Archives

Beginning Guitar (MIN2247.02, section 2)

Introduces the fundamentals of acoustic guitar playing, including hand positions, tuning, reading music, major and pentatonic scales, major, minor, and seventh chords, chord progressions, blues progressions, and simple arrangements of songs.

Corequisites: Must participate in Music Workshop (Tuesday, 6:30 – 8pm).

Jazz Ensemble (MPF4250.02, section 2)

This ensemble will perform a wide range of Jazz music (a genre that is constantly evolving), with an emphasis on both ensemble playing and improvisation skills. By playing together, students will learn how blues, swing, Latin, and rock elements have all fueled this music called jazz. Students will also learn how major Jazz artists such as Ellington, Monk, Mingus, Wayne Shorter, Ornette Coleman and others have approached composition. As a group we will explore different techniques for playing over chord changes and ways to make improvised solos more interesting, both harmonically and rhythmically. Whether playing a jazz standard, a student composition, or free music, the emphasis will be on listening and on interacting with each other, finding ways to create blend, groove, dynamic contrast, and tension/release. Students will also be encouraged to bring in arrangements, transcriptions, and compositions, which will be read and developed by the ensemble. Students need to have adequate technique on a musical instrument, be able to read music and have a basic understanding of harmony (chord structures, chord-scales, etc.)

Ethical Community Collaborations (APA2161.02)

This course uses case studies from socially-engaged art projects along with in-class work and research on how to collaborate with specific communities in an ethical, mutually beneficial way. We will explore how to use a strategic planning process, transparent communications and realistic expectations around time and money in partnerships that cross boundaries of race, class, geography, gender identity or age. Together we will map out a framework to help artists make gracious invitations, equitable agreements, stable and resonant artistic productions and build lasting relationships after the show or exhibition ends.

In-class work focuses on effective listening and communications, conflict resolution and sharing power. Students will work together to begin envisioning their own collaborative projects, make effective invitations to the communities they want to engage, and begin planning for how to work together.

Field Course in Coral Reef Biology (BIO4239.01)

Coral reefs are among the most diverse, unique and beautiful of ecosystems on the planet.  Alas, they are also quite vulnerable to various environmental assaults and most of the reefs on earth are in real jeopardy.  In order to gain a more robust understanding of reefs, we will study reefs on site in the Caribbean. Students will learn the taxonomy, identification and characteristics of the animals that live in coral reefs.  The course will take place on the island of Grand Cayman. Students will have an opportunity to become certified scuba divers and participate in ongoing research. Students will collect and analyze fish inventory data and submit those data to the environmental organization, REEF (Reef Environmental Education Foundation).  Students will be able to compare their data with prior research. We will also discuss reef ecology with Tim Austin a research scientists with the Cayman Islands Department of the Environment. We will also participate in a beach clean-up activity.

This course will be offered over FWT (Jan. 4-11, 2020). Credits earned will count towards the credit requirements for Spring 2020. Registered students will receive a partial waiver for the number of hours normally required during FWT. 

Additional costs will be associated with this course.

Piano Lab I (MIN2232.03, section 3)

Introductory course in basic keyboard skills. Topics include reading notation, rhythm, technique, and general musicianship.

Modern Guitar (MIN4224.01)

Individual training is available in jazz, modern and classical guitar technique and repertoire, song accompaniment (finger style), improvisation, and arranging and composing for the guitar. Course material is tailored to the interests and level of the individual student.

Corequisites: Attendance at Music Workshop (Tuesday, 6:30 – 8:00 pm).

Beginning Guitar (MIN2247.01, section 1)

Introduces the fundamentals of acoustic guitar playing, including hand positions, tuning, reading music, major and pentatonic scales, major, minor, and seventh chords, chord progressions, blues progressions, and simple arrangements of songs.

Corequisites: Must participate in Music Workshop (Tuesday, 6:30 – 8pm).

Social Kitchen Ceramics Lab (APA2219.01)

Social Kitchen project links a community service organization (Greater Bennington Interfaith Community Services or GBICS) and local residents with students, staff and faculty of Bennington College through various workshops and collective activities that includes the fundraising supper, 2019 Empty Bowls Bennington. To achieve high volume production of ceramic bowls which will be used at the fundraiser, a series of weekend ceramics workshop sessions will be conducted in studios where diverse and cross-generational population of local residents and Bennington College students can work collaboratively. These Saturday sessions also require students’ participation in the community lunch discussions which topics focus on local and global issues in the context of food studies. On some Saturdays students will work at Kitchen Cupboard, a food distribution program of the GBICS. This Lab is a space for on-site collective leaning and it aims to further our sustainable community building.

For ceramics production, the workshops will mainly teach hand-building techniques. Previous experience in ceramics is not required but a high level of commitment in the weekly production schedule is expected. 

(September 14, 21, October 5, 12, 26, November 2, 9)

2019 Empty Bowls Bennington event is tentatively scheduled for Sunday, November 17 5- 8 pm.

Corequisites: All students must also register for Social Kitchen: Ceramics, Food and Community (APA2269.01).

**When you register for Social Kitchen: Ceramics, Food and Community (APA2269.01) online, the Registrar’s Office will register you in this corequisite course on Wednesday, May 15**

Tablescape: Production Lab (CER4109.01)

This class is structured for students who have knowledge, experience and skills in Architecture, Sculpture, and 3D design technology and wish to explore production of ceramics functional ware by developing mold making skills and applying slip casting methods to their projects. Students who are enrolled in the advanced level of slip casting class, Tablescape: Slip Casting Project for Communal Kitchen, can expand their scope of research and development and commit to rigorous mass production. Ceramics students can also explore collaborative, cross-disciplinary approaches with students or professionals who do not have technical proficiency in plaster mold making, ceramic casting material preparation, glaze application and firing. We will imagine a specific social and cultural context of communal eating to conceive design, produce and put them in use. First class project will start with a design and production of ceramic ware for a new common’s café. Some adequate molds that are produced in this class will become a property of Ceramics area for collective use to support Social Kitchen and other Bennington College community engagement projects in the future. Work in dialogue with students from the Advance Architecture project: Place: Setting – the Dining Room will be facilitated.

Animation Projects – Pre-Production Class (MA4026.02)

This class is a pre-production for a future project whether for a projection, an animation or installation. Research will be undertaken, with this research presented.

A catalogue of images, materials objects, and storyboarding along with creating a short tests for a longer project will be completed by the end of the term. Various situations, and presentation formats and locations will be discussed.

A project already started can be included in the class with permission of instructor.

The River, The Forest, The Glacier: Classics of American Environmental Literature (LIT4139.02)

How to take measure of place is a question that has long resonated in the American imagination, and thiw course considers both the geography and the voices that provide the foundation for current environmental writing. The Exploration of the Colorado River and its Canyons by John Wesley Powell, The Maine Woods by H. D. Thoreau, and Travels in Alaska by John Muir offer occasion to discuss the sublime, scientific discovery, and emerging ideas of the value of nature. A transcendentalist, Thoreau also appraised the natural world as a surveyor; the purpose of Powell’s river journey was geographic and geologic documentation, yet hardship made it something very different; and if Muir found the imprint of god’s hand across the natural world, he was also an early advocate of biocentric equality.  Students will be asked to consider how scientific inquiry and a view to the sublime coincided in the thinking of these writers; and explore those ways in which their divergent perspectives are the groundwork for American understanding—and misunderstanding—of our relations with the natural world.

Corequisite: Students are required to be in attendance at all Literature evenings and Poetry at Bennington events in the second half of the term (most Wednesday evenings at 7:00pm).

Design from Nature (DRA4236.01)

This is a class for students interested in Costume Design. We will work with inspiration from the natural world to design clothing, one example being Christian Dior’s ‘Tulip line’ of 1953.

Students should be confident about their ability to express ideas in a graphic platform and medium, and interested in expanding their understanding of clothing design. The classic tools for costume design are pencil and watercolor on paper, but we may work in and explore various methods of expressing your ideas in class.

Charles Schoonmaker
W 4:10-6:00 (new time as of 5/13/19)
This course is categorized as All courses, Drama, Updates.

Sounding Physics (MCO4113.02)

This class focuses on using simple mechanical devices (dc motors, solenoids, or vibration) to elicit sounds from myriad physical materials. We’ll discover the innate characteristics of materials themselves and manipulate forces that activate them, such as gravity, elasticity, tension, and friction. The class will workshop approaches to creating devices through the use of buttons, switches and sensors, as well as with microcontrollers or microcomputers such as Arduinos. Embracing a scrappy DIY ethos, we’ll harvest discarded materials and uncover the acoustic and poetic potential of the humble and overlooked. We will also look at concepts of precariousness and how they inform strategies for sound installations and performances. At the end of the term we will stage a performance and/or installation with our new instruments.

Ideas Arrangements Effects (APA2178.02)

How do we come to understand what we are doing when attempting to change or interfere with a messy complex social problem? How can we know if the thing we want to do to improve a social problem will work or backfire? There are many lessons from psychiatrists like RD Laing to cultural heroes like Hermès on this topic. Ideas Arrangements Effects will overview several lessons from a variety of schools of practice of solving human centered social problems. The course will help socially engaged artists find where their own thought habits and beliefs can get in the way of their attempts to improve social problems. The class will also offer students a genealogy of the schools of thought that informed the Design Studio for Social Intervention’s take on addressing social problems. As part of the course, students will set a problem they are intending to address and use the class as a design intensive to devise their own social intervention.

DS4SI’s book, Ideas Arrangements Effects would be the primary text, supplemented with readings that were critical in shaping our take on design and social change.

Investing in Futures: The Art of Worlding (APA2218.02)

Futures studies—also known as futurology—has been used by businesses and the military as part of a strategic planning toolkit. This framework of speculating about the future in systemic ways has been adopted by many contemporary artist collectives, in order to challenge assumptions of the present about outcomes in the future. These futuristic models are based on constraints—design limitations— that can spark wild imaginaries liberated from business-as- usual predictions. In this 7-week workshop we will create possible future scenarios in the forms of invented artifacts, writing, and framing devices. The features of these futures will draw from Investing in Futures, the artist-created constraint-design card deck (Mattu/Rothberg/Zurkow) which explores topics such as governance, living conditions, food, climate, technology, and range from possible to absurd.

In weeks 1-5, students in group collaborations will design and prototype pieces of specific future scenarios. In weeks 6-7 students will focus on collectively designing a futuristic EPCOT- like exhibit, which will be open to the community.

References and readings about future scenario design thinking, speculative design, and design fiction will also be explored in class. Learning outcomes: Introduction to futurology, speculative design, and systems thinking. Students will participate across media in constraint-based design, writing, and prototyping in a variety of media in rotating groups.

Creating Field Guides to Bennington (APA2217.01)

In this 7-week workshop we will uncover aspects of Bennington, perform research, tell stories, and design booklets using the familiar form of the field guide. A field guide is a manual used to identify things (birds, trees, minerals and more) in their natural environment. It follows certain rules, such as an identification system, a grammar, a map, and a how-to use section. All of these structured “conventions” are designed to encourage participation. Because its form is recognizable, one can employ the field guide format to do all kinds of things in the world. For instance, there are field guides to civic participation, stereotypical high school types, and artisanal cheese.

With the Bennington campus and/or the town as our “field,” students will individually identify, design (or create) and produce a printed field guide to a system that is present in this environment. Focuses could include campus waste, town heroes, local ghosts, the library and more. As a group, these guides will form a collection of uniquely expressive, artistic approaches to the idea of “field guide,” while following tight constraints. In addition, students will observe participants using their field guides, and conduct public tours. In order to enlist a public, students must answer a fundamental question about participatory design: “What do you want your field guide to DO?”

Class final: Students will user test their field guides on the campus and in the area. Final printed guides will be submitted to the Crossett library. Learning outcomes: Students will be introduced to systems thinking, constraint-based design, semiotics, and participatory design, and will conduct research, play-testing, zine production, interface and graphic design.

Advanced Voice (MVO4401.02, section 2)

Advanced study of vocal technique and the interpretation of the vocal repertoire, designed for advanced students who have music as a plan concentration and to assist graduating seniors with preparation for senior recitals. Students are required to study and to perform a varied spectrum of vocal repertory for performance and as preparation for further study or graduate school. A class maximum of five voice students will meet for one-hour individual or semi-private session/coachings with the instructor each week (to be scheduled with the instructor). Students will also have an individual half-hour session with a pianist each week to work on repertory.

Corequisites: Attendance and participation in Music Workshop (Tuesday, 6:30 – 8pm).

Life Drawing Lab (DRW2118.01)

Drawing Lab provides an opportunity for student artists of all experience levels to further develop their skills with observational-based drawing. Working primarily with the human figure, students build increased understanding of the poetic, dynamic, and inherently abstract nature of drawing, while paying close attention to the potential of formal elements such as shape, line, form, and the creation of pictorial space. Although each class period provides structures and activities within which students work, the ultimate aim of this class to allow students the time and space necessary to further develop their drawing skills so as to best support individual projects and concerns. Class time is divided between drawing from life, discussing student work, and examining the use of the figure in visual art, using both contemporary and historical examples. Please note that this course may require additional materials to be purchased by the student.

Note: Much of this class will be spent drawing the nude human form.

Practicing Discernment in Social Practice Art (APA2177.01)

How do you discern if your desired social practice art project is ethically sound as well as aesthetically relevant? This class will survey a series of social practice art projects, from high profile “art world” ones to small community-generated gestures, with the goal of evaluating if the project was properly thought through ethically and aesthetically. The class will also include diverse perspectives from the field of social practice art, social activism and art / literary criticism. The goal is not to supply students with a simple framework as much as it is to surface debates about the ways intended or unintended social practice art could exploit the populations or communities it intends to benefit.

Organizational Structure & Enterprise Law (APA2175.02)

The common startup mythologies tend to promote the glamor of entrepreneurship. You will work hard in a basement or a garage with no money, but the brilliance of your idea will make you into a heroic (wind-swept) figure to whom investors, customers, and clients (and the popular press) will all be irresistibly attracted. These stories don’t map to reality for most.

In contrast, you need to get out of the garage, think more creatively so that you are adequately capitalized and can attract the talent you need for your enterprise development team. Competition and sustainable growth in the 21st century are enormous challenges which require your creativity and passion. They also require innovation, an equitable organizational structure, and a functional understanding of the regulations and law which either empower your enterprise to acquire (a) the capital in amounts and forms you can best utilize, (b) promote equity in compensation and ownership within your organization, and (c) maintain sufficiently control over the goals and direction of your venture.

During this 7-week course, we will quickly review and interrogate all common legal organizational form choices. We will then examine better choices in organizational legal form, their character and details, and learn how to create and utilize them and how they optimize and facilitate your ability to raise capital (which you will likely have to do over and over again). We will examine organizational designs which meet compensation equity and employee ownership goals, build the competitive and re-invention capacities of an enterprise, enable collaborative management and control, and sustainability. You will create your own innovative design and apply it to the preceding set of outcome metrics as part of the course.  Further, we will examine pertinent enterprise law and regulation, like Reg. CF (Crowdfunding) and OPO (Online Public Offering) requirements and adapt our choices in organizational design and structure to make those options available.

The Glaze Renovation Project (CER4216.01)

The emphasis of this course will be placed on testing and cataloging the new glaze palette developed in the spring of 2019 in “Glaze-Redesigning the Ceramic Studio’s Glazes.” We will concentrate on layering the new ^04 and 10 glazes over one another as well as with the studio’s slips and washes and creating a comprehensive reference for use by all the proceeding ceramics classes to aid in surface selection. The results will be recorded both physically with a series of test tile palettes displayed in the glaze lab and digitally using HyperGlaze software. Color and surface variation of the ^10 and ^04 base glazes will also explored and, using the testing systems developed previously, we will construct a ^6 pallet to endow the ceramic’s studio with a full complement of all the major firing temperatures. The ^6 and 10 glazes will also be tested in the various atmospheric conditions that we have available to us including oxidation, reduction, salt, soda, and wood and recorded with the test tile palettes. Some possible subjects for additional exploration are raku, crater, crawl, and crystalline glazes among other possibilities. The class objectives will be facilitated through demonstration and hands-on practice. The overarching goal of this class is to empower students with the technical knowledge to express themselves through ceramics coherently using a comprehensive understanding of surface through formulation and testing.

Some basic tools will be required.

Print and Process (PHO4246.01)

The focus of this course is preparing digital files for large inkjet printing. Starting with capture, students will learn how to make images with the intention of printing them larger than 20 inches. Students may work with analog negatives or digital RAW files and will learn how to properly scan and import. Students will learn how to appropriately organize and catalog their files with Adobe Bridge, as well as Photoshop techniques for dust spotting, color correction, and sharpening. Students will then learn the steps needed to make test prints on a smaller scale and finally how to print on the Epson 9890 44inch printer. Careful attention will be paid to paper choice and students will be expected to purchase their own paper for their final projects. We will cover options for handling, storing, and displaying large prints. Throughout this course students will be working to refine their eye for color, to make carefully considered editing and printing choices, and to hold themselves and their work to a higher standard.

Film Scoring (MCO4101.01)

The practice of underscoring movies is as old as film itself, from early improvised accompaniments to silent films, to the orchestrations of Ennio Morricone and Louis and Bebe Barron. In this course, we will look and listen to a variety of films and sound scores throughout the ages, analyzing the way in which they act as counterpoint to content and the visual score. Written analysis of diverse film sound design, foley, and musical accompaniments will serve as background to the studentsʹ own projects. Students will be expected to provide musical content to a variety of films by the end of the term (which may include collaborations with other student projects in video and animation) as well as orchestration of previously existing films. Students will be expected to record and sync their music within a digital environment. This course is a co-requisite with Sound Design for Moving Images.

Corequisites: Students must also register for Sound Design for Moving Images (MSR4120.01)

Sound Design for Moving Images (MSR4120.01)

This class is an introduction to the creative approaches and applications of sound design and audio production for moving images. In this course, we will explore the techniques used in the audio post-production for moving images and focus on the role of the sound designer. We will focus on designing sounds using Foley, sound effects editing, and post-processing. Students will learn how to edit dialogue, sound effects, and music. Seminar style lectures will also be included where concepts and artistic approaches are discussed. This course is a co-requisite with Film Scoring.

Corequisites: Students must also register for Film Scoring (MCO4101.01)

Silkscreen Printmaking (PRI2122.02)

Screen printing is an extremely versatile means of reproducing a 2-D image onto a variety of objects. Hand-drawn, painted, photographic and digital images can be used singularly and in combination with each other. Preparation and processing is relatively simple and multiples can be produced quickly. In this class, we will print with non-toxic, water based inks.

We will begin by covering the basics: how to stretch a screen, coat it with photo-sensitive emulsion, expose and re-expose a variety of artwork. From there, we will delve into ink modification and color mixing, printing a single color, blending colors in split-fountain printing and clean-up.

After mastering these fundamental methods, students will learn registration techniques for printing multiple colors/layers and best practices for overprinting on paper. Additional areas of exploration may include printing on fabric and the use of repeated patterns, printing on other substrates and monotype printing (producing unique images).

The Body Acoustic: Toward a Sense of Place (DAN2112.01)

How do we physically understand the spaces we are in?  How is each of us affected by them?  How do we develop a deeper sense of place? The Body Acoustic aims to heighten awareness of the reciprocal relationship between the built environment and our senses. Light and sound, distances, height, volume, surfaces, angles/curves and a/symmetries all affect one’s movement through interior and exterior spaces; one’s movement, in turn, affects the perception of these spaces.

Using methodologies from visual and movement-based art forms, The Body Acoustic provides an opportunity for students of any discipline to engage in trans-disciplinary research and practice. Throughout the course, students will graphically articulate their experiences inhabiting multiple spaces (i.e. drawing, photo collage), design and make simple situations/spaces to move through and will determine short scenes/movement studies to influence our sense of place. Students will form teams to complete short on-site exercises and will share results of other assigned exercises through discussion and presentation.  Criteria for evaluation include participation in all class sessions and discussions, satisfactory completion of all assignments and active participation in all reviews of student work.

Technical Topics: Moving Image Equipment (FV2128.02)

This seven-week course is an opportunity to gain hands-on experience with the entire video and animation equipment inventory. In class we will use a wide variety of cameras, set up audio and lighting equipment, learn about camera stabilization, capture drone footage, and experiment with projectors. Throughout the course students will be asked to give live demonstrations and apply what they have learned to their discipline.

Piano (MIN4333.01, section 1)

Individual private lessons for advanced students. Audition required. Weekly meetings times on scheduled class days arranged with the instructor. Participation in music workshop and end-of-term recital required.

Corequisites: Must participate in Music Workshop (Tuesday, 6:30 – 8pm)

Piano (MIN4333.03, section 3)

Individual private lessons for advanced students. Audition required. Weekly meetings times on scheduled class days arranged with the instructor. Participation in music workshop and end-of-term recital required.

Corequisites: Must participate in Music Workshop (Tuesday, 6:30 – 8pm)

Piano (MIN4333.02, section 2)

Individual private lessons for advanced students. Audition required. Weekly meetings times on scheduled class days arranged with the instructor. Participation in music workshop and end-of-term recital required.

Corequisites: Must participate in Music Workshop (Tuesday, 6:30 – 8pm)

Piano Lab II (MIN4236.02, section 2)

The goals of this course are to gain ease and dexterity at the keyboard, developing a confident piano technique and the skill of reading musical notation. Students will expand upon the skills learned in Piano lab I, adding to a basic repertoire of scales and chords, use them in improvisation and harmonization of melodies. In addition they will explore a repertoire that utilizes the musical components covered and learn to perform selected compositions.

Piano Lab II (cancelled)

The goals of this course are to gain ease and dexterity at the keyboard, developing a confident piano technique and the skill of reading musical notation. Students will expand upon the skills learned in Piano lab I, adding to a basic repertoire of scales and chords, use them in improvisation and harmonization of melodies. In addition they will explore a repertoire that utilizes the musical components covered and learn to perform selected compositions.

Piano Lab I (MIN2232.01, section 1)

Introductory course in basic keyboard skills. Topics include reading notation, rhythm, technique, and general musicianship.

Piano Lab I (MIN2232.02, section 2)

Introductory course in basic keyboard skills. Topics include reading notation, rhythm, technique, and general musicianship.

Female Architect / Fictive Archive (VA4130.01)

A readings course centered on the Usdan Gallery survey of fictional twentieth-century Czech architect Petra Andrejova-Molnár, created by artist Katarina Burin as a feminist meditation on the absence and erasure of women designers within the modernist canon. Exhibition components such as biographical texts, staged photographs, drawings, furniture, décor, and models provide the setting for texts on themes including gender, authorship, the fictive archive, and the mythos of “the architect.”

The 2020 Election (APA2174.01)

This course looks at the Presidential candidates for 2020, their platforms, and how these platforms would impact American society. Additionally, the course will work to examine and conclude what issues are most important to Americans and how Americans view politics and the American Presidency at this time in the country’s history. In addition to required readings and writing assignments, student will be responsible for conducting significant research largely through the interview process.

Improvisation: Somatic Nuance (DAN2143.01)

This is a class for those curious about their bodies’ potential for spontaneous, nuanced movement. We will begin with a slow warmup, emphasizing our natural desire to move. We will use varied improvisational structures or scores to create frames for attention. By gaining awareness in our bodies, we will improve our ability to move easily and articulately. We will explore dancing in small groups, alone and through partnership. We will aim for an expansive, expressive and joyful experience of moving.

Intermediate Voice (MVO4301.04, section 4)

For students of varying levels of singing ability. Vocal production and physiology will be discussed. Group warm-ups and vocalizations will incorporate exercises to develop breath control, resonance, projection, range, color, and agility. The fundamental concepts of singing will be explored in the preparation of specific song assignments. Personalization of text and emotional expression will be addressed. Students will study and perform traditional classical song literature (including early Italian songs, 17-18th century arias and repertoire in several languages) to strengthen and to facilitate technical growth before moving on to other contemporary styles. Students will have half-hour repertory sessions every other week with an accompanist. Students must have previous voice experience and/or study, and some music literacy.

Corequisites: Attendance and participation in Music Workshop (T 6:30pm – 8:00pm)

Intermediate Voice (MVO4301.03, section 3)

For students of varying levels of singing ability. Vocal production and physiology will be discussed. Group warm-ups and vocalizations will incorporate exercises to develop breath control, resonance, projection, range, color, and agility. The fundamental concepts of singing will be explored in the preparation of specific song assignments. Personalization of text and emotional expression will be addressed. Students will study and perform traditional classical song literature (including early Italian songs, 17-18th century arias and repertoire in several languages) to strengthen and to facilitate technical growth before moving on to other contemporary styles. Students will have half-hour repertory sessions every other week with an accompanist. Students must have previous voice experience and/or study, and some music literacy.

Corequisites: Attendance and participation in Music Workshop (T 6:30-8:00)

Intermediate Voice (MVO4301.02, section 2)

For students of varying levels of singing ability. Vocal production and physiology will be discussed. Group warm-ups and vocalizations will incorporate exercises to develop breath control, resonance, projection, range, color, and agility. The fundamental concepts of singing will be explored in the preparation of specific song assignments. Personalization of text and emotional expression will be addressed. Students will study and perform traditional classical song literature (including early Italian songs, 17-18th century arias and repertoire in several languages) to strengthen and to facilitate technical growth before moving on to other contemporary styles. Students will have half-hour repertory sessions every other week with an accompanist. Students must have previous voice experience and/or study, and some music literacy.

Corequisites: Attendance and participation in Music Workshop (T 6:30-8:00)

Intermediate Voice (MVO4301.01, section 1)

For students of varying levels of singing ability. Vocal production and physiology will be discussed. Group warm-ups and vocalizations will incorporate exercises to develop breath control, resonance, projection, range, color, and agility. The fundamental concepts of singing will be explored in the preparation of specific song assignments. Personalization of text and emotional expression will be addressed. Students will study and perform traditional classical song literature (including early Italian songs, 17-18th century arias and repertoire in several languages) to strengthen and to facilitate technical growth before moving on to other contemporary styles. Students will have half-hour repertory sessions every other week with an accompanist. Students must have previous voice experience and/or study, and some music literacy.

Corequisites: Attendance and participation in Music Workshop (T 6:30pm – 8:00pm)

Live Sound Technology (MSR2124.01)

This will be a hands-on, bare-bones, system-focused class on audio electronics. We will explore the smallest inputs to the largest outputs that are used in artistic performance. The class will focus on the technical applications of microphones, mixers, speakers and software for live productions such as plays, concerts, Dance performances and installations. Students will use what they have learned by setting up and running sound for Music Workshop and other performances on campus.

Corequisites: Attendance at Music Workshop (T 6:30-8:00)

Intro to Max (MCO2116.01)

This course will look at the versatile program of Max/MSP/Jitter, a high-level programming platform for sound and visuals. Our focus will be on the sonic capabilities of the program, though we will dip occasional into visuals, video, and sensing technologies. Students will develop independent research, and projects based on their interests and abilities, and must have an independent streak for troubleshooting and communal problem solving. Smaller exercises will show how to reproduce analogue problems in the digital realm, and bring us towards a sonic understanding of both. Visiting specialists will show how to bring Max into diverse interactions with other disciplines and new sensing technologies, from motion sensors, image tracking, and integration with Arduino.

Intermediate Violin/ Viola (MIN4232.01)

Basic techniques will include the reading music in treble and /or alto cleft in basic keys. Hand position including left-hand sifting and fingering will be shown, and a rudimentary facility with the bow will be developed in order for students to participate in simple ensemble performances by the end of the term.

Corequisites: must participate and perform at least twice in Music Workshop (Tu. 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm)

Beginning Violin/Viola (MIN2241.01)

Basic techniques will include the reading of music in either treble/or alto clefs in the easy keys. Basic hand positions and appropriate fingerings will be shown, and a rudimentary facility with the bow will be developed in order that all students may participate in simple ensemble performance by the end of the term. The student must have a basic knowledge of reading music. Students will participate in a showcase at the end of the term.

The student must arrange for the use of a college instrument if needed (contact Music Coordinator)

Corequisites: Participation Music Workshop T 6:30-8:00

Jazz Ensemble (MPF4250.01, section 1)

This ensemble will perform a wide range of Jazz music (a genre that is constantly evolving), with an emphasis on both ensemble playing and improvisation skills. By playing together, students will learn how blues, swing, Latin, and rock elements have all fueled this music called jazz. Students will also learn how major Jazz artists such as Ellington, Monk, Mingus, Wayne Shorter, Ornette Coleman and others have approached composition. As a group we will explore different techniques for playing over chord changes and ways to make improvised solos more interesting, both harmonically and rhythmically. Whether playing a jazz standard, a student composition, or free music, the emphasis will be on listening and on interacting with each other, finding ways to create blend, groove, dynamic contrast, and tension/release. Students will also be encouraged to bring in arrangements, transcriptions, and compositions, which will be read and developed by the ensemble. Students need to have adequate technique on a musical instrument, be able to read music and have a basic understanding of harmony (chord structures, chord-scales, etc.)

Jazz Piano (MIN4240.01)

Weekly private instruction in jazz piano to be arranged with instructor. Explore and develop skills and knowledge required to effectively play non-classical piano repertoire. Styles covered: blues, reggae, salsa, bossa-nova and jazz. Create bass lines, chord voicings, stylistic rhythms, melodies and improvised solos.

Violin/Viola (MIN4345.01)

Studies in all left-hand position and shifting and an exploration of various bow techniques. Students can select from the concerto, sonata repertoire, short pieces and etudes for the study designed to develop technique, advanced musicianship and prepare for the performance.

Corequisites: Must participate and perform at least twice in Music Workshop (Tu. 6:30pm – 8:00pm)

Queer Feminist Sculpture: The Space Between Us (APA4158.02)

In this seven-week seminar and studio, students will produce creative, self-directed projects across media (video, sound, sculpture, etc.) that deal with the space between us, or proxemics, the study of personal and interpersonal spatial politics. The seminar will center artists Jeff Kasper and Chloe Bass, in particular Kasper’s wrestling embrace, a customizable workshop co-designed by/with/for queer folks and Bass’ The Book of Everyday Instruction, an eight-chapter investigation into one-on-one social interaction, including a workbook, measuring ribbons, and writing tools for examining how we tell a story based on the proximity of two bodies in space. Students will learn about the work of Lygia Clark, Roni Horn, Franz Erhard Walther, Ana Mendieta, Erwin Wurm, Catalina Ouyang, and will create self-directed projects in critical and imaginative response to the field of proxemics. It is helpful to have taken at least one 2000 level course in sculpture, sound, or video prior to enrolling in this course. The archive for this course is drawn from The Study Center for Group Work: http://studycollaboration.com/practice/field-guide-spatial-intimacy

For registration please complete this form

Model Shop: Studies in Scale (VA4119.01)

This course is about the architectural model as a physical representation of structure. Students will work with a variety of materials, and at multiple scales to learn about both the practical uses of scale-models as well as the generative potential of scalar manipulation, and the miniature. Coursework will emphasize the importance of an organized digital and physical work-space, and students will learn methods of laying out and building physical models as studies, mock-ups or finished objects. We will study and discuss scale models made by architects, set designers, toy-makers, animators, and artists. At the end of the course, each student will present a scale model complete with scale figures.

Movement Practice: Beginning-Intermediate Dance Technique (DAN2119.01)

In this basic intermediate course, we will work with imagery to help explore potential in the body. We will practice kinesthetic exercises that will help expand movement range, strength, and specificity. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the feeling of movement, deeply, and trusting it. From this we can understand how this feeling moves the body, and eventually how this body moves the space and bodies around it.

There are different kinds of effort involved in moving. We will look at these specifics in order to understand our affinities for particular movement. Once understood, it may open up a wide vocabulary. We will work on duration and endurance, so that they are not a hindrance. From there we can redetermine our capacities.

Movement Practice: Advanced Dance Technique (DAN4344.01)

In this advanced level course, we will focus on tapping into the subtle connections in the body. We will be using improvisational scores and somatic exercises to hone these connections and increase self-awareness. Gentle focus can be used to achieve high intensity movement. Tracking what we are doing as we do it–we will acknowledge the nervous system’s role in our movement efforts. It is important that we are able to do this with a non-judgmental mindset. We will learn to watch openly, gathering information from others, to increase possibilities in performance.

Performance Project : Ephemeral Archive (DAN4138.01)

We will collectively generate a new work; each person will play an integral role in the development of the project.  We will amass a large kind of historical archive from which we choose how to stage the work.  Using the voice and text,  we will push into rigorous physicality, exploring range and nuance. We will perform this in a concert at the end of the term.

Orchestration (MUS4013.01)

A primer in orchestration, for students who are selected to write for Sage City Symphony for their Spring concert. We will pore over the 19th and 20th century orchestral repertoire, getting to know instruments, ranges, and agilities. Analysis, piano reduction, and orchestration from grand staff will be used to internalize and hear orchestration. Students will be expected to create and get feedback on textural sketches of their future pieces.

Student to Student: A College Access Mentoring Program at Mount Anthony Union High School (APA4132.01)

In this course, college student mentors will work with high school student mentees to develop college aspirations and contribute to mentees’ knowledge about the college application process. Each week college students will travel to Mount Anthony Union High School to meet with their college student mentees for an hour. We will then return to Bennington College campus for the remaining class time during which we will discuss literature about mentoring and college access, as well as the plan for meeting with the high school students next week. Mentors will share their college access stories with their mentees and invite their mentees to discuss their own educational aspirations in shared storytelling sessions. Possible topics we will cover with the high school student mentees include the college application process, including searching for colleges and writing a personal statement, as well as the process of applying for financial aid. In this course, Bennington College students will have the opportunity to put a personal face on the often mystifying college application process and will develop mentoring and leadership skills as they do so.

Traditional Music of North America (MHI2135.01)

This course explores music from early native music through contemporary singer-songwriters. Some of the traditions we draw from include African, Native American, Quebecois, Appalachian, Irish and Scottish, British Isle traditions, Cajun, Blues, Gospel, and Conjunto music. Instrumental, dance, and ballad traditions are explored. Students must bring a guitar, banjo, mandolin, or fiddle (or other social instrument) to class for purposes of furthering personal music making through traditional forms. We will practice and perform as a group, improving our reading and aural skills. Other instruments are possible, but the students must discuss this with the instructor.

Aluminum and Stainless Steel Fabrication (SCU4103.02)

In this course we will focus on cutting and welding non-ferrous metals. CNC assisted plasma cutting will pair with the more traditional methods of shaping the material The fabrication processes will begin through brazing methods (acetylene and oxygen) for connecting non-similar metals then we will advance to learning the skills involved in using the GTAW welders for non-ferrous welding. This is a project based foundation course on a more advanced level. The student must have practiced and comfortably understand the processes in basic gas and electric welding.

Metal casting: Iron and Aluminum (SCU2211.01)

This course is designed to introduce students to the processes involved in casting Iron and Aluminum. Students will work with foundry wax and learn how to produce a sculpted object either by hand or that of some other method covered in class. These additional methods could include machining parts, 3d printing objects or casting from the body. After a form has been produced the student will create molds that will be used for casting in both Iron and Aluminum. The first couple of weeks will be focused on producing molds that will be included in an intercollegiate iron pour in Salem New York. Participating among other Colleges allow for large scale participation experience to the world of artists casting in metal. This first pour at Salem shows rigid scheduling and teaches safety practices that we will then bring back to Bennington to prepare for our own Aluminum pour here at the College.

Processes used include but not limited to: Developing sand part molds with Silbond, casting wax with alginate and plaster , lost wax methods, and proper safety measures are taught through out each step.

What is Economics? (SCT2136.01)

“Economics is what economists do” says Jacob Viner. But what do economists do? And, how do they do it? This seminar will be concerned with these two questions. Our main objective will be develop an understanding of economics as a field of study and to explore how economics is applied to understand everyday issues that affect our material wellbeing. We will look at big issues, such as recession, unemployment, poverty and environmental degradations, as well as smaller issues, such as how to avoid paying too much money in a retail store, how rents of your apartment are determined, why online commercial websites can survive competition, and how automobile manufacturing companies can function profitably. In examining these large and small issue, we will explore how economists view the world and how economics has evolved as an intellectual discipline.

This is an introductory course and it has no prerequisites.

Economy and Ecology (PEC2253.01)

Simply put, economics deals with the material world, and ecology is concerned with the living world. How do the two worlds meet and interact? This seminar explores this intriguing question. This broad question can be analyzed in terms of more pointed queries: What are the feedbacks between the economic and the ecological systems? How do markets and incentives affect people’s behavior and decisions regarding nature? How do people’s behavior affect the changes in hydrological, nutrient or carbon cycles? How do the changes in climate and hydrological cycles bring about changes in economic production and consumption? What does environmental sustainability entail? Can egalitarian values like fairness and justice, and care values such as concern for living organisms and future- mindedness form the basis for the preservation and quality of human and nonhuman life? We will seek the answers to these questions in terms of analytical models drawn from the field of Ecological Economics, and in terms of case studies and illustrative examples drawn from real life practices of people.

This is an introductory course and it has no prerequisites.

Economic Development (PEC4105.01)

Much of economics is concerned with problems of development, as the essential object of the entire economic exercise is improvement in people’s material conditions of living and their quality of life. In this seminar we will examine the evolution in economic thinking about development—its nature, its causes, and the choice of strategies for facilitating the process of economic development through surplus generation, resource allocation, and economic distribution. And, we will explore some of the unsettled questions and key issues in development economics that remain to be resolved.

The seminar is designed for advanced students. The prerequisites for this course include at least two 2000-level courses in SCT. Preference will be given to students with prior knowledge in economics.

Prioritization of registration: Students should email the course instructor with an expression of interest, and explain in few sentences: a) why they are interested in this course; b) if the course fits with their academic plan, and, if so, how; c) if they fulfill the prerequisites for the course and what courses (that would satisfy the prerequisite criteria) have they taken before, stating the course name and level of prior courses in economics/political economy, SCT, mathematics, etc. The emails should be received by April 30th.

Education, Inc. (SOC4104.02)

In this course, we will examine the rise of market-based approaches to K-12 education reform in America. What are the theoretical arguments for implementing free market reforms in public schooling? What are examples of school choice policies and what are the consequences of these for students and families? How has the increased privatization and marketing of schools influenced the larger educational landscape? To what extent do free-market reforms contribute to racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic segregation in schools? We will examine current research addressing all of these questions, including the role that politics plays in producing school choice scholarship. Students will learn to apply a variety of theoretical frameworks used to examine school choice policies, including Milton Friedman’s free-market capitalism, Albert O. Hirschman’s concepts of exit, voice, and loyalty, and organizational ecology.

Working With Light (DRA2234.01)

Lighting design has the powerful ability to shape the experience of an audience. Its practice incorporates elements of artistry and craft, and should interest those working in all aspects of visual and performing arts. In addition to hands-on work with theatrical lighting equipment in and outside of class, awareness of light, play analysis and conceptualization, color, angle, composition and focus are explored in class demonstrations and in a series of individual and group projects. Some reading (including two plays) and short writing assignments are also included, as is an introduction to lighting design documentation.

This course will be offered the first seven weeks of the semester.

The Physics of Light and Color (PHY2114.01)

The physics of light and color initially appears simple: light is a wave and the wavelength of light determines color. While this basic physical description of light is easy to state, going deeper quickly opens up large range of questions. How do different wavelengths of light combine to make colors? How does light from different sources interfere? How does light change path when it travels through different materials? How do humans sense light both in and outside of the visible spectrum? How does our perception of color affect how we interpret our world? Each question reveals a deeper level of detail and more complexity. While the fundamentals of this course will address the underlying physics of light and color, student interest will drive experimental projects in a variety of areas that extend the ideas of the course.

Students with an artistic interest in light and/or color who are interested in developing a deeper understanding of the physics that underlies our visual perception should find this class particularly interesting.

Hugh Crowl
T 8:30-12:10 (first seven weeks)
This course is categorized as All courses, Physics.

The Physics of Sound (PHY2278.02)

Physically, sound is simply the compression of air around us. However, this relatively simply description obscures a much richer understanding of sound. From how different sounds are generated and perceived to how different sounds can combine to make something new to how to design acoustically pleasant spaces, the physics of sound plays a key role. This course is about the fundamentals that underlie sound and is designed to serve as an introduction to those who are interested in going further. We will discuss wave theory, sound propagation, constructive and destructive interference, beats, and resonance, among other ideas. This course will be mixed between a lecture/discussion and a hands-on lab and students will be expected to design their own final project extending the ideas of the course.

Hugh Crowl
T 8:30-12:10 (second seven weeks)
This course is categorized as All courses, Physics.

History of Animation (MA2137.01)

A brief history of animated images from the 1500s to the present day. The class will be split into watching documentaries and animations along with discussions. A quiz and short responses will be required.

Adobe Creative Suite for Artists (DA2102.01)

This course introduces artists to Adobe Creative Suite via Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign. Together we will explore the individual capabilities of each program and how to bridge between them. We will also learn best practices in creating and managing digital files.

Students will apply skills learned to their own creative projects and ideas. They will also have the opportunity to work with the laser cutter and large format printers, translating their digital ideas into physical objects.

Traditional Music Ensemble (MPF4221.01)

We will study and perform from the string band traditions of rural America. Nova Scotia, Quebecois, Irish, New England, Scandinavian, African American dance and ballad traditions will also be experienced with listening, practice (weekly group rehearsals outside of class), and performing components. Emphasis on ensemble intuition, playing by ear, and lifetime personal music making skills (transposition, harmonizing, etc.). Previous playing experience required on one or more of the following instruments: violin, guitar, banjo, mandolin, bass accordion, concertina, penny whistle, flute, bodhran, harp, ukulele, or piano. Students must have three to five years of instrument playing experience, and must have their own instrument or arrange for instrument use per term.

Fiddle (MIN2227.01)

For the experienced (2+years of playing) violinist. Lessons in traditional styles of fiddling – Quebecois, New England, Southern Appalachian, Cajun, Irish, and Scottish. This tutorial is designed to heighten awareness of the variety of ways the violin is played regionally and socially in North America (and indeed around the world these days) and to give practical music skills for furthering personal music making. Students will be expected to perform at Music Workshop, or as part of a concert, in ensemble and/or solo.

Mandolin (MIN2229.01)

Beginning, intermediate and advanced group or individual lessons on the mandolin will be offered. Students will learn classical technique on the mandolin and start to develop a repertoire of classical and traditional folk pieces. Simple song sheets with chords, tablature, and standard notation, chord theory, and scale work will all be used to further skills. Students will be expected to perform at Music Workshop, or as part of a concert, in ensemble and/or solo. Depending on scheduling, these will be individual or group lessons. Students must have their own instrument.

Corequisite: Must participate in Music Workshop (Tuesday, 6:30 – 8:00 pm).

Banjo (MIN2215.01)

Beginning, intermediate, or advanced group lessons on the 5-string banjo in the claw-hammer/frailing style. Student will learn to play using simple song sheets with chords, tablature, and standard notation. Using chord theory and scale work, personal music-making skills will be enhanced. Awareness of traditional styles of playing the instrument will be furthered through a listening component and ensemble playing with other instrumentalists.

Living in Translation: A Student-Run Literary and Cultural Publication (LIT2347.02)

This course, while rooted in Literature, is part of the Lexicons of Migration cluster. Taking as a point of departure Isabelle de Courtivron’s touchstone Bilingual Lives: Writers and Identity, students will update, complicate, and enrich the binary orientation of this collection, originally published in 2003. We will delve into the personal, familial, communal, and political dynamics of living diasporic, multi-lingual and multi-cultural lives. Our readings will include Madhu Kaza’s Kitchen Table Translation, Mireille Gansel’s Translation as Transhumance, and ark Polizzotti’s Sympathy for the Traitor: A Translation Manifesto; and a wide array of poems, stories, and hybrid texts from around the world.

Students will conceive, commission, edit, and design this online publication, which may culminate in a one-off print volume. There is the potential for editorial cooperation with students from Bard, Sarah Lawrence and Vassar; editorial calls for student submissions may be national and international.

We will host distinguished guest writer-translators; attendance at these events is mandatory.

Students from all disciplines are welcome.

InTranslation: Lives, Texts, Testimony (LIT2279.01)

What does it mean to be “rooted,” “uprooted,” “living in translation”? Can a language, literary tradition, or far-flung literary republic be one’s homeland? Does “cultural authority” derive from being considered “native”? How is it that immigrant literary translators have been met with apprehension on the part of publishers? Might this stem from definitions of “fluency” and “expertise” that are themselves full of anxiety, confusion, political vexation, and even bias? What about the age-old debate between “domesticating” texts from elsewhere and making the reader aware of the palpable signs of “foreign-ness” in the original? Should a language have a legitimized “standard” usage? These, and other questions, will fuel our discussions.

Course-Connected Visiting Translator Series: “Immigration and Diaspora” Attendance at Guest Readings is mandatory.

This class is part of the Lexicons of Migration Consortium with Bard, Sarah Lawrence and Vassar. There will be opportunities for exchange with the students and faculty from these partner institutions

Performance Project: The Dynamic Group (DAN4137.01)

How are groups identified, formed, reformed, sustained, absorbed, or disbanded? What is an individual’s responsibility towards the group? How is individuality acknowledged within the group? How do individuals handle becoming inseparable from the group?

In this project, we will investigate these questions though movement and discussion. We will work in groups, shifting participants, and place those groups in relationship to other groups, objects, costumes, spaces, lighting conditions, etc. Something that looks like one group from the outside may actually be a collection of three groups internally. We are looking for unpredictable dynamics, patterns, and ultimately surprise.

This class will culminate in some form of performance at the end of the term. As such, this class will periodically require additional meetings outside of scheduled class time.

Cello (MIN4355.01)

Studio instruction in cello. There will be an emphasis on creating and working towards an end-of-term project for each student. Students must have had at least three years of cello study.

Corequisites: Music Workshop attendance 7 times per term.

Beginning Cello (MIN2354.01)

The basics of cello. In a small group, students will learn how to play the cello, with an emphasis on a group performance at the term’s conclusion.

Corequisites: Must attend and participate in Music Workshop (Tuesday, 6:30 – 8pm).

Science Fiction as Agent of Change (FV4223.01)

This is a seminar, screening and production half-semester course, based on themes within Science Fiction and Speculative Fiction as means to imagine a different future.  In the first half we will be viewing films, from big budget to experimental and performance-based video art, while also listening to music, audio plays, and reading experimental and theoretical texts to support weekly thematic discussions. We will contrast Hollywood narratives against historical films like Born in Flames, Space is the Place, Fresh Kill, and Flaming Creatures, alongside the work of many contemporary artists.  Further, we will be reading texts by Gayatri Spivak, José Esteban Muñoz, Laboria Cuboniks, and Fred Moten, among others – texts conceptualizing the urgency in reimagining the future to make room for identities in alterity in the present.  In the second half of the course students will work towards a short self-formed project in either film/video, script, or critical/experimental text.  Entry into the class is predicated on the professor’s permission, and those interested must submit a sample of recent work in either moving image or text.

Advanced Voice (MVO4401.01, section 1)

Advanced study of vocal technique and the interpretation of the vocal repertoire, designed for advanced students who have music as a plan concentration and to assist graduating seniors with preparation for senior recitals. Students are required to study and to perform a varied spectrum of vocal repertory for performance and as preparation for further study or graduate school. A class maximum of five voice students will meet for one-hour individual or semi-private session/coachings with the instructor each week (to be scheduled with the instructor). Students will also have an individual half-hour session with a pianist each week to work on repertory.

Corequisites: Attendance and participation in Music Workshop (Tuesday, 6:30 – 8pm).

Bass Intensive (MIN4026.01)

Advanced studies in theory relating to performance.

Corequisites: Students must be enrolled in Bass with Bisio (MIN4417) simultaneously, no exceptions. This class is only for advanced students and by permission of instructor.

Mallet Percussion Ensemble (MPF4106.01)

Mallet Percussion Ensemble explores a variety of musical techniques while creating compositions for the mallet keyboard instrument. Works for mallet percussion are learned or arranged from composers such as Bach, Fernando Sor, Gordon Stout, Franz Schubert, Jobim, Miles, and popular songs. No prior experience for playing mallet keyboards is required, but reading music and pattern recognition is a plus. Rehearsing individually and attending lab as a group is highly recommended. Presenting solo and ensemble works-in-progress for music workshop and campus events are encouraged.

Corequisites: Piano, Composition.

Drumming: An Extension of Language (MIN2120.01)

This course serves as an introduction to rhythms, chants, and musical practices from Africa, Brazil, Cuba, Haiti, and the African Diaspora. Using indigenous percussion instruments from these territories, students will use their hands, mallets, and sticks to play traditional folkloric rhythms and melodies. Additional topics will cover history, culture, language, and dance. This class serves the greater Bennington community in the fall by partnering with the South Western Vermont Medical Center. Near the end of term students will share their work with residents in SVMC. A weekly practice lab is expected.

Exploring the Work and Legacy of Jerzy Grotowski (DRA2219.01)

“No one else in the world, to my knowledge, no one since Stanislavski, has investigated the nature of acting, its phenomenon, its meaning, the nature and science of its mental, physical, emotional process as deeply and completely as Grotowski”-Peter Brook

Jerzy Grotowski is considered one of the most influential theater practitioners of the 20th century. In this course we will explore the many phases of his research over forty years of unique and rigorous theatrical investigation. We will begin with the Theater of Performance and continue on through his Paratheatrical phase, Theater of Sources, Objective Drama and Art as a Vehicle. We will also investigate the work of several of the countless theater artists whose work he inspired. We will read Towards a Poor Theatre. Assignments will include a mid-term paper and a final paper/project.

Graduate Assistantship in Public Action (APA5101.02, section 2)

Graduate students in Public Action are integrated into the CAPA and related discipline areas as teaching assistants. In consultation with the faculty, MFA candidates develop an assistantship schedule of approximately 5 hours weekly.

Graduate Assistantship in Public Action (APA5101.01, section 1)

Graduate students in Public Action are integrated into the CAPA and related discipline areas as teaching assistants. In consultation with the faculty, MFA candidates develop an assistantship schedule of approximately 5 hours weekly.

How to Collaborate: Threeing (APA2214.03)

If group work is both the most necessary and the most difficult endeavor of our time, what methods are necessary for collaboration in the visual arts? In this seminar and studio, students will focus on a method for group work that was developed by the video-artist (not politician) Paul Ryan between 1971 and the end of his life, in 2013. Threeing is “a voluntary practice in which three people take turns playing three different roles: initiator, respondent, and mediator.” Working in groups of three, students will use Threeing to create ephemeral installations, drawings, texts, and conversations while rotating between these three roles: initiator, respondent and mediator. This course takes as its archive The Study Center for Group Work, a library of collaborative methods that have been developed by artists: http://studycollaboration.com

Photography Remade (PHO2155.01)

This 2-credit course invites students to remake existing images, and explores digital techniques for adding, removing, combining, rearranging, and distorting content. Students are welcome to shoot their own photographs, however this is not required, and it is not necessary to have a camera. Instead, the emphasis will be on how to work creatively with image selection, manipulation, and display. The primary technical goal of the course will be to develop students’ skills in Photoshop, focusing on advanced, non-destructive techniques including a range of tools for selections and masking, multiple adjustment layers, and blending modes. Students will learn to make bold modifications, clean-edged collages, and seamless composites, while deepening their understanding of related historical and contemporary work. Readings, discussions, and slideshows will examine themes of redaction, negation, and erasure, as well as collecting, copying, collaging, and the complex relationship between photography and truth. We will also look at image manipulation in mobile apps and discuss how our relationship with photography is influenced by new technologies like augmented reality. Class time will include technical demonstrations and supervised practice in the digital photo lab, as well as group critiques and discussions. Students will be responsible for completing creative and technical assignments, readings, and a self-directed final project.

Movement Practice: Intermediate-Advanced Dance Technique (DAN4148.01)

This intermediate-advanced level movement practice is designed for students with prior experience in dance technique. In this class, we will hone in on the importance of balancing controlled and spontaneous action as well as internal and external movement through using a series of improvisational and compositional practices. We will be learning longer and complex movement phrases that are structured with principles from Water Body Movement (“Body is a container filled with water. Movements are a flow of the water.”) Bringing conscious thought and heightened awareness to both interior and exterior spaces, we deepen our understanding about the unity of our body/mind and how it functions as a whole. We aim to maximize each student’s performance skills and cultivate personal ways to understand how to use one’s own body.

Movement Practice: Beginning Dance Technique (DAN2121.01)

This beginning dance course requires no previous dance training.

Students are introduced to some basic principles of dancing by learning various movement patterns. The class also introduces the use of breath and somatic practices, which reflect some principles of Zen and Japanese somatic practices such as butoh and Water Body Movement (or Noguchi Taiso).  Attention will be given to cultivating and sharpening each student’s awareness of time, space and energy, in order to understand and maximize the individual’s unique physical impulses and expressions.  At the same time, we will be disciplining the body to move rhythmically and precisely with clear intentions and awareness.

Artist’s Portfolio (DAN4366.01)

Explaining artwork often goes against the grain, yet artists are regularly called upon to articulate their processes, tools, and dynamics of collaboration. To help secure any of the myriad forms of institutional support including funding, venues, and engagements, artists must develop–creatively and flexibly–essential skills. Finding a public language for what is the private process of creation is an art in itself. Furthermore, understanding and discovering ways to adapt to changing economic realities is a critical component of making work; bringing the work into the world is a natural part of the artist’s process.

This course addresses basic issues involved in generating, developing, producing, and presenting artwork. Students will write artist statements, press releases, biographical statements, resumes, CV’s, grants and cover letters; will prepare budgets; will organize promotional portfolios/videotapes; will interview each other; and will give short lecture demonstrations.

Advanced Projects in Dance (DAN4795.01)

This is an essential course for students involved in making work for performance this term. Attention is given to all of the elements involved in composition and production, including collaborative aspects. Students are expected to show their work throughout stages of development, complete their projects, and perform them to the public by the end of the term.

Corequisites: Dance Workshop (Th 6:30-7:50); Dance or Drama Lab Assignment

Experimental Sound Practices (MSR2123.01)

In this introductory course, students will expand their understanding of electroacoustic music by creating their own sonic narratives. The topics will include soundscape composition, 3D sound recording, surround sound (5.1), site-specific sound work, and electromagnetic field listening. There will be an emphasis on production and experiential learning through exercises and workshops. Along with readings and discussions, we will look at various examples from sound art and experimental music. This course is introductory; however, it is open for students who want to incorporate sound-based works in their interdisciplinary projects at any level.

Visual Arts Lecture Series Seminar (VA4218.01)

This discussion-animated, readings-based seminar provides art historical, cultural, and critical contexts for the Visual Arts Lecture Series (VALS). In addition to our ongoing interrogation of the public lecture as such, students present their own work (in any field) and analyze the technical and stylistic aspects of structuring an effective and engaging ‘talk.’ The course provides unique opportunities for interaction with visiting artists, curators, critics, and historians. Consistent participation and a formal presentation of work/research is required, as are visits to local and regional museums and archives. Please note: Students taking the seminar will not need to register for, and will not receive separate credit for VALS. However, attendance at all VALS lectures is a requirement of the course.

Incarceration in America (APA2108.01)

7 million Americans are under correctional supervision. The United States of America has the highest documented rate of incarceration in the world. Too many people are in prison, and in many cases the current system doesn’t work. It is inefficient, inhumane, and does not accomplish rehabilitation. It also costs too much – financially as well as in terms of human suffering – the current $80 billion spent each year does not include either other incalculable associated costs or the far greater future resulting social and financial consequences.

There are alternatives and they work better and cost less. We will explore and discuss such questions as higher education in prison, alternatives to incarceration, race and incarceration, drugs and incarceration, incarceration and the mentally ill, children of incarcerated parents, and probation and other alternatives to incarceration.

Students will write one essay and make one presentation.

Comparative Political Corruption (POL4102.01)

Political corruption is broadly understood to involve the exploitation of public office for private gain. It is a longstanding problem, and it persists more or less in every society, including old democracies and developing countries. This course explores the definitions, drivers, patterns, effects and control of political corruption from a global perspective. Key topics include: a survey of major social science and public policy debates on the meanings, indicators, and causes of corruption; corruption in historical perspective across different political cultures and systems; contemporary political scandals and their ramifications for human rights, democracy, development, conflict, and international security; and national and international strategies to counteract or prevent the corrupt practices of public officials.

History of Photography/20th Century (PHO2154.01)

This class explores the various ways photography was intertwined with the artistic, political, and scientific developments of the 20th century on a global level. Students will do weekly research connecting to online sites hosted by major institutions such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Victoria & Albert Museum, The Getty and others. Class discussions, identification tests, and reflection essays are included in addition to slide presentations of material.

Architectural Graphics (ARC2104.01)

An introduction to a broad range of drawing techniques, including observational drawing, diagrammatic sketching, and geometric constructions. We will also master the conventions of architectural drawing, from plans and sections to three-dimensional projections. Weekly workshops and drawing assignments are required.

Corequisites: Architecture 1 – Elements

*When you register for ARC 2101 Architecture I – Elements online, the Registrar’s Office will register you in this corequisite course on Wednesday, May 15*

 

Plastic Pollution and What Students Can Do About It (APA2176.01)

Plastic pollution is gaining international attention for the damage it is doing to human health, fish and wildlife, the climate, the ocean and communities. This class will explore the dimensions of the problem, the root causes of plastic pollution and the need for innovation. The class will be taught in the Center for the Advancement of Public Action and will have a major focus on public action. Students will develop community projects to reduce plastic pollution, write letters to the editor and be empowered to take action on this worldwide problem.