Archives

Social Emergency Medicine to Prevent Gun Violence (APA2239.03)

Firearm-related victimization, injury and death are among the most urgent public health problems facing our country, but there exists no utilitarian set of solutions.  Firearm injuries create an expansive series of direct and indirect negative health outcomes that ripple throughout communities, and each episode of gun violence is the consequence of a complex interrelated series of biosocial, environmental, behavioral and physical risk factors.  By understanding gun violence as a preventable disease and applying public health prevention techniques to this epidemic, healthcare professionals and their communities may develop systems of care to optimize gun safety, reduce risk and minimize public harm at every opportunity.

This course introduces students to the most prevalent public health issues related to the causes of gun violence, and explores the many multi-level health strategies that may be developed to prevent and treat gun violence in American society. Students will also gain exposure and experience in program design by creating, operationalizing and evaluating the impact of a novel, narrative-based educational framework for community outreach that unifies community stakeholders with their health systems, healthcare providers and first responders. Readings will involve both real-world programmatic documents/evaluations as well as peer-reviewed journal articles.

This course will be taught by Emergency Medicine Physician, Dr. Christopher Barsotti from AFFIRM: American Foundation for Firearm Injury Reduction.

(May 2, 3)

Peacebuilding Two: Be the change you want to see in the World (APA2240.03)

This Module will be a chance for students to reflect on their identities, inner issues they are aware or not aware and the desire to be social change agents. Together we will explore key topics of non-violent communication, personal potentials for peacebuilding, community building skills and different methods to deal with our individual daily struggles to be more effective human beings.

(April 10, 14, 17, 21, 24, 28)

Peacebuilding (APA2212.03)

This Module will serve as an introduction to the work of Peacebuilding around the world, both in theory and practice. Vahidin Omanovic, Director of Center for Peacebuilding in Bosnia, will be joining us to reflect on his work and introduce us to key topics in peacebuilding, including: peacebuilding in a local community, obstacles for peace, identity, discrimination, methods of sustainable peacebuilding.

(April 10, 14, 17, 21, 24, 28)

Women and Human Mobility (APA2213.03)

Human mobility has been an inherent human condition throughout history. From earliest human history, women and men have migrated in search of a better life, to populate other places on the planet, or to escape and survive human-made or natural dangers. Today migration is a fact of life for an increasing number of people around the world: there are more than 244 million migrants in the world, and almost half are women. The overwhelming majority of people who move do so inside their own country. However, migration can often involve cross-border movements, from a developing to a developed country, or more commonly within the same region.

Today, human mobility as a multi-causal phenomenon implies that people are migrating for a variety of reasons, which may be economic, social, political or environmental. Individuals migrate from the places where they were living because of the violence generated by State and non-State actors, armed conflicts, inequality, poverty, a lack of protection of economic, social and cultural rights, political instability, corruption, insecurity, various forms of discrimination, natural disasters, and the impact of climate change. Also, it may imply situations where men and women are physically transported across border without their consent, as in the case of trafficking. The factors that draw the migrant population are predominantly the prospect of better security, improved employment or educational opportunities, better access to services, more favorable climatic conditions, and others.

Many States have regulated migration through policies, laws, judgments and practices that directly violate the human rights of migrants and their families. At the same time, States have developed standards and mechanisms at the international, regional, bilateral and unilateral levels to regulate the flow of persons between States. The many laws, rules and regulations, fora and institutions through which States control international migration, either unilaterally or bilaterally for the most part, have resulted in a lack of consistency in global, regional and national governance of international migration that poses a challenge for the universal and regional codes developed for the protection of human rights.

Mobility is different for men and women, both in terms of the reasons why they migrate as well as the impact wile in transit and upon arrival to the destination and beyond. In this course we will explore the international rules that apply in different mobility scenarios focusing particularly in the effect that it has on women.

Through the course the students will explore:

– What is human mobility?
– How does human mobility particularly affects women?
– What are the main human rights challenges that create?
– What are the main international instruments that safeguard women in a mobility context?
– What is the role of the international and regional organizations?

The course will provide a comprehensive understanding of the effect on human mobility on women; how women’s human rights are affected by States’ policies and practices; and what is their protection under international human rights law.

(April 9, 13, 16, 20, 23, 27)

International Human Rights Law (APA2221.03)

Human rights are universal legal guarantees that protect individuals and groups against actions that interfere with fundamental freedoms and human dignity. Under international human rights law, States have the responsibility to respect, protect and fulfill human rights for all. If these obligations are not met, international legal action can be taken. Based on the international legal standards adopted by the international community through the time, this course aims to provide the students with the basic concepts of international human rights law, its sources, and the general protection institutions that exist to protect these guarantees. Through the course the students will explore:

– What are human rights?
– What are the main international instruments that safeguard human rights?
– Where do human rights rules come from?
– Who makes these rules? And who monitors those?
– What is the role of the international and regional organizations?

The course will provide a comprehensive understanding of the International Human Rights Law and its importance.

(April 9, 13, 16, 20, 23, 27)

Infinity (MAT2109.03)

A large part of modern mathematics has to do with how we conceptualize and manage the idea of infinity. This occurs in different places: the infinity of the horizon line that appeared with the development of perspective drawing, the infinitely small and infinitely many quantities of calculus, the infinite depth of fractals. This class will survey some of these concepts and briefly talk about how they are formalized in mathematics. There will be a particular emphasis on Cantor’s set theory, which was developed in the late nineteenth century, and which provided new logical tools and a new language to talk about infinite quantities. No mathematical background or knowledge will be assumed.

(April 10, 14, 17, 21, 24, 28)