. There is no assumption that students will already be familiar with computer-assisted visualization or dialogue mapping, though curiosity about wickedness is essential.

This module will be held Monday, September 30 – Thursday, October 17.

Sarah Harris

Our Monsters, Ourselves (SPA4715.01)

‘We live in a time of monsters,’ writes Jeffrey Jerome Cohen in Monster Theory. As beings who mix categories or defy categorization altogether, monsters may be apt emblems for a postmodern age, yet it would be a mistake to imply that monsters are a creation of postmodernity. The monstrous figures that dominate popular contemporary culture come from a long artistic tradition, and their depictions both promote and reveal fears. The fears underlying the monstrous, universal or particular to moments and places, call special attention to the darkness that dwells within all of us, even in our denial of it.

This course will build theoretical underpinnings with Frederich Nietzsche, Umberto Eco, James Twitchell, Michel Foucault, and Adam Douglas. Together, we will consider concrete literary examples from the Spanish Baroque and the Nocilla Generation, before students’ individual research will begin to drive the content. Therefore, we will create ample opportunity to consider examples from any time and place in the Hispanophone world. We will, in the end, hope to uncover more about the values of normative groups that vilify and externalize, than about the monsters these norms denigrate. Advanced level. In Spanish.

James Voorhies

Critical Texts in Recent Art (VA4154.01)

This course is a reading seminar of important texts on art and culture by critics, theorists and artists from late modernism through postmodernism to the present moment. It will include close readings and discussions of essays from 1960 to 2013 to consider the changing conditions under which art is conceived, produced, distributed and experienced. A departure point for the course is Michael Frieds seminal essay Art and Objecthood (1967), which critiqued the solicitation of the spectator in Minimalist art and subsequently generated a discourse on the fate of the autonomous position of art. That discourse continues to resonate today, and with this in mind the course gives particular attention to the increasingly integrated role of the spectator in contemporary artistic practices.

Rachel Rosales

Advanced Voice (MVO4401.01)

Advanced study of vocal technique and the interpretation of the vocal repertoire, designed for advanced students who have music as a plan concentration and to assist graduating seniors with preparation for senior recitals. Students are required to study and to perform a varied spectrum of vocal repertory for performance and as preparation for further study or graduate school. A class maximum of five voice students will meet for one-hour individual session/coachings with the instructor each week (to be scheduled with the instructor). Students will also have an individual half-hour session with a pianist each week to work on repertory.

Corequisites: Must also participate in Music Workshop (Tuesday, 6:30 – 8pm).

Liz Deschenes

Photography Foundation (PHO2302.01)

The objective of this course is to provide the student with a proficiency in the basics of 35mm black and white photography. Class time will be spent working in the darkroom, lab demonstrations, and discussions of student work. In addition to technical lectures and reviews, a selection of images from the history of photography will be shown and discussed throughout the term. The slide presentations will introduce students to various photographic genres with an emphasis on contemporary practice. Reading assignments, and one writing assignment will also be part of this course.

Hugh Crowl
Dana Reitz

Advanced Projects in Dance (DAN4795.01)

This is an essential course for students involved in making work for performance this term. Attention is given to all of the elements involved in composition and production, including collaborative aspects. Students are expected to show their work throughout stages of development, complete their projects, and perform them to the public by the end of the term.

Corequisites: Must also participate in Dance Workshop (Thursday, 7 – 8:30pm) and Dance or Drama lab assignment.

Doug Bauer

Double Portrait: Of a Lady and Her Novel (LIT2223.01)

We will be examining Henry James’s The Portrait of a Lady from several perspectives, starting with a close reading of the novel itself. As well, we’ll be reading Michael Gorra’s recently published Portrait of a Novel, which uniquely blends criticism, biography, historical context and earned authorial speculation as a guide to James’s life during the time he was writing his book and the ways in which his personal experience influenced the particular fiction he was creating. We might also be including other works of fiction and criticism Gorra mentions as relevant to a full appreciation of James’s masterpiece.

This course will be offered the second seven weeks of term.

Doug Bauer

Masters of Style (LIT4362.01)

This course is founded on the belief that the way to a writer’s personal style and voice is through the close study, absorption, and imitation of others’. We will be reading and replicating many contemporary master stylists, from Doctorow to DeLillo to Toni Morrison to Denis Johnson to Amy Hempel, and others. In every case, we will conduct a three-part examination of the work being considered: an analysis of the intentions and themes; an oral report concerning some aspect of style; and an original piece that tries to reproduce the writer’s style as closely as possible.

NB: The goal here is creative expression through close imitation. It requires students to check their own styles-and their investments in them-at the door.

Corequisites: Students are required to attend Literature Evenings (Wednesdays, 7 – 8pm).

Sarah Pike

Silkscreen / Serigraphy Workshop (PRI2112.01)

This course will focus on the basic technical processes of screen printing including, screen preparation, image development, registration, paper handling, and printing multi run prints. Through demonstrations and hands on experiences students will complete a series of projects using block out methods and photo emulsion by creating hand-drawn and digital films. Particular emphasis will be placed on color interaction, mixing, and layering. Students should expect to be working on both independent and collaborative projects.

This course will be offered the first seven weeks of the term.

Doug Bauer

Charles Dickens: Novels and Biography (LIT2284.01)

Dickens’ novels are works of approachable genius, transmitted through their comedy, pulsing energy and relentless life. They also reflect fictional shapings of Dickens’ life, obsessions in the man that regularly recur in the art. We will be reading a biography of Dickens, three of his major novels, including the two most autobiographical, David Copperfield and Great Expectations, and some pertinent criticism. The classroom conversation will be a mixture of narrative patterns noted, themes observed and traced, meanings analyzed and proposed, with close reading and regular student participation essential.

 

Barry Bartlett

The Language of Material and Process (CER4250.01)

This course will investigate the unique, material nature of clay as a sculptural medium.

Students will explore the material aspects of clay such as dryness, wetness, mass and scale using a variety of mechanical processes that include extrusion, slab rolling, mold casting and experimental digital ceramic printing. In doing so, the pieces created will be used to convey ideas of form and process as both the vocabulary and meaning expressed.

Students are expected to participate in all aspects of the ceramic process, which include, but are not limited to, mixing their own clay, slip and glaze preparation, and loading and firing of kilns.

Rachel Rosales

Exploring 20th Century American & British Art Song (MHI2119.01)

This class will delve into the commonalities and differences between the two countries: The poetic, prosaic and political influence of the time on compositional style, structure, invention and unconventionality from the “Industrial Revolution” to WWII. Some composers of note: Edward MacDowell, Ralph Vaughan Williams, Charles Ives, Amy Beach, Aaron Copland, Benjamin Britten, Henry Cowell, Roger Quilter.

Barry Bartlett

Low Fire Clay and Glazes, History & Application (CER4328.01)

This class will explore the use of low temperature clay and glazes. A large part of ceramic history is based in these materials. All early civilizations moving into the 14-century and many contemporary styles depend on low temperature material in terms of both technical and artistic style.

Students will be asked to do research into different styles and types of low fire clay and glaze. Each student will give a presentation slide lecture on the subject they choose to research. Students will then formulate and test clay and glazes and create three-dimensional pieces in the ceramic medium from the research completed.

Techniques could include low fire white and terra cotta clays, underglazing, decals and lusters. Some books will be required to be purchased as text for this course.

Barry Bartlett

Foundations in Ceramics: The Hand as a Tool (CER2105.01)

Exploring the unique, material nature of clay as a medium for personal and visual expression will be the focus of this course. All ceramic forms, whether sculptural or utilitarian require a knowledge of the basic skills and an understanding of clay. A variety of construction methods will be introduced employing hand building techniques. Emphasis will be placed on developing a personal language with the material. Formal issues such as composition, form and surface developments as well as the concerns of use and content will be addressed throughout the term in a number of diverse projects. Regular demonstrations, slide presentations and critiques will increase your exposure to the unlimited possibilities within this tradition. Students will participate in all aspects of the ceramic process including clay mixing; slip and glaze preparation; and the loading and firing of kilns.

 

Valerie Imbruce

Global Problems, Local Solutions (ENV2115.01)

The course uses environmental issues to explore how normative and empirically based arguments are used in public discourse to achieve change. We will consider how global environmental problems take on societal importance and what steps have been taken to deal with them. What is the role of science in describing environmental problems? How does ideology shape what is seen as a problem? What kinds of conflict arise in the process of defining problems and solutions? The course will focus on the American environmental movement from the 1960’s to the present day to familiarize students with the main actors and issues of the movement and to discuss change in environmental thought over time. We will focus on how individuals and groups pursue sustainable solutions through policy, grassroots organizing, research, and writing. Students in this course will be asked to confront their own ideologies about the environment and reconcile them with the knowledge gained in the course.

Valerie Imbruce
Valerie Imbruce

Agroecology (BIO4101.01)

This is an advanced course for students interested in the ecology of agricultural systems. Students will gain an in-depth understanding of inputs and outputs in agricultural systems and their relation to primary productivity, nutrient cycling, soil formation, pest control and biodiversity on farm. We will address questions like, how can animals contribute to soil fertility on farm? Can temporal and spatial crop diversity be used to manage pest and disease populations? How does tillage affect water uptake by crops? During the lab portion of the course students will undertake a self designed research project.

Corequisites: Students must also register for lab, BIO4101L.

Brooke Allen

Recent Fiction From India and Pakistan (LIT2132.01)

In this class we will look at novels and stories that have been published by Indian and Pakistani writers over the last twenty years, in the context of the history of the post-Partition subcontinent. We will read works by an array of authors, possibly including Aravind Adiga, Rohinton Mistry, Mohsin Hamid, Mohammed Hanif, Mirza Waheed, Amit Chaudhuri, H.M. Naqvi, and Amitav Ghosh.

Thorsten Dennerline

Unique Prints: 3-D Prints and Modular Works (PRI4272.01)

This course is an introduction to unique prints, or prints that are not necessarily printed as an edition. We will emphasize the making of mixed media prints using a broad range of methods from monotypes to digital prints. The class is structured around a series of projects where rigorous experimentation is encouraged.

Students will learn various non-typical printmaking methods through a straightforward format of demonstrations of techniques, hands-on experience, and critiques. Techniques will include monotype, polyester laser plates, and various transfer techniques. Additionally, we will explore the possibilities of 3-dimentional applications for prints. This can include anything from books, paper cups, matchbooks, modular installations, appropriated prints and wallpapers. We may also be collaborating on projects with other classes or universities.

 

Thorsten Dennerline

Advanced Printmaking Research and Group Exhibition (PRI4402.01)

This course is an advanced printmaking research class. Within a basic structure of critiques and discussions, students will independently pursue their own research interests in a workshop environment. Demonstrations of techniques will be given according to the needs of the class. For the past numerous years, this class has culminated in a group exhibition in a local art space. Students with experience in diverse range media are encouraged to enroll.

It is expected that all students will bring previous experience to class and thus be able to help with an interchange of ideas that will occur through attendance, presentations, critiques, participation and demonstrations. Around mid-term, students will also give a presentation of their work to the class. This is a rigorous class.

Thorsten Dennerline

Introduction to Relief Printing (PRI2105.01)

This course is an introductory level print class. Students will learn about relief printmaking through demonstrations of techniques, hands-on experience, and critiques. Techniques include but are not limited to wood cut and linoleum cut. With this simple process, we will be able to explore color printing in depth.

 

Brooke Allen

Kipling (LIT2192.01)

Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936) was the most popular poet and fiction writer of the late Victorian era. He is nowadays, in many circles, the most reviled, perceived as embodying the very spirit of British imperialism. In this class we will explore Kipling’s poetry, short stories, and a couple of longer books (probably ‘Kim’) in some depth, attempting to draw our own conclusions about his literary gifts and his place in the British canon.

This course will be offered the first seven weeks of term.

Brooke Allen

Honors Seminar: George Orwell (LIT4135.01)

Perhaps more than any other writer of his century, George Orwell (1903-1950) combined a penetrating political intelligence with significant literary gifts. In this class we will read most of Orwell’s novels (‘Burmese Days,’ ‘Keep the Aspidistra Flying,’ ‘Coming Up for Air,’ ‘Animal Farm,’ ‘1984’) and major non-fiction works (‘Down and Out in Paris and London,’ ‘The Road to Wigan Pier,’ ‘Homage to Catalonia’), along with a number of Orwell’s brilliant political and literary essays. There will be two major papers.

Mark Wunderlich

The Making of a Poem (LIT4117.01)

How are poems made? What do we mean when we say something is ‘lyrical’ or ‘poetic?’ How do poets reward readers for the gift of their attention? In this course we will read the work of the poets who will come to campus as part of Poetry at Bennington and look at the strategies they use to shape poems that are distinctive, satisfying and rigorous. We will also examine their poetic antecedents, influences and mentors as a way of understanding their work in larger contexts. Please note that this course is a two-credit, fourteen-week course meeting once a week. In addition to class time, you will be required to attend all Poetry at Bennington events.

Mark Wunderlich

Shakespeare: Comedies and Romances (LIT2215.01)

In his comedies (Much Ado About Nothing, As You Like It, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Twelfth Night, etc.) and in his late so-called ‘romances’ (Cymbeline, A Winter’s Tale, Pericles, and The Tempest), Shakespeare presents us with a vision of the stage as a place of transformation and delight, of cognition and recognition. In forests, islands, glades, and gardens, the characters lose and find their lives and loves–and the magic of play-acting, of stage-craft itself, is the medium of discovery. Students will read, discuss, and write about the plays–along the way pondering such questions as: What is Comedy? What is Farce? Why prose, and why poetry?

 

Susie Ibarra

Creative Music Ensemble (MPF2104.01)

Creative Music Ensemble will explore the practice of music that is created by Composer/Improvisers. Students will study and play music through the scores, notation systems, game pieces, structured improvisations and conceptual drawings, created by contemporary composer/improvisers such as Pauline Oliveros, Wadada Leo Smith, John Zorn, Anthony Davis, Lukas Ligeti, Ikue Mori, Susie Ibarra among others.

 

Susie Ibarra

Kulintang Gong Ensemble (MPF2027.01)

Kulintang gong music is practiced in many styles from several groups in the Philippines, northern Indonesia. Its Philippine origins were in the 14th century where it was created as royal court music in Mindanao, the Southern island of the Philippines. Many different Indigenous tribes play kulintang music in Mindanao. This ensemble will introduce the history and culture of Philippine kulintang music with a focus on Maguindanaon traditions such as the gandingan as talking gongs. The ensemble will learn performance styles, improvisation, number notation, and how to play as an ensemble on all the instruments. This class will also examine contemporary work that has been composed for Kulintang as well as compose and perform music created by students in the class. There will be a 2 hour required ensemble rehearsal each week.

Elizabeth Sherman

Diversity of Coral Reef Animals (BIO2339.01)

Coral reefs are among the most diverse, unique and beautiful of ecosystems on the planet. Alas, they are also quite vulnerable to various environmental assaults and most of the reefs on earth are in real jeopardy. Students will learn the taxonomy, identification and characteristics of the animals that live in coral reefs. We will discuss the major biological innovations that have permitted the evolution of these extraordinary ecosystems and why they are threatened now. This course can serve as a prerequisite for the one-week Field Course in Coral Reef Biology in Grand Cayman.

Kaori Washiyama

Violin/Viola (MIN4345.01)

Studies in all left-hand positions and shifting, and an exploration of various bow techniques. Students can select from the concerto and sonata repertoire, short pieces and etudes for study designed to develop technique, advance musicianship and prepare for performance.

Corequisites: Must also participate in Music Workshops (Tuesdays 6:30 – 8pm).

Elizabeth Sherman
Elizabeth Sherman

Comparative Animal Physiology (BIO4201.01)

Physiological processes of vertebrates and invertebrates are studied at the cellular, organ, organ system, and whole animal levels of organization. The unifying themes of the course are the phenomenon of homeostasis (whereby an animal maintains its organization in the face of environmental perturbations) and the relationship between structure and function. The student will examine these phenomena in the laboratory by dissection and physiological experimentation. Topics include digestion and nutrition, metabolism, gas exchange, circulation, excretion, neurophysiology.

Corequisites: Students must also register for the lab, BIO4201L.

Noah Coburn

Applying Anthropological Research Methodologies (ANT4111.01)

This course is an advanced seminar that will apply skills learned in Anthropological Research Methodologies. The class will work collectively to do a local ethnographic study. Depending upon the skills and interests of each student, the class will design a research proposal and then carry out key research techniques. Finally students will be asked to present this work in a collective piece of ethnography. Note that that students are also required to be simultaneously enrolled in Anthropological Research Methodologies and that significant course time outside of the scheduled class period may be required.

Corequisites: Student must also enroll in ANT4110.01 Anthropological Research Methodologies

Noah Coburn

Anthropological Research Methodologies (ANT4110.01)

This course is an exploration of the basic tools that anthropologists use when conducting participant-observation field research. Students will learn how to use a variety of interview techniques, focus group discussions and surveys. Workshops will provide the opportunity for students to use these techniques on topics of their own interest. Methodological and theoretical perspectives will be examined, as will methods for recording, analyzing, interpreting and writing up qualitative data. Topics including formulating research proposals and ethics will be discussed. This course is particularly encouraged for sophomores and juniors considering either study abroad or advanced work in anthropology.

Noah Coburn

The Anthropology of Religion (ANT2108.01)

This course takes an anthropological approach to the study of religion. It will look comparatively at how religion is understood in different cultures as well as studying different historical and theoretical approaches to religion. The course takes a holistic approach to religion and asks how religion is tied to such concepts as politics, kinship, gender and nationalism. It will also introduce students to a series of anthropological tools such as participant-observation research in the context of religious studies. Topics covered will include ritual, sacrifice, and expiation. Cases will come from the Middle East, Africa, Asia and the Americas.

Kerry Woods

Local Land-use History and Landscape Ecology (BIO4113.01)

Landscape ecology works across multiple scales in space and time to understand the drivers of ecosystem function and pattern in broad context. Can diversity and productivity of particular pieces of the landscape be better predicted given knowledge of spatial and historical context? How do parts of the landscape interact as sources and sinks in population dynamics of plants and animals? How do present ecological patterns reflect past land-use and environments? How should landscape interactions inform conservation management? The local landscape is ecologically diverse and complex in the history of human occupation; this course will revolve around group research projects taking advantage of this landscape-laboratory and building on data-sets developed in previous courses and projects. It will involve both historical research and intensive group and independent field-work.

Dina Janis

Science, Drama & The Power of the Inquisitive Mind (DRA2259.01)

“Measure what is measurable, and make measurable what is not so” -Galileo

“To be or not to be, that is the question” -Shakespeare

How do the worlds of science and theater connect and what do they share? What is the role of the revolutionary thinker in society? We will study a variety of dramatic texts that look at these questions, exploring the nature of the inquisitive mind and its relationship to social, cultural and political systems throughout history. Students in this class will develop scenes for presentation from a small canon of plays that include: Arcadia by Tom Stoppard, The Physicist by Friedrich Durrenmatt, Copenhagen by Michael Frayn, Galileo by Bertolt Brecht, Proof by David Aubern, and The Doctor’s Dilemma by George Bernard Shaw – among others. We will study in depth the lives and discoveries depicted in thses plays and the way in which society was impacted by these discoveries. Rehearsals of scenes outside of class, several research-based papers as well as end of term performance can be expected. Students from varied disciplines are welcome.

Corequisites: Dance or Drama lab assignment.

Kerry Woods
Kerry Woods

Forests: An Introduction to Ecology and Evolution (BIO2109.01)

New England is one of the most heavily forested regions in the United States. 14,000 years ago it was covered by ice. When humans arrived about 11,000 years ago, they found forests already established — and began reshaping the landscape through hunting and fire and, beginning about 2000 years ago, farming. European colonists caused further ecological change by expanding agriculture and bringing livestock, and by 1850 most of the region was cleared for agriculture. Most of that farmland has now become forested again. How do we understand and predict the workings of such a dynamic landscape? This course in ecology and evolution addresses adaptations of organisms in habitat and the function and history of ecological systems. We will use the forest ecosystems that dominate the New England landscape to explore general concepts of ecology and evolution, and to develop research tools that will be applicable in the study of any ecosystem. This course is for anyone interested in how ecosystems work and why they are as they are; it will also prepare students for more advanced work in ecology and evolution. There will be extensive field-work in potentially unpleasant weather; there will also be quantitative analyses. There will likely be at least one weekend field-trip.

Corequisites: Students must also register for the lab, BIO2109L.

Ginger Lin

Contemporary Chinese Culture in Music (CHI4118.01)

In this course we will explore the ways in which modern and contemporary Chinese culture is expressed in music. Using authentic materials, such as popular songs, music videos and music articles as springboards, students will communicate about current events and culture in China. Each class or every other class, students will be given a different song, video or article with a vocabulary list and grammar points for that material. Students will be expected to prepare to discuss it in Chinese with the teacher and classmates during the next class meeting.

Ginger Lin

Chinese Chan (Zen) (CHI4114.01)

Although commonly thought of as Japanese and known in America by its Japanese name, Zen, Chan Buddhism was truly made in China and was heavily influenced by Daoism. Chan has had a profound influence on Chinese and East Asian art and thought, but this philosophy remains relevant to modern life in both the East and West. Students will be introduced to the spirit of Chan through modern Mandarin interpretations of classic Chinese, Chan poems and stories. Students will explore Chan while building on their competencies in listening, speaking, reading and writing Mandarin Chinese.

Each class or every other class, students will be given a different Chan classic translated into modern Chinese along with a vocabulary list and grammar points for that reading. Students will be expected to read the text and prepare to discuss it in Chinese with the teacher and classmates during the next class meeting.

Ginger Lin

Chinese Characters and Chinese Culture (CHI2120.01)

All the children of one’s parents’ siblings are all just called cousin in English. However in Chinese there is a different word for each particular relationship. This stems from how in traditional Chinese Confucian culture each individual’s duties and obligations towards others are dictated by their relationships, with family relationships being the most important. But then in Chinese everyone is da jia, literally big family. By studying the etymology and morphology of the most basic Chinese characters students will simultaneously gain insights into traditional Chinese cultural values. This course introduces students to spoken and written Mandarin Chinese, paying particular attention to practical vocabulary and sentence patterns. Students learn the Pinyin (romanized) system of writing and to read and write the most basic Chinese characters. After they master 200 characters, students are able to create skits and write short essays about their daily lives. By the end of the term they are able to recognize up to 500 Chinese characters

Mary Lum

Markmaking and Representation (DRW2149.01)

The fundamentals of drawing are the basic tools for this investigation into seeing and translation. Using simple methods and means, the practice of drawing is approached from both traditional and experimental directions. The focus of this inquiry is on drawing from observation, broadly defined. In class drawing sessions are complemented by independent, outside of class work and occasional assigned readings. The goals of the course include the development of individual confidence in observational drawing skills, a working knowledge of the rich histories and contemporary concerns of drawing, and a practical basis for further inquiry into all the visual arts. Previous drawing experience may be helpful, but is not required of students enrolling in this course.

 

Mary Lum

Drawing Everywhere (DRW4239.01)

Interior and exterior, observed and imagined, expansive and intimate, this course revolves around drawings of all kinds of spaces. In class we examine various historical, narrative, architectural, and natural spaces through work that pushes the definition of drawing in many different directions, including drawing installation. Students complete work weekly, building a body of drawings that begins with assigned problems and allows for a breadth of interpretation and media. Research about the representation of space/place in history and in contemporary visual culture is undertaken and presented by all. The goal of this course is for students to discover and pursue individual, idiosyncratic languages for representing the world in which we live, by making drawings of, about, and in space. This is an intermediate/advanced level drawing course, and a high degree of motivation and production is expected.

 

Barbara Alfano

Italo Calvino: Narrating the Unfamiliar (ITA4213.01)

The course focuses on Calvino’s novels, Le citta` invisibili (1972); Il Castello dei Destini Incrociati (1973); Se una notte d’inverno un viaggiatore (1979); and the autobiographical Eremita a Parigi, a collection of his notes written between 1967 and 1984 when living and traveling abroad. These works narrate of odd and unfamiliar spaces, and of bizarre situations in which imagination plays the main role. Travel, but not only, relates the stories to one another. The reading of the novels will be supported by Calvino’s Lezioni Americane (1985) and by secondary, critical literature. Students will focus on creative writing to advance toward written proficiency, and so they will keep practicing complex grammatical structures, while also experimenting with tone, style, and register, and with narrative structures. By the end of term, students will produce either a short memoir, or a short story in Italian.

Felice Wolfzahn

Movement Practice: Intermediate Contact Improvisation (DAN4118.01)

For those with prior technique and/or improvisation experience. In this duet form, we communicate through the language of touch, momentum, and weight. We will explore simple solo and duet skills such as rolling, falling, balance, counterbalance, jumping, weight sharing, spirals, and tuning to our sensory input. We work with an emphasis on breath, alignment, and releasing excess muscular tension in order to allow more vital inner support to flow through the body. Throughout the classes, we combine skill work with open dancing scores in a supportive and focused environment.

Felice Wolfzahn

Movement Practice: Contact Improvisation (DAN2210.01)

Contact improvisation is a duet movement form. Two people move together, playing in physical dialogue, communicating through the language of touch, momentum, and weight. In these classes we will explore some simple solo and duet skills such as rolling, falling, balance, counterbalance, jumping, weight sharing, spirals, and tuning to our sensory input. We will work with an emphasis on breath, alignment, and releasing excess muscular tension in order to allow more vital inner support to flow through the body. Throughout the classes we will combine skill work with open dancing scores in a supportive and focused environment. Students from all disciplines are invited to join this class (including those who think they have two left feet).

Elena Demyanenko

Movement Practice: Advanced Dance Technique (DAN4344.01)

This advanced movement class will develop from simple skeletal mobility sequences to expansive movement forms. The warm-up will examine the joints and how their range of motion relates to alignment, readiness to move, and articulation. These principles will then become the foundation for traveling sequences and longer movement phrases. Distinguishing between tempo, rhythm, and phrasing will also be a priority. Our goal will be to find a way of working that makes technique central to our daily movement practice without it inhibiting our individual approaches to dancing and making work.

The aim is to help students select easier, more efficient, and more effective movement options through an in-depth examination of how they are currently organizing solutions to movement problems. During this detailed observation, students will be encouraged to witness their in-class transformation, working towards a greater range of movement and articulation.

Using tools from the Alexander Technique, Feldenkrais, Body-Mind Centering, and by addressing joints, muscles and body organs, students are offered an opportunity to find and use the relationships between the parts of the body. These relationships, clear and conscious structural connections, will enhance sensory learning and encourage idiosyncratic, virtuosic ways of moving.

Elena Demyanenko

Movement Practice: Beginning Dance Technique (DAN2214.01)

For those looking for a basic movement class. We begin with a slow warm-up focused on anatomical landmarks, muscular systems and basic alignment principles, but then progress to vigorous, rhythmic movement patterns and group forms. We work to strengthen, stretch, and articulate the body through longer movement phrases focused on weight shifting, changes of direction, and dynamic changes of energy.

We will aim for a multi-dimensional, voluminous way of moving from the internal knowing rather than from external shaping. The class will serve as a laboratory where we observe form, strength, weaknesses, habits, and patterns, and will offer a variety of movement situations: emphasizing awareness, expanding self-perception, and our ability to carry out our intentions.

Barbara Alfano

Canta che ti passa: Social Commentary in Music (ITA4117.01)

‘Canta che ti passa,’ ‘Sing and you’ll feel better,’ says an old Italian adage. Yet, Italians do not always sing to forget their troubles. Much of the Italian musical tradition expresses social and political commentary, seriously or ironically. Songs as diverse and far apart in time as Toto Cotugno’s populist ‘L’italiano’ (An Italian, 1983), Giorgio Gaber’s intellectually engaged ‘Io Non mi sento italiano’ (I’m Not Really Italian, 2003), and Nilla Pizzi’s tongue-in-cheek ‘Papaveri e papere’ (Poppies and Ducks, 1952) are equally representative of the many cultural faces of Italy. Through music, but not only, students will learn what Italians have to say about their own cultural, social, and political habits, and possibly sing along. Journal articles, interviews, advertisements, web sites, film, and videos will also be part of this course. Students will strengthen their speaking skills and become familiar with the linguistic structures that will enable them to express their viewpoints with a certain ease, developing, on the writing side, paragraph-level discourse. We will focus in particular on the use of the subjunctive and the conditional, and on the agreement of verbal tenses, while also reviewing the basic grammar covered in the first two terms of Italian. Intermediate-low level. Conducted in Italian.

Sherry Kramer

A Play Takes Place in the Audience (DRA4133.01)

A play is a unique, self organizing process which generates new states of order spontaneously out of nothing. It uses this order to create a perception shift in the audience. We will read 10 plays together to investigate the way that plays generate meaning. There will be a series of short writing exercises, and students will write a 30-60 minute play as their final project.

Sherry Kramer

Choice and Consequence: Alternative History (DRA2277.01)

“The theater is the place where we learn how to be. At its best, it is a rehearsal for the great moments of our life, including our happinesses. Love, death, we see it on stage and it prepares us for our life” -John Guare

A play is a metaphoric and empathic art form that seduces us into imaginatively making choices and suffering consequences along with the characters on stage. Every day in the real world, we watch as people make choices whose consequences are truly ours to share – some global, some local, some only in our dreams. What if we could rewrite those choices? And change what happens to our lives, our world.

We will spend a little time reading from the Alternative History canon, as well as novels and plays that reveal tragedies and comedies on page and stage. Students will then chose a person born since 1930, a public figure or a family member, research their life, identify a series of their choices and the resulting consequences, and then write a 20-45 minute play where a different choice is made, and the world, as defined by the world of the play, changes.

 

Barbara Alfano

Unlocking Italian Culture: I (ITA2106.01)

This is an introductory course in Italian that will open the door to the inner aspects of the Boot’s culture. Most of Italian social life revolves around close interpersonal relationships and attachment to places. Both aspects, for the good and the bad, shape an Italian’s day from the morning coffee to the late dinner at home and do affect an individual’s entire life. Through role play, music, film, videos, the internet, and with particular attention to advertising, you will plunge into Italian real life, understand its mechanisms, learn Italian sense of friendship, sense of humor and self-irony, passion for dressing and eating well, and the downsides of it all. You will study basic, Italian grammar. By the end of the term you will be able to carry out many everyday tasks in Italian and produce simple sentence-level discourse. Emphasis is on oral communication and performance. Introductory level. Conducted in Italian.

Wayne Hoffmann-Ogier

English as a Second Language (LIT2101.01)

Individually designed tutorials provide the opportunity to review grammar, punctuation, diction, and sentence structure with an emphasis on paragraph and essay construction. Additional work is offered in oral expression, aural comprehension, and analytical reading. Tutorials may also introduce the interpretation of literature and the writing of critical essays.

Wayne Hoffmann-Ogier

Style and Tone in Nonfiction Writing (LIT2104.01)

This introductory course focuses on the weekly writing of extended essays, including nonfiction narrative, personal essay, literary criticism, research writing, and the analytical essay. It gives particular attention to developing individual voice and command of the elements of style. The class incorporates group editing in a workshop setting with an emphasis on re-writing. It also involves the analysis and interpretation of a variety of texts and explores writing across the curriculum. The course concentrates on the effective use of logic and rhetorical patterns in developing a thesis. The schedule includes individual tutorials.

Wayne Hoffmann-Ogier

Pathways: An Introduction to Writing (LIT2110.01)

Beginning writers will explore the steps of the writing process as a path for discovery and communication. Weekly papers explore several modes of writing, including description, nonfiction narrative, and both analytical and argumentative essays. The course primarily emphasizes the art of essay construction by focusing on rhetorical patterns, by introducing research techniques, and by using critical reasoning skills to explore and to amplify ideas. The class routinely uses group editing and other collaborative techniques in a discussion setting and gives special attention to the development of editing and rewriting skills. It also sharpens analytical reading ability through careful analysis of literature. The schedule includes individual tutorials.

Noah Coburn

Cultural Localities I: Researching Culture (ANT4117.01)

This advanced research seminar offers the opportunity for the student to design an anthropological research project similar to the type encountered in anthropology graduate programs. The project allows for detailed study of a society of the world, including its culture, politics, economy, world view, religion, expressive practices, and historical transformations. The initial sessions will explore issues central to the concerns of contemporary anthropology. In the second half of the course, students will look at how anthropologists frame their mode of inquiry, how research parameters are developed, and how one goes about conducting background research in preparation for fieldwork. Each student will be asked to do a thorough review of the literature applicable to their location and topic and write at least a 25-30 page paper that will frame their future research, as well as commenting on and critiquing each other’s work.

Daniel Roberts

Movement Practice: Intermediate Ballet (DAN4217.01)

Ballet has a large presence in the field of contemporary dance, predominantly as a means of training, but also, as a point of reference for 300 years of western dance. This class will focus on classical forms and contemporary uses of ballet in dance, and will address technical function, aesthetics, placement, and virtuosity, all within the ballet vocabulary. The structure will follow a traditional form inclusive of barre, center phrases, turning, and jump work. The class aims to develop strength, flexibility, and coordination for the dancer, while addressing musicality and performance qualities.

Maria Elmer
Daniel Roberts

Movement Practice: Intermediate Dance Technique (DAN4314.01)

This class will be based in the technique developed by Merce Cunningham for the purposes of his choreographic work, and address the articulations of the spine, codified exercises, complex foot/leg combinations, and jump training. The Cunningham Technique is known for its ability to strengthen the dancer’s individual awareness of space. The class aims to enhance the dancer’s resilience when dealing with change and stillness, as well as develop complex coordinations between the torso and leg work. Musicality and rhythm are inherent to the work, and will be the nuclei of all work performed in class. Alignment, coordination, and phrasing will be the main themes of this intermediate class.

Jenny Rohn

Viewpoints Groundwork (DRA2124.01)

Viewpoints is a physical improvisational form used for training actors and creating movement for the stage. This class encourages students to explore the physical and vocal possibilities of time and space, with a specific focus on developing the capacity to be physically present, emotionally open, and free to follow creative impulses. Special emphasis will be placed on the development of listening skills and ensemble building. Coursework will cover the nine Viewpoints and their application to composition and character exploration.

Corequisites: Dance or Drama lab assignment.

Andrew Cencini
Andrew Cencini

Distributed Systems (CS4125.01)

In this class, we will, as a group, build a working distributed system from scratch, such as a web search engine, distributed file system, or peer-to-peer network. By building such a system, students will learn about key theoretical and practical fundamentals related to distributed systems, such as concurrency, replication, commit models, fault-expectancy, self-organization and management, load-balancing, capacity planning, and physical and environmental considerations. These key principles are what lie at the core of the designs of well-known systems such as built by Google, Bing, Facebook, Yahoo, Twitter and others. The class will evolve from working through the design of the system, to developing it, planning its deployment, and releasing it into the wild.

Corequisites: Student must also register for lab, CS4125L.

Andrew Cencini

Computing in the Developing World (CS2108.01)

Information and Communication Technology (ICT) can play a pivotal role in the developing world by helping to reduce poverty, broaden and equalize access to fundamental human rights, lessen environmental harm and alter environmentally harmful practices, and promote social and economic justice. ICT projects in the developing world, while often well-meaning, can also be implemented very, very wrong, or simply be misconstrued as silver bullet to the developing world’s problems. In this class, we will study the past, present and future of ICT projects for the developing world, and learn to analyze and critique projects and proposals using a framework developed from discussion of relevant literature, scenarios, outcomes and technologies. The class will also be organized around a central large-scale systems design and deployment project where students build a demonstration wireless mesh network in a simulated rural and urban environment.   This project will help familiarize students on a practical level with some of the technical, social and logistical challenges related to this area of work.

Hugh Crowl

Physics I (PHY4235.01)

Physics is the study of what Newton called ‘the System of the World.’ To know the System of the World is to know what forces are out there and how those forces operate on things. These forces explain the dynamics of the world around us: from the path of a falling apple to the motion of a car down the highway to the flight of a rocket from the Earth. Careful analysis of the forces that govern these motions reveal countless insights about the world around you and enable you to look at that world with new eyes.

Corequisites: Students must also register for the lab, PHY4235L.01.

Eileen Scully

America in the World: Past, Present, Future (HIS4204.01)

Even while responding to recent global and national events that seem unprecedented, the United States continues to confront the dilemmas running throughout its diplomatic history-national security versus individual liberties, unilateralism versus multi-lateralism, competing domestic constituencies, and conflicting visions of America’s role in the world. Newly declassified documents available from around the world provide us the opportunity to reassess conventional wisdom. In this intensive seminar, we work through primary sources across two centuries, examining the thinking, constraints, and goals of not only the formulators of foreign policy, but of those outside of official power.

Eileen Scully

Special Projects (HIS4750.01)

This course is an opportunity for students to pursue individual and collaborative interdisciplinary independent projects, whether in the exploratory phase or already underway. In early weeks, we workshop and finalize project ideas to produce individual contracts. These contracts include arrangements for each student to receive preliminary consultation on proposals and culminating review of completed work by recognized experts here in the Bennington College community or beyond. Class meetings thereafter are opportunities to learn and hone project-centered capacities, to present and discuss work-in-progress, and to consult one-on-one with the instructor. Recent projects have included sixth-term thesis proposals, seventh- and eight-term research papers, historically grounded short stories and animations, curatorial guides, and video documentaries.

Ikuko Yoshida

Japanese Aesthetics: Jomon Pottery to Superflat (JPN4216.01)

In this intermediate course, students will learn various art in Japan from potteries in the Jomon Period (About 14,000 BC – 300 BC) to Takashi Murakamis so-called superflat, a postmodern art movement, in Heisei Period (1989 -). As they learn Japanese art, they will analyze elements of Japanese aesthetics that were shared in various art forms during each period. Students will also examine what societal changes influenced the changes in art. There are numerous points in the long Japanese history that styles of Japanese art changed drastically and/or new art forms arose because of what was happening in Japan during that time. Throughout the course, students will create their own digital art archive to demonstrate their understanding of art history in Japan and why and how new art forms/movements were brought to Japan.

Students will continue to develop their linguistic and cognitive skills by investigating and researching answers to questions like: How did styles of pottery change when rice agriculture was brought to Japan from China?; How did Japanese isolation from foreign countries during the Edo period bring changes to Japanese paintings?; How did Buddhism influence Japanese art?

 

Ikuko Yoshida

Special Projects in Advanced Japanese (JPN4705.01)

This course is designed for students to research/ complete a project in their field of study/interest. In order to take this course, students are required to write a proposal of their project and be accepted by the instructor. Advanced level. Conducted in Japanese.

 

Janet Foley

Foundations of Physical Science (SCMA2104.01)

A Concise Introduction to the Principles Governing The Transformations of Matter and Energy and How They Relate to Our Environment.

Mastery of fire was just the beginning. After fire came kilns, then furnaces, then steam engines, then nuclear reactors. Since our humble beginnings, the story of the development of our species has featured a nearly ubiquitous and insatiable appetite for energy, most commonly in the form of combustible fuels and the heat they provide. But what is heat and what makes such a seemingly familiar and mundane phenomenon such a driving force for human activity? And as traditional sources of heat become scarce, what alternatives exist? These questions provide the framework for this course and the context for examining the foundations of chemical and physical science. The answers provide insights into the nature of heat, energy, and matter, their limitations and possibilities. The environmental, economic, and political challenges that face all countries are deeply intertwined with the scarcity of energy, making an understanding of how it is obtained, harnessed, and lost, of critical importance to all citizens and especially for future leaders and policy makers.

This course will include two weekly lectures with occasional lab exercises to be conducted in class, reading assignments, short papers, review assignments, and a project. Students will publicly present their project work at the end of the term.

 

Janet Foley
Janet Foley

Chemistry 1: Chemical Principles (CHE2211.01)

This class is the first of a four course sequence covering General and Organic Chemistry. Students do not need to take the entire sequence. This course will focus on introductory chemical principles, including atomic theory, classical and quantum bonding concepts, molecular structure, organic functional groups, and the relationship between structure and properties. The class will have lecture/discussion meetings at which we will critically examine the major concepts of reading assignments, discuss articles, and review some of the current developments of the field. The aim of the laboratory will be to develop your experimental skills, especially your ability to design meaningful experiments, analyze data, and interpret observations. Some background in math (pre-calculus) would be helpful.

Corequisites: Students must also register for the lab, CHE2211L.01.

Annabel Davis-Goff
Annabel Davis-Goff

War and Peace (LIT4108.01)

War and Peace, Vanity Fair, and Shirley are novels that are set during the Napoleonic Wars. Charlotte Bronte’s novel is set in a Yorkshire deeply affected by the Peninsular wars, Tolstoy describes both Napoleon’s Russian campaign and the domestic and social life of a huge range of characters, and Thackeray’s greatest novel reaches its climax with the Battle of Waterloo. Students will write two essays.

Susan Sgorbati

Solving the Impossible: Intractable Conflicts (MED2106.01)

This course is about the challenge of solving conflicts that are firmly entrenched with little hope for change. Often these conflicts repeat a pattern of violence between groups that hold fixed positions and beliefs. We will look in depth at this type of conflict, analyzing the factors that contribute to intractibility. We will then look at people like Gandhi, Martin Luther King Jr. and Nelson Mandela, who led movements that made a conscious effort to resolve conflict non-violently and broke through the fixed nature of the problems they found themselves in. Current political movements around the world have been influenced by these great leaders. They applied non-violent theories to practical action. These strategic non-violent encounters will also be explored through the lens of complex dynamic systems. Multi-party collaborative problem-solving is a capacity that is a practice of this course.

 

Maria Elmer
Michael Giannitti

Off the Page: Conceptualization and Collaboration (DRA2105.01)

The collaborative process is central to the development of most theatrical work, yet it is often first experienced when people come together to work on a project with imminent production deadlines. Students in this course will have the opportunity to experience the initial portions of the collaborative process several times over, through a series of class projects, free of the pressures of production. After initial discussion of the collaborative process itself, students will work in teams to develop conceptual approaches to a range of plays which pose substantial design challenges. Team composition will change with each project so that students will experience working with an assortment of collaborators. Groups will share the results of their exploratory work by summarizing their process and the ideas discussed, and presenting visual research and some basic sketches showing their proposed design choices. Additional group meetings will be organized outside of class. Project work will be augmented by visits from several distinguished guest artists, who will critique the group project work and discuss their successful collaborative experiences with the class.

Corequisites: Dance or Drama Lab Assignment.

Michael Giannitti

Working With Light (DRA2234.01)

Lighting design has the powerful ability to shape the experience of an audience. Its practice incorporates elements of artistry and craft and should interest those working in all aspects of visual and performing arts. In addition to hands-on work with theatrical lighting equipment in and outside of class, awareness of light, play analysis and conceptualization, color, angle, composition and focus are explored in class demonstrations and in a series of individual and group projects. Some reading and short writing assignments are also included. All enrolled should consider taking the companion course DRA 2235 Designing a Light Plot for a more comprehensive introductory lighting experience.

This course will be offered the first seven weeks of term.

Michael Giannitti

Designing a Light Plot (DRA2235.01)

As a follow-up to the course Working With Light, students in this class will learn how to merge lighting design ideas with the constraints inherent in theater spaces, scenery and lighting equipment. Design drafting will be emphasized in this course. In one major project, students will synthesize and apply material covered to develop (on paper) a complete lighting design.

Corequisites: DRA2234 Working With Light in first half of term (or a previous term). Dance or Drama lab assignment.

This course will be offered the second seven weeks of term.

Michael Wimberly

Drumming: An Extension of Language (MIN2120.01)

This course serves as an introduction to learning rhythms, chants and songs from Africa, Brazil, Cuba, Haiti, and the African Diaspora. Using percussion instruments such as, congas, surdos, pandeiro, djembe, dununba, doumbek and chekere; students will experience basic hand and stick techniques while learning to recognize drumming patterns associated with these traditional rhythms. Rhythms such as, Lamban, KuKu, Zaouli, Samba, Batucada, Yanvalu, Banda, Rhumba, and Guaguanco will be explored. The lab portion of the class examines these rhythms by discussing the language, dance, current events, mystic and religious beliefs of the people associated with these rhythms.

Michael Wimberly

Music Compositions for Dance (MHI2105.01)

Music Compositions for Dance views and reflects on landmark compositions created for dance companies and choreographers in the 20th & 21st centuries. Students will be challenged with composition and choreography assignments using traditional and non-traditional notation, graphics, texts and alternative recording approaches.

Richard MacPike

Costume Construction Studio Basics (DRA2211.01)

The goal of this course is to teach fundamental skills used every day in the construction of garments for the stage. After acquiring a variety of sewing techniques every costume technician needs, students will learn the rudiments of flat pattern manipulation and draping, enabling them to pattern and create a mock-up garment of their own design.

Dana Reitz

Noticing, Choosing and Writing to Describe (MOD2107.03)

When looking at an object, watching something moving, experiencing the sound of an occurrence, witnessing an interaction between people, or noticing the surrounding circumstance of any object or event – how do we choose what we see? What are we not choosing? And how do we attempt to speak or write about it?

Focusing on any events or objects, not intentionally art, we will practice noticing myriad aspects of them, discussing them, and writing about them. The first week will be dedicated to describing objects, motion, and sound; the second to interactions between objects, living beings, etc; the third to surrounding circumstances of events.

Students are expected to write and rewrite a series of descriptions, fully participate in exercises and discussions. Students are also expected to attend one lecture, performance, or event outside of regularly scheduled class time.

This module will be held Thursday, October 24 – Thursday, November 14. No class will be held on Thursday, October 31, due to a plan day.

Dana Reitz

Finding Form: Dance (DAN4319.01)

Looking at forms found in nature, architecture, music, drama, literature, etc., we search for examples to help formulate ideas and structures for movement-based compositional purposes. How can we as artists find form that best supports our investigations and challenges our working processes; how do we analyze, interpret and further utilize form that is inherent in work that is already being made?

Students are expected to make new movement material, develop work outside of class, teach some of the work to others, and, in return, learn material from others. They will show their compositional studies regularly, write about many aspects involved in their working processes, and draw (while observing others and while working in their own studio practices). Projects will be performed/presented in studio showings or dance workshops. Students of intermediate/advance level in the performing and/or visual arts are welcome. Attendance at Dance Workshop (Thursday 7 – 8:30 pm) is highly recommended.

Corequisites: Dance or Drama lab assignment.

Dana Reitz

Artist’s Portfolio (DAN4366.01)

Explaining art work often goes against the grain, yet artists are regularly called upon to articulate their processes, tools, and dynamics of collaboration. To help secure any of the myriad forms of institutional support including funding, venues, and engagements, artists must develop, creatively and flexibly, essential skills. Finding a public language for what is the private process of creation is an art in itself. Furthermore, understanding and discovering ways to adapt to changing economic realities is a critical component of making work; bringing the work into the world is a natural part of the artist’s process.

This course addresses basic issues involved in generating, developing, producing, and presenting art work. Students will write artist statements, press releases, biographical statements, resumes, c.v.’s, grants and cover letters; will prepare budgets, will organize promotional portfolios/videotapes; will interview each other; and will give short lecture demonstrations.

Dana Reitz

Technique, Phrasing, and Performance (DAN4321.01)

This is designed for those who have made dance work and are interested in further developing a sense of personal movement phrasing. Full attention is paid to detail, nuance, and finesse of any phrase material that is made. Students use phrasing as a way to explore compositional, technical and performance issues and consider how aspects of dance making, technique and performance directly affect and inform phrasing.

Students are expected to create and develop new phrase material of their own, teach this work to others, and rehearse outside of class. Phrases may be combined into larger dance scores that are performed in dance workshops or studio showings.

Corequisites: Must also participate in Dance workshop (Thursdays 6:30 – 8pm).

Kirk Jackson

Voice and Speech Workshop (DRA2114.01)

The human voice simultaneously communicates thought and emotion whether we will it or not. Through exercises focusing on alignment and release, breath expansion and endurance, vibration and tone, and articulation and flexibility, students will work to free, develop and strengthen their natural voice. Particular attention will be paid to diction to align clarity of thought and speech. Exercises are informed by the work of Voice & Speech pioneers Edith Skinner, Arthur Lessac, Kristin Linklater and Patsy Rodenburg. In addition, students learn IPA (International Phonetic Alphabet) and to use this tool to master Standard Speech for the American Stage or any given dialect or accent.

Corequisites: Dance or drama lab assignment.

Kirk Jackson

The Actor’s Instrument (DRA2170.01)

The craft of acting will be the main focus of this class. Through physical and vocal warm-up exercises, sensory exploration, improvisation, scene work, and extensive reading students will be asked to develop an awareness of their own unique instrument as actors and learn to trust their inner impulses where this is concerned. Extensive out of class preparation of specific exercises as well as rehearsal with scene partners will constitute the bulk of expected work. Students can expect this to amount to six hours of required rehearsal time per week. In addition students will read several plays throughout the term, as well as weekly theory handouts. The writings, exercises, and work of such theater artists as Anne Bogart, Constantin Stanislavski, Sanford Meisner, Uta Hagen, Jerzy Grotowski among others will be researched and discussed in class.

Corequisites: Dance or Drama lab assignment.

Rotimi Suberu

Comparing Political Institutions (POL2101.01)

Political institutions are the decision norms and organizations that govern political life. Academic and policy interest in such institutions is flourishing as many previously authoritarian states seek to craft their first democratic political institutions or constitutions. This basic course introduces students to major political institutions and the debates about their relative merits. Readings, assignments, and class discussions and presentations will focus on the alternative institutional structures of contemporary polities, including parliamentary and presidential systems; federal and unitary arrangements; plurality and proportionality in electoral designs; formal and informal political institutions; the nature of hybrid political systems; the challenge of institutional design in democratizing and post-conflict states; and illustrative country cases.

 

Rotimi Suberu

Civil Society in Conflict Resolution (POL4248.01)

Civil society or the arena of autonomous associational organization and activity has been credited with promoting various virtuous outcomes, including democratization, development and social peace. This course critically surveys civil societies’ roles in peacemaking and peace building. It will explore theoretical controversies on the nature and roles of civil society as well as specific examples of conflict interventions by civic associational groups. These examples will draw from case studies and experiences from around the world, including Ashutosh Varshney’s scholarly work on Hindu-Muslim conflict and civic life in India, and the practical work of The Imam and the Pastor in Nigeria.

This course will be offered the first seven weeks of term.

Rotimi Suberu

Politics and Governance in Africa (POL4237.01)

Among regions of the world, Africa is more or less unique for its large number of fragile and unstable states, poor governance, explosive social and demographic pressures, and recent hopeful economic and political transitions. This course surveys the big questions, enduring challenges, and leading theories of contemporary African politics and governance. Themes to be explored include contending scholarly perspectives on Africas developmental puzzle, the impacts of Western colonialism and major international actors and institutions, neo-patrimonial personalized rule and the criminalization of state authority, current patterns of state-society relations, the resource curse, the drivers of warfare and political violence, ongoing struggles for good democratic governance, and illustrative country case studies.

Terry Creach; Susan Sgorbati

Projects in Dance/Tool Box (DAN4483.01)

Students are invited to enter a two-part study that includes work to deepen and challenge compositional practices as well as develop a substantial dance project for the term. Classes include led improvisations and other compositional framing practices as well as in-class showings of works-in-progress (live or via video), discussions and critiques.

Students are expected to show their work regularly throughout stages of development, complete their projects, and perform them to the public by the end of the term.

Co-requisites: Dance Workshop, Dance or Drama Lab assignment.

Terry Creach

First-Year Dance Intensive (DAN2107.01)

Primarily for first-years, but for any student who has a serious interest in dance, whether or not they have previous dance experience. We will consider many aspects of dance making, including an investigation of the physical sensations and impulses that inform our moving; the development of one’s own physical awareness and movement skills; improvisational structures that test and inform our forming and moving; and tools needed for developing and performing this work. Collaborative and solo projects will be developed throughout the term, and will include a showing in Dance Workshop or in the end-of-term Studio Concert.

Corequisites: Dance Workshop (Thursdays 7 – 8:30pm). Dance or Drama lab assignment.

Nathaniel Parke

Cello (MIN4355.01)

Studio instruction in cello. There will be an emphasis on creating and working towards an end-of-term project for each student.

Corequisites: Must also participate in Music Workshop (Tuesdays, 6:30 – 8pm).

Nathaniel Parke
Bruce Williamson

Clarinet (MIN4223.01)

Study of clarinet technique and repertoire with an emphasis on tone production, dexterity, reading skills, and improvisation. This course is for intermediate-advanced students only.

Corequisites: Must also participate in Music Workshop (Tuesdays 6:30 – 8pm).

Bruce Williamson

Saxophone (MIN4237.01)

Study of saxophone technique and standard repertoire (jazz or classical), with an emphasis on tone production, dexterity, reading skills, and improvisation. This course is for intermediate-advanced students only.

Corequisites: Must also participate in Music Workshop (Tuesdays, 6:30 – 8pm).

Kathleen Dimmick

Directing II (DRA4376.01)

We will address the process of discerning a text’s dramatic potential and realizing that potential in performance by developing and implementing a directorial approach through analysis and rehearsal techniques. The term is divided between exercises and rehearsal of individual projects. The work of the course will culminate in a director’s approach essay, a rehearsal log, and an open performance of student-directed scenes.

Kathleen Dimmick

Greek Tragedy: Plays and Theory (DRA4105.01)

This course investigates the great beginning of the western dramatic tradition in fifth-century Athens. We’ll read plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides and theories of tragedy by Plato, Aristotle, Nietzsche, and Hegel. Students will write two essays.

Kathleen Dimmick

History of Theater II: Modern Drama (DRA2154.01)

This course examines the history and aesthetics of the theater, including the development of staging, production, and acting methods and styles. In the fall of 2013 we will read representative plays from the modern canon, beginning with the experiments in Naturalism in the nineteenth century through twentieth century modernism to the contemporary drama of today. Along with the plays, we’ll look at critical and theoretical essays that elucidate the historical context and dramatic conventions of these works. Students will write one essay and take midterm and final exams.

 

Bruce Williamson

Music Maps (MTH4115.01)

Time is precious. Memories are fleeting. Music is sound-in-time, so how can we most efficiently remember and teach others our musical ideas? In this course, the basics of chart writing and music notation will be explored by looking at examples of various simple maps that indicate form, melody, harmony (chord symbols) and essential rhythmic figures, then by creating our own lead sheets. Basic arranging techniques will also be examined, working with 2-part and 3-part harmony geared toward adding horn, string and/or vocal parts to one’s arrangement. Improve your ability to see what you hear and play what you see. Students should have some experience with playing and reading music (notation and/or charts).

 

Bruce Williamson

Jazz Piano Lab (MIN4335.01)

This course will utilize Bennington’s Piano Lab to explore and develop the skills and knowledge required to effectively play non-classical piano repertoire. Styles covered are: blues, reggae, salsa, bossa-nova and jazz. Students will take turns learning and playing bass lines, chord voicings, stylistic rhythms, melodies and improvised solos.

Paul Voice

The Human Condition: Hannah Arendt (PHI4101.01)

Hannah Arendt (1906-1975) was a major political theorist whose work has become increasingly influential in recent years. A student of Martin Heidegger and Karl Jaspers, her extensive writings cover such topics as the nature of power, the meaning of the political and the problem of totalitariansim. This seven-week course is a critical exploration of some of her major works, including The Origins of Totalitariansim, The Human Condition, and Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil.

This course will be offered the first seven weeks of term.

Paul Voice

Philosophy & Biography: Wittgenstein (PHI4105.01)

Ludwig Wittgenstein is one of the most influential and important of twentieth century philosophers and one of its most enigmatic characters. In this course you will read two of Wittgenstein’s central works, Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus and Philosophical Investigations. We will arrive at a detailed understanding of Wittgenstein’s philosophy, its themes, arguments and development. Alongside this philosophical journey you will read various biographies, memoirs, and fictionalized biographies of Wittgenstein’s life as well as viewing Derek Jarman’s film on the life of Wittgenstein. We will examine the connection between Wittgenstien’s life and his philosophy.

Paul Voice

Philosophical Reasoning (PHI2109.01)

What is the difference between belief and knowledge? What makes me the same person now and in the future? Is there a purpose in life? These are some of the questions this first course in philosophy asks. It has two aims: To introduce you to the methods and procedures of philosophical argument and, second, to engage you in a critical dialogue with three central problems in philosophy – knowledge, personal identity, and meaning in life.

Kitty Brazelton

Groundwork: What You Need to Know to Make Music (MFN2110.01)

You may or may not play an instrument. It doesn’t matter. What matters is how you think, how you hear, how you communicate, and your willingness to adapt that knowledge to the musical field. We will learn to listen to music, talk about music, improvise music, write music, write about music, read music, and read about music, but most of all we will learn to collaborate to make music unique to the class and the individuals in it. No matter what your background, come prepared to play.

Corequisites: Must participate in Music Workshop (Tuesday, 6:30 – 8pm). Students must also register for the lab, MFN2111. Two-hour small-group music labs will be scheduled after the first week.

Kitty Brazelton

America’s History Through Her Music: 1500-1900 (MHI2103.01)

Start with the tributaries: European, African, then Caribbean. Trace these forward in great whorls, mingling currents in a hard-rushing river. For instance, chamber music from Germany in the Pennsylvania countryside was venerated by the High Anglican merchants in Philadelphia and the gentlemen farmers further south. And while those noble white gentlemen listened in parlors to their imports, hambone and ring shout replaced forbidden West African drums in the slave barracks, giving way to Gospel when sons of New England fishermen came preaching the Great Awakening. Black Gospel is Pilgrim hymn. Appreciation of the sonata da camera has always denoted high social standing, here in America. And a hundred years before John Brown, you could hear the Civil War coming if you knew what to listen for.

 

Christopher Lewis
Rebecca Godwin

Practicum: National Undergrad Literary Anthology (LIT4360.01)

This two-credit course will focus on reading, selecting, and editing material for plain china, an on-line literary anthology featuring the work of undergraduate students across the country. The work will result in monthly on-line publication. We’re looking for reader/editors in poetry, fiction, and nonfiction; interest in art direction and computer knowledge welcome. This course will be conducted almost entirely on-line, via Skype and Google Docs. Plenty of work for two credits, it’s also plenty rewarding.

Sarah Harris

The Creation of Spain’s Image: Myths & Archetypes (SPA4102.01)

The Spanish philosopher José Ortega y Gasset once remarked of his compatriots, ‘We prefer the lively sensation of things to the things themselves.’ This course will focus on these ‘lively sensations,’ national myths of Spain that may or may not maintain much direct connection to the original ‘things themselves.’ National myths contain symbolic cultural significance and can affirm or set shared values. In Spain, throughout many centuries, people have exalted figures and events as representative of national values, or as part of an attempt to project a particular image within or beyond the nation’s borders. In our exploration of this topic, we will examine such media as newspapers, television news reports, political posters, history books, music, film, photographs, and brief works of literature. The focus of the course will be on student-generated discussion and critical thinking about these media, but practice in all four major areas of language (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) will be essential. Students will learn to defend their own ideas in spoken and written language, and we will explore grammatical and linguistic questions as they arise naturally in our classroom. Intermediate-low level. Conducted in Spanish.

Randall Neal

Advanced Projects in E-Music (MCO4139.01)

This course will focus on composition in the electro-acoustic medium. Students may choose to develop their technical skills in any of the following areas: sound synthesis, digital signal processing, digital audio recording and surround sound 5.1 spatialization.

Students are expected to complete an electro-acoustic composition in surround sound to be presented in concert at term’s end. Students are also expected to complete short readings, participate in class discussions and to present their creative work on a regular basis in class sessions. An intermediate to advanced level tutorial.

Randall Neal

Electronic Music: Creativity and Sound (MCO2109.01)

How do you compose when any sound can be used in music? This course provides a wide-ranging exploration into strategies for sound-based composition and the digital transformation of sound. Students will create original sounds and compositions in the electronic music studio. Students are expected to complete short readings, participate in discussions, present their creative work on a regular basis in class sessions and complete two studio projects. The afternoon lab session will cover digital audio recording, digital signal processing, and compositional practice in the electronic music studio.

Nathan Botts

Brass Chamber Ensemble (MPF4237.01)

The Brass Ensemble, directed by Nathan Botts explores the wide breadth of music and expression available to instruments made of brass. From antiquity, where the terrifying sounds of brass instruments heralded war and communicated power, to the gaudy wobble of medieval dance music; the beautiful introspection of renaissance wind music, or the beautifully ornamented architecture of baroque music; the melodic balance of classical music — we’ll explore brass music as it developed using original scores when applicable, or arrangements as necessary. Additionally, we’ll explore brass music in its most contemporary forms, including the jazz/funk street bands of New Orleans and the rhythmically twisted Roma bands of Eastern Europe.

Corequisites: Must also participate in Music Workshop (Tuesdays, 6:30 – 8pm).

Allen Shawn

Music Composition Intensive (MCO4801.01)

Students who wish to study composing intensively may be eligible for a small group tutorial or where appropriate, individual lessons. In general, students taking this course are expected to compose in longer forms and with more varied instrumentation than previously attempted. This course may be taken at the intermediate or advanced level.

Michael Bisio
Sue Rees

Animation Projects (MA4201.01)

The course is for advanced animation students who have clearly defined a specific project. The project could include an animation to be completed in the semester, or preparatory work for an animation to be completed in the Spring 2014 semester; preparatory work could include drawings, model building, puppet construction.

The students are expected to have undertaken research prior to the start of the class.

This course will be offered the second seven weeks of the term.

Sue Rees

Ways to Manipulate the Two-Dimensional World (MA4102.01)

The class will be concerned with creating short animations utilizing two dimensional imagery. The animations will be created using both software and a MultiPlane Camera;MultiPlane set ups have been used for animators from Lotte Reiniger to Norman McLaren, Disney to Martha Colburn.

The software programs used will be primarily After Effects, DragonFrame and Photoshop. Additional experimentation will occur utilizing a laser cutter to create silhouettes.

The subject matter for the first half of the semester will be based upon current affairs.

The first half of the term will be concerned with experimenting in ways to manipulate two-dimensional imagery. The second half of the term will be working in more depth, utilizing the techniques learnt, to create a short animation.

Sue Rees

Puppets and Animation I (MA2325.01)

The class will be concerned with animating inanimate objects by stop motion, drawings, and cut out collages. A variety of filmmakers and techniques will be looked at during the course of the semester. Students will be expected to produce a variety of short projects followed by a longer more sustained project based on current events and environmental issues. Students will be instructed in using ‘Dragonframe’ Software, the Multiplane process, and video editing software.

Corequisites: Students must also register for MA2137, History of Animation.

Sue Rees

History of Animation (MA2137.01)

We will study past and present styles of animation, and examine animations from the 1800’s through to the present. Early devices used to create moving images, through to contemporary artists and production companies such as The Brothers Quay, William Kentridge, Aardman Productions, and Pixar, will be investigated. The class will consist of film screenings, primarily focusing on the techniques used and how inventions influenced the creative process of the animators.

 

Music Faculty

Sage City Symphony (MPF4100.01)

Sage City Symphony is a community orchestra which invites student participation. The Symphony is noted for the policy of commissioning new works by major composers, in some instances student composers, as well as playing the classics. There are openings in the string sections, and occasionally by audition for solo winds and percussion. There will be two concerts each term.

Kitty Brazelton
Kaori Washiyama
Nathan Botts

Brass Instruments (MIN4218.01)

Individual instruction for brass players (including trumpet, French horn, trombone, and tuba). Strategies will be developed for each student to enhance their technique and musicianship. Course work will include the study and practice of music in a variety of styles including baroque, classical/romantic, contemporary, and jazz/improvisation, depending on the level and specific interests of the student. The physical and technical aspects of brass playing will be developed through the regular practice of various exercises. At least one public performance is required each term.

Corequisites: Must also participate in Music Workshop (Tuesdays 6:30 – 8pm)

Kitty Brazelton

Sacred Harp College (MPF4125.01)

For experienced Sacred Harpers only. You must be familiar with Sacred Harp repertoire and know how to lead from the ‘hollow square’. We will focus on learning to teach and key Sacred Harp. And we will always sing. Attendance will be the only criterion for evaluation.

 

Kitty Brazelton

Sacred Harp Singing School (MPF2100.01)

We meet once a week for singing school. We sit in a hollow square. Altos, north. Trebles, east. Basses, west. And the tenors, who lead from the south. Many songs in the Sacred Harp tunebook, published by two Georgians in 1844, tell of death and salvation. But there are social tunes, about Buonaparte, old mother, rambling and roving, or singing school itself. Most of our tunes date back to 1780 – 1800 named after the New England congregations where they began, back when the North still had psalm-tune schools and composers. The shape-note – diamond, rectangle, oval, triangle – system we use, invented in 1801, has taught generations of Americans to sing without formal training. Our singing recalls the days when church music was sung by all. We sing for the joy of it. Loud is good and louder is better. We don’t perform. We sing as an end in itself.

Corequisites: Attendance at off-campus public singings. Date, time (usually on weekends during the day) and frequency TBA.

John Kirk

Traditional Music of North America (MHI2135.01)

This course explores music from early native music through contemporary singer-songwriters. Some of the traditions we draw from include African, Native American, Quebecois, Appalachian, Irish and Scottish, British Isle traditions, Cajun, Blues, Gospel, and Conjunto music. Instrumental, dance, and ballad traditions are explored. Students must bring a guitar, banjo, mandolin, or fiddle (or other social instrument) to class for purposes of furthering personal music making through traditional forms. We will practice and perform as a group, improving our reading and aural skills. Other instruments are possible, but the students must discuss this with the instructor.

John Kirk

Mandolin (MIN2229.01)

Beginning, intermediate, or advanced group lessons on the mandolin will be offered. Student will learn classical technique on the mandolin and start to develop a repertoire of classical and traditional folk pieces. Simple song sheets with chords, tablature, and standard notation, chord theory, and scale work will all be used to further skills. Student will be expected to perform at Music Workshop, or as part of a concert, in ensemble and/or solo.

John Kirk

Fiddle (MIN4327.01)

For the experienced (2+years of playing) violinist. Lessons in traditional styles of fiddling – Quebecois, New England, Southern Appalachian, Cajun, Irish, and Scottish. This tutorial is designed to heighten awareness of the variety of ways the violin is played regionally and socially in North America (and indeed around the world these days) and to give practical music skills for furthering personal music making. Students will be expected to perform at Music Workshop, or as part of a concert, in ensemble and/or solo.

Corequisites: Must also participate in Music Workshop (Tuesdays, 6:30 – 8pm).

John Kirk

Banjo (MIN2215.01)

Beginning, intermediate, or advanced group lessons on the 5-string banjo in the claw-hammer/frailing style. Student will learn to play using simple song sheets with chords, tablature, and standard notation. Using chord theory and scale work, personal music-making skills will be enhanced. Awareness of traditional styles of playing the instrument will be furthered through a listening component and ensemble playing with other instrumentalists. Student will be expected to perform at Music Workshop, or as part of a concert, in ensemble and/or solo.