Archives

After-School Education Module (APA2238.01)

This course will examine the readings of John Dewey and Paolo Friere as well as scholarly articles on After-School Education. Each student will develop a proposal for an After- School Education Workshop for Molly Stark Elementary School with the possibility of implementing this workshop in their After-School program later in the semester.

(February 19, 26, March 4)

Social Emergency Medicine to Prevent Gun Violence (APA2239.03)

Firearm-related victimization, injury and death are among the most urgent public health problems facing our country, but there exists no utilitarian set of solutions.  Firearm injuries create an expansive series of direct and indirect negative health outcomes that ripple throughout communities, and each episode of gun violence is the consequence of a complex interrelated series of biosocial, environmental, behavioral and physical risk factors.  By understanding gun violence as a preventable disease and applying public health prevention techniques to this epidemic, healthcare professionals and their communities may develop systems of care to optimize gun safety, reduce risk and minimize public harm at every opportunity.

This course introduces students to the most prevalent public health issues related to the causes of gun violence, and explores the many multi-level health strategies that may be developed to prevent and treat gun violence in American society. Students will also gain exposure and experience in program design by creating, operationalizing and evaluating the impact of a novel, narrative-based educational framework for community outreach that unifies community stakeholders with their health systems, healthcare providers and first responders. Readings will involve both real-world programmatic documents/evaluations as well as peer-reviewed journal articles.

This course will be taught by Emergency Medicine Physician, Dr. Christopher Barsotti from AFFIRM: American Foundation for Firearm Injury Reduction.

(May 2, 3)

Peacebuilding Two: Be the change you want to see in the World (APA2240.03)

This Module will be a chance for students to reflect on their identities, inner issues they are aware or not aware and the desire to be social change agents. Together we will explore key topics of non-violent communication, personal potentials for peacebuilding, community building skills and different methods to deal with our individual daily struggles to be more effective human beings.

(April 10, 14, 17, 21, 24, 28)

Peacebuilding (APA2212.03)

This Module will serve as an introduction to the work of Peacebuilding around the world, both in theory and practice. Vahidin Omanovic, Director of Center for Peacebuilding in Bosnia, will be joining us to reflect on his work and introduce us to key topics in peacebuilding, including: peacebuilding in a local community, obstacles for peace, identity, discrimination, methods of sustainable peacebuilding.

(April 10, 14, 17, 21, 24, 28)

Women and Human Mobility (APA2213.03)

Human mobility has been an inherent human condition throughout history. From earliest human history, women and men have migrated in search of a better life, to populate other places on the planet, or to escape and survive human-made or natural dangers. Today migration is a fact of life for an increasing number of people around the world: there are more than 244 million migrants in the world, and almost half are women. The overwhelming majority of people who move do so inside their own country. However, migration can often involve cross-border movements, from a developing to a developed country, or more commonly within the same region.

Today, human mobility as a multi-causal phenomenon implies that people are migrating for a variety of reasons, which may be economic, social, political or environmental. Individuals migrate from the places where they were living because of the violence generated by State and non-State actors, armed conflicts, inequality, poverty, a lack of protection of economic, social and cultural rights, political instability, corruption, insecurity, various forms of discrimination, natural disasters, and the impact of climate change. Also, it may imply situations where men and women are physically transported across border without their consent, as in the case of trafficking. The factors that draw the migrant population are predominantly the prospect of better security, improved employment or educational opportunities, better access to services, more favorable climatic conditions, and others.

Many States have regulated migration through policies, laws, judgments and practices that directly violate the human rights of migrants and their families. At the same time, States have developed standards and mechanisms at the international, regional, bilateral and unilateral levels to regulate the flow of persons between States. The many laws, rules and regulations, fora and institutions through which States control international migration, either unilaterally or bilaterally for the most part, have resulted in a lack of consistency in global, regional and national governance of international migration that poses a challenge for the universal and regional codes developed for the protection of human rights.

Mobility is different for men and women, both in terms of the reasons why they migrate as well as the impact wile in transit and upon arrival to the destination and beyond. In this course we will explore the international rules that apply in different mobility scenarios focusing particularly in the effect that it has on women.

Through the course the students will explore:

– What is human mobility?
– How does human mobility particularly affects women?
– What are the main human rights challenges that create?
– What are the main international instruments that safeguard women in a mobility context?
– What is the role of the international and regional organizations?

The course will provide a comprehensive understanding of the effect on human mobility on women; how women’s human rights are affected by States’ policies and practices; and what is their protection under international human rights law.

(April 9, 13, 16, 20, 23, 27)

International Human Rights Law (APA2221.03)

Human rights are universal legal guarantees that protect individuals and groups against actions that interfere with fundamental freedoms and human dignity. Under international human rights law, States have the responsibility to respect, protect and fulfill human rights for all. If these obligations are not met, international legal action can be taken. Based on the international legal standards adopted by the international community through the time, this course aims to provide the students with the basic concepts of international human rights law, its sources, and the general protection institutions that exist to protect these guarantees. Through the course the students will explore:

– What are human rights?
– What are the main international instruments that safeguard human rights?
– Where do human rights rules come from?
– Who makes these rules? And who monitors those?
– What is the role of the international and regional organizations?

The course will provide a comprehensive understanding of the International Human Rights Law and its importance.

(April 9, 13, 16, 20, 23, 27)

Inclusion Practices (SCT4149.01)

Students enrolled in this course will meet weekly with the instructor to design and deliver programming for a spring term diversity conference.  Enrolled students will be expected to familiarize themselves with readings provided by the instructor and will submit weekly updates of proposed conference activities.  The final product will involve independent or collaborative programming activities for the conference and the submission of a written summary for compilation in a conference proceedings.

Delia Saenz
TBD (first seven weeks)
This course is categorized as All courses, SCT.

Social Dynamics of Inclusion (SCT2134.01)

This course will examine social psychological approaches to promoting inclusivity. Content will include review of basic psychological processes that contribute to, and maintain bias in contemporary society; and on methods that can promote collaboration across difference.  Topics will include:  confirmation bias, tokenism, intergroup dynamics, social justice, and related concepts.  Students will be expected to participate actively; examine, understand, and articulate different perspectives; and engage fully with the assigned readings and materials.  Weekly assignments include 1-2 readings and short reflection papers.  Students will also submit a final project that addresses a current area of exclusion at Bennington College.

Delia Saenz
W 2:10-4:00 (first seven weeks)
This course is categorized as All courses, SCT.

SCT Advanced Work Preparation Module (SCT4104.04)

This one credit module is designed for students preparing to do advanced work in SCT during Fall 2020. In a series of workshops, students will work on formulating clear lines of inquiry and developing a research plan for their advanced work in SCT. Students will look at various examples of advanced work as presented by current seniors. Various SCT faculty members will present techniques for designing a research project. Students will meet with their section leaders to begin preparing for their senior work. Assessment will be based on the development of an individual research proposal with an initial bibliography.

(May 10, 17, 24)

David Bond
Sun 6:00-9:00 (Fourth Module Block)
This course is categorized as All courses, SCT.

Visual Arts Lecture Series (VA2999.01)

Each term, Bennington offers a program of five-six lectures by visiting arts professionals: artists, curators, historians and critics, selected to showcase the diversity of contemporary art practices. Designed to enhance a broader and deeper knowledge of various disciplines in the Visual Arts and to stimulate campus dialogue around topical issues of contemporary art and culture, these thematically connected presentations offer students the opportunity to explore ideas from multiple perspectives over the course of the term. Students registered for this series must attend all lectures on Tuesday evenings at 7:00pm as well as gallery exhibitions, and are responsible for taking notes and completing a one-page essay-questionnaire for each event to be submitted via Populi. Optional readings and additional opportunities for engagement with visiting speakers may be announced throughout the term.

Sing (MUS2148.01)

We will gather once a week to sing rounds, chant, chorales, work songs, protest songs, sea chanteys, Sacred Harp, and folk songs from around the world. The words are less important than the joy of singing as a community. No performances- evaluation is by attendance only. We will use our ears and simple notation to learn the music- no previous singing experience is necessary.

Infinity (MAT2109.03)

A large part of modern mathematics has to do with how we conceptualize and manage the idea of infinity. This occurs in different places: the infinity of the horizon line that appeared with the development of perspective drawing, the infinitely small and infinitely many quantities of calculus, the infinite depth of fractals. This class will survey some of these concepts and briefly talk about how they are formalized in mathematics. There will be a particular emphasis on Cantor’s set theory, which was developed in the late nineteenth century, and which provided new logical tools and a new language to talk about infinite quantities. No mathematical background or knowledge will be assumed.

(April 10, 14, 17, 21, 24, 28)

Puzzles (MAT2108.01)

Much of higher mathematics has more in common with solving puzzles than it does with performing algebra drills. In this class, I will be proposing puzzles, and providing coaching and strategies for getting better at doing puzzles. Many of the reasoning skills will be valuable broadly in life, not only in mathematics. No special math knowledge will be needed.

(February 18, 21, 25, 28, March 3, 6)

Certainty (MAT2119.04)

Advanced mathematics is largely about logical argument, as much as it is computation or calculation. Over time, as each generation extended their ideas into new realms, they looked at the logical arguments of their predecessors and found that there were gaps, elisions, things that were not fully understood. One could imagine that this process might continue forever, but it does not: in the early twentieth century, a number of mathematicians (most notably Hilbert) completed the project of “hitting bedrock”, finding a clear demarcation line between certainty and uncertainty. This required a clarification about what mathematics and reasoning are about (“formalism”). These profound ideas deserve to be better known outside of professional mathematics. (Later, some mathematicians (notably Gödel) used this framework to show the limitations of the framework, in a different and more precise sense than before.) In this class we will go through the development of these ideas. No mathematical knowledge will be assumed.

(May 8, 12, 15, 19, 22, 26)

Sage City Symphony (MPF4100.01)

Sage City Symphony is a community orchestra which invites student participation. The Symphony is noted for the policy of commissioning new works by major composers, in some instances student composers, as well as playing the classics. There are openings in the string sections, and occasionally by audition for solo winds and percussion. There will be two concerts each term.

Logarithms (MAT2107.02)

Logarithms are one of the parts of mathematics that often remain a bit mysterious to people, even if they had no difficulty solving problems with them in school. In fact, logarithms are of far broader importance and interest than the narrow applications one usually sees; and seeing this broader picture helps in dispelling some of the mystery and in understanding what they are. In this class we will see new ways of counting, new ways of understanding number and estimating mentally, and new ways of comprehending data, all based in logarithms. I will not be assuming that you know or remember anything about logarithms; part of the point will be to explain them, from the beginning, in a variety of ways.

(March 17, 20, 24, 27, 31, April 3)

Speaking of Earth: Environmental Speeches that Moved the World (MOD2163.01)

In this course, based on the book Speaking of Earth, edited by Alon Tal, we will read twenty inspiring speeches by leading environmentalists around the world that examine a broad range of environmental issues. Included in the course is Rachel Carson’s defense of her ground breaking book Silent Spring, Prince Charles’s passionate call for sustainable agriculture, and the Dalai Lama’s explanation of a path to ecological harmony. The module will include participants in the class writing their own speech.