Chromophilia: Explorations in Color (VA4215.01)

Ann Pibal

Chromophilia, a term coined by contemporary artist David Batchelor, refers to intense passion and love for color. What is it about color that has the power to induce reverie, and conversely to manipulate, or disgust? How do we understand and respond to color from phenomenological, poetic, philosophical, and societal vantage points? How as artists can we become the master of our passionately-loved and yet ever-shifting chroma?

In this class, we look carefully at and discuss the work of many artists and the implications of color in their images. Wide-ranging readings from literature, philosophy, and cultural criticism, serve as a base for discussion and artistic response.

Visual work for the first weeks of class consists of color problems using cut paper; in subsequent weeks, students solve problems presented in class with painting, or any other color-abled media. Reading and written responses are assigned weekly. Class time is primarily used for discussion of texts, critique of visual work, and student presentations of research. Assignments are given throughout, however, it is the objective of this class to provide the skills necessary for the student to confidently pursue self-designed projects. A high degree of motivation is expected.

Prerequisites: At least two courses in painting and or drawing at Bennington and permission of Instructor.
Credits: 4
T 2:10-5:50
Maximum Enrollment: 15
Course Frequency: Every 2-3 years
This course is categorized as All courses, Painting.