Archives

The 5 Threads of Participatory Organizing in the Workplace: Practical Applications and Prototypes (APA2243.02)

For more than a century, assumptions about how the workplace is best organized to optimize production or profits have not been challenged – and neither has the definition of ‘value’. It’s clear that the ‘workplace of the future’ is not the workplace of the past. Whether through automation, decentralization, or an intention to grow awareness of the workplace as a dynamic psycho-social entity, the opportunity exists to start practicing the skills and capacities that will bring about the human future of work. This course offers a practical exploration of the hypothesis that 5 elements are necessary to build and nurture to unleash the potential of the collective: Making Decisions, Building Connection, Allocating Resources, Gathering Together, and Coordinating Action. In the two-day workshop, participants will have an authentic experience of each of these five threads’ and create prototypes to explore over the ensuing virtual sessions. Source material will include Better Work Together: How the Power of Community Can Transform your Business (published by the Enspiral Foundation) among others.

Life Design Ecosystems: Building Community Beyond Bennington (FWT4102.02)

The dynamically changing environment of the world of work, uncertainties tied to meaningful employment, and the flexible/creative ways people have responded will be discussed in combination with the goal of taking proactive measures in expanding meaningful relationships and networks in your professional and creative endeavors. The goal for this class is to provide a platform for students to bridge a series of philosophical inquiries in the world of work and the pragmatic steps that it takes to expand one’s social networking spheres when inquiring about and applying for positions in your respective fields. Additionally, your reflection process and the action steps taken in exploring networking as a tool for embedding yourself in a respective field will run in tandem with guest speakers/industry leaders who will share their process points and the challenges they navigated in their respective life paths/careers. The course will draw from anthropological studies in social networking and readings from the sociology of work as key starting points for encouraging students to reflect on how their academic/FWT pursuits at Bennington can serve as an informed transitional point for preparing for their own life after college.

Life Design Narration: Representing & Contextualizing Your Work (FWT4101.01)

Field Work Term preparation has provided a platform for applying to opportunities with resumes and cover letters as key components of the internship application. While opportunities during FWT serve as a moment to test and explore inquiries introduced in the classroom, how do students best represent and contextualize this relationship through job application materials created in preparation for graduation? How do students bridge ideas explored in class, the skill sets developed in the field, and work/life aspirations after college utilizing language pertinent to particular employment sectors? Lastly, how do you represent your liberal arts educational background in ways that highlight the value of an interdisciplinary education while representing your work within the targeted frame of your respective fields of interest? In addition to readings tied to the sociology of work, studies on bias in job application evaluation, and editorial pieces on contemporary issues facing newly graduated students to name a few, the course will primarily focus on unpacking and producing resume and cover letter drafts through an iterative and reflective process.

Climate Under Siege: Public Policy Forums@CAPA (APA2179.01)

Whether it’s in your community, your state, your country or in the world, understanding the impacts of global warming and how to participate in future policy decisions has become an essential role of the citizen.  This Fall 2019’s Public Policy Forum @ CAPA presents an opportunity to learn from policy makers, academics, and leading thinkers and activists on many aspects of the climate crisis from energy and food to water, and soils. 

Beyond the Boss: Organizational Models for the 21st Century (APA2247.02)

Almost all work in the world is performed in groups and all groups involve some kind of organization. Whether it’s a fast-food restaurant, a band, an activist group, or even a college class, we investigate ideas of organization — often invisible — that we picked up from somewhere: families, teachers, bad bosses, and/or movies just to name a few. This course offers the opportunity to survey recent non-traditional organizational concepts from both the business and non-profit world. Since a genuinely critical examination of organizations cannot occur in the absence of lived experience, we will use the class itself as a laboratory for exploring questions such as what does it mean to work without a boss, what is the role of facilitation and negotiation, and how can we use organizations as a vehicle for individual development. Source material will include Reinventing Organizations by Frederic Laloux, the work of Robert Kegan and Lisa Lahey (Immunity to Change, An Everyone Culture) among others.

(September 24, 27, October 1, 4, 8, 11)

Visual Arts Lecture Series (VA2999.01)

Each term, Bennington offers a program of five-six lectures by visiting arts professionals: artists, curators, historians and critics, selected to showcase the diversity of contemporary art practices. Designed to enhance a broader and deeper knowledge of various disciplines in the Visual Arts and to stimulate campus dialogue around topical issues of contemporary art and culture, these thematically connected presentations offer students the opportunity to explore ideas from multiple perspectives over the course of the term. Students registered for this series must attend all lectures on Tuesday evenings at 7:00pm as well as gallery exhibitions, and are responsible for taking notes and completing a one-page essay-questionnaire for each event to be submitted via Populi. Optional readings and additional opportunities for engagement with visiting speakers may be announced throughout the term.

Sing (MUS2148.01)

We will gather once a week to sing rounds, chant, chorales, work songs, protest songs, sea chanteys, Sacred Harp, and folk songs from around the world. The words are less important than the joy of singing as a community. No performances- evaluation is by attendance only. We will use our ears and simple notation to learn the music- no previous singing experience is necessary.

Sage City Symphony (MPF4100.01)

Sage City Symphony is a community orchestra which invites student participation. The Symphony is noted for the policy of commissioning new works by major composers, in some instances student composers, as well as playing the classics. There are openings in the string sections, and occasionally by audition for solo winds and percussion. There will be two concerts each term.

Bennington County Choral Society (cancelled)

The Bennington County Choral Society, a community chorus conducted by Cailin Marcel Manson, promotes choral singing by presenting several concerts per year, and eagerly invites student participation. Auditions are not required, and singers of all levels and abilities are welcomed. To receive credit, students must attend all rehearsals and performances. Performances may be held at various locations in Bennington, and transportation may need to be arranged. Contact Kerry Ryer-Parke for more information.

Sewing Fundamentals (DRA2130.01, section 1)

Students will learn the basics of sewing. Included will be various hand stitches used in garment construction and repair as well as learning how to use a sewing machine.

Sewing Fundamentals (DRA2130.02, section 2)

Students will learn the basics of sewing. Included will be various hand stitches used in garment construction and repair as well as learning how to use a sewing machine.