Archives

Field Course in Coral Reef Biology (BIO4239.01)

Coral reefs are among the most diverse, unique and beautiful of ecosystems on the planet.  Alas, they are also quite vulnerable to various environmental assaults and most of the reefs on earth are in real jeopardy.  In order to gain a more robust understanding of reefs, we will study reefs on site in the Caribbean. Students will learn the taxonomy, identification and characteristics of the animals that live in coral reefs.  The course will take place on the island of Grand Cayman. Students will have an opportunity to become certified scuba divers and participate in ongoing research. Students will collect and analyze fish inventory data and submit those data to the environmental organization, REEF (Reef Environmental Education Foundation).  Students will be able to compare their data with prior research. We will also discuss reef ecology with Tim Austin a research scientists with the Cayman Islands Department of the Environment. We will also participate in a beach clean-up activity.

This course will be offered over FWT (Jan. 4-11, 2020). Credits earned will count towards the credit requirements for Spring 2020. Registered students will receive a partial waiver for the number of hours normally required during FWT. 

Additional costs will be associated with this course.

The Ocean, The Creek, The Lake: Writing Water (LIT2405.02)

As water—through floods and droughts alike—continues to reshape the geography of the world around us, this course will look at waterscapes as written by women: Rachel Carson’s The Edge of the Sea, Annie Dillard’s A Pilgrim at Tinker Creek, and Terry Tempest Williams’s Refuge. Science, poetry, and ideas of conservation converge here. As a marine biologist, Carson wrote with exactitude and lyricism of the liminal environment, while Dillard’s evocative personal essays offer a glimpse into how the natural world can inform the human spirit. Williams offers a more elegiac account of landscape and family. The sensibilities and convictions of these women offer views to environmental literature that bring a different dimension to a genre of expression often associated with male adventure and audacity.

Kiln Firing: the Art and the Science (CER4272.01)

In Kiln Firing students will be exploring the science and art of firing a kiln by first operating and understanding electric kilns, then gas kilns (both oxidation and reduction, manual and automatic), and lastly exploring atmospheric firing and alternative firing processes. Bisque firing, cone 04, 6, and 10, basic maintenance and repair, loading and unloading bisque and glaze firings, and crystobalite formation and quartz inversion will all be investigated. This course will be largely self-directed building upon a basic foundation of knowledge with topics from each student’s specific interests. Some possible subjects for exploration are once, soda and/or salt, saggar, raku, pit, and wood firing, reduction for shinos and copper reds, developing microcrystals, firing for crystalline glazes, and reduction cooling among other possibilities. These objectives will be facilitated through demonstration and hands-on practice. The overarching goal of this class is to empower students with the technical knowledge to express themselves through ceramics coherently using a comprehensive understanding of the firing process. Firing is often an intimidating procedure for even the most advanced ceramic student, this class is designed to build each student’s confidence and comfort through full involvement in the firing process.

Some basic tools will be required.

Violin/Viola (MIN4345.01)

Studies in all left-hand position and shifting and an exploration of various bow techniques. Students can select from the concerto, sonata repertoire, short pieces and etudes for the study designed to develop technique, advanced musicianship and prepare for the performance.

Corequisites: Must participate and perform at least twice in Music Workshop (Tu. 6:30pm – 8:00pm)

Intermediate Violin/Viola (MIN4232.01)

Basic techniques will include the reading music in treble and /or alto cleft in basic keys. Hand position including left-hand sifting and fingering will be shown, and a rudimentary facility with the bow will be developed in order for students to participate in simple ensemble performances by the end of the term.

Corequisites: must participate and perform at least twice in Music Workshop (Tu. 6:30pm ~8pm)

Beginning Violin/Viola (MIN2241.01)

Basic techniques will include the reading of music in either treble/or alto clefs in the easy keys. Basic hand positions and appropriate fingerings will be shown, and a rudimentary facility with the bow will be developed in order that all students may participate in simple ensemble performance by the end of the term. The student must arrange for the use of a college instrument if needed (contact Music Coordinator, ext. #4519).

Corequisites: Participation Music Workshop T 6:30-8:00

Senior Projects (MPF4226.01)

This course will serve as a forum for technical planning and feedback for seniors scheduling a musical show or installation in Spring 2020. The majority of work for any senior show will be expected to be composed and/or collected by the beginning of the term. Students will be required to pick an advisor from appropriate music faculty to advise their particular projects as they develop. The course will introduce students to the challenges of sound design, drama, and visuals within a multi-disciplinary college community, and in creating successful collaborations, rehearsals, and techs.

Dancer as Maker (DAN4149.01)

Dancers working presently in the contemporary, experimental dance world do so in relation to the historical definitions of “the dancer,” all while deconstructing and recontextualizing its meaning. Dancers are makers in their own right inside choreographic structures. In this course, we will work with specific choreographic structures and scores, and use them as a frame to help understand how we participate in the process of making.  We will look at the choices we make as we help shape the choreography and performance. We will look at how we, as whole people, interact with the material. We will work with approaches to employing technical skill and elements such as movement quality and relationship to space, exploring our personal agency and presence.  As a final project we will study the efforts of a few dancers working presently in the contemporary experimental dance realm with major choreographers. We will be learning their choreographed material and also charting their perceived methods for engaging in and performing the work. We will be asking questions like: What was their training model? What influenced their work? How did they integrate themselves into the whole concept?

Movement Practice: Partnering (DAN2179.01)

In this class we will move in and out of physical contact with other dancers and objects. As a foundation for the partnering, we will work on proprioception, an awareness of one’s own body, and how this is communicated to a partner.

In turn, each person needs to develop skills in receiving information from the partner, without necessarily seeing them.

With others, we will explore weight sharing, center sharing, and counter balancing, to give ourselves a broad understanding of different pathways, ideas, and how to use them. Standing up, sitting down, or upside down we will learn to process and direct the information our bodies are sending and receiving. We will work with technical exercises, choreographies, and improvisational scores.

Theory of Impressionism (MTH4112.01)

This seminar will look at works by Claude Debussy and Maurice Ravel, as well as by Erik Satie, Les Six, Fauré, and diverse U.S. composers at the turn of the 20th century. We will start by looking at Debussy’s Preludes as a microcosm of his harmonic style, and then analyze major orchestral works. Ravel’s Tombeau de Couperin, String Quartet, and select songs will also be analyzed. Students will be expected to write analyses of short works, and to contextualize the innovations of Debussy and Ravel within the complex literary and visual styles of fin-de-siècle France. This course will have special assignments for those who wish to explore advanced harmonic analyses of these works. Students must be able to read notation fluently.

Piano Lab II (MIN4236.01)

The goals of this course are to gain ease and dexterity at the keyboard, developing a confident piano technique and the skill of reading musical notation. Students will expand upon the skills learned in Piano lab I, adding to a basic repertoire of scales and chords, use them in improvisation and harmonization of melodies. In addition they will explore a repertoire that utilizes the musical components covered and learn to perform selected compositions.

Piano Lab I (MIN2232.01)

Introductory course in basic keyboard skills. Topics include reading notation, improvisation, rhythm, technique, and general musicianship

Piano (MIN4333.02, section 2)

Individual private lessons for advanced students. Audition required. Weekly meetings times on scheduled class days arranged with the instructor. Participation in music workshop and end-of-term recital required.

Corequisites: Must participate in Music Workshop (Tuesday, 6:30 – 8pm).

Piano (MIN4333.01, section 1)

Individual private lessons for advanced students. Audition required. Weekly meetings times on scheduled class days arranged with the instructor. Participation in music workshop and end-of-term recital required.

Corequisites: Must participate in Music Workshop (Tuesday, 6:30 – 8pm).

Piano (MIN4333.03, section 3)

Individual private lessons for advanced students. Audition required. Weekly meetings times on scheduled class days arranged with the instructor. Participation in music workshop and end-of-term recital required.

Corequisites: Must participate in Music Workshop (Tuesday, 6:30 – 8pm).

Shorter Songs (MTH4110.01)

What elements set certain composers apart from their contemporaries? In any genre, there are those who “raise the bar” and gain respect both for being prolific and breaking traditions of harmony and form. Jazz saxophonist Wayne Shorter took his cue from ground-breaking composers before him such as Duke Ellington and Thelonius Monk, helping to create new directions in jazz while being a member of the bands Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers, Miles Davis Quintet and Weather Report in the 1960s and 1970s. We will examine many of the songs written for these groups, as well as those written for his many albums as a leader (for Blue Note Records), looking at his unique way of combining melody, harmony and rhythm. Students will also be encouraged to compose and arrange “short” songs, using some of the techniques learned. Compositions will be performed in Music Workshop.

Dance Making: The Ephemeral Artifact (DAN2137.01)

This course is an introduction to the creative process of dance making. We will look at choreography as a format for arranging bodies and movement; considering time, space, and emotion in performance based work. We will explore, improvise, watch, and discuss our work and the work of others.  We will develop personal movement material from multiple sources and investigate our personal process as it relates to contemporary performance.

Jazz Piano Lab (MIN4335.01)

This course will utilize Bennington’s Piano Lab to explore and develop the skills and knowledge required to effectively play non-classical piano repertoire. Styles covered are: blues, reggae, salsa, bossa-nova and jazz. Students will take turns learning and playing bass lines, chord voicings, stylistic rhythms, melodies and improvised solos.

Corequisites: Must participate in Music Workshop (Tuesday, 6:30 – 8pm).

Jazz Piano (MIN4240.01)

Weekly private instruction in jazz piano to be arranged with instructor. Explore and develop skills and knowledge required to effectively play non-classical piano repertoire. Styles covered: blues, reggae, salsa, bossa-nova and jazz. Create bass lines, chord voicings, stylistic rhythms, melodies and improvised solos.

Clarinet (MIN4223.01)

Study of clarinet technique and repertoire with an emphasis on tone production, dexterity, reading skills, and improvisation. This course is for intermediate-advanced students only.

Corequisites: Students will be requested to show work during the term at Music Workshop (Tuesday, 6:30 – 8 pm).

Saxophone (MIN4237.01)

Study of saxophone technique and standard repertoire (jazz or classical), with an emphasis on tone production, dexterity, reading skills, and improvisation. This course is for intermediate-advanced students only.

Corequisite: Must participate in Music Workshop (T 6:30pm-8:00pm)

Advanced Digital Modeling and Animation (MA2107.01)

This course introduces students to the basic language of 3D animation and modeling. Students will be expected to become familiar with the basic principles of the MAYA program. A series of modeled objects placed in locations will be created. The emphasis will be on becoming proficient with modeling forms, texturing using Arnold Renderer, adding lights and cameras.

Intermediate Voice (MVO4301.04, section 4)

For students of varying levels of singing ability. Vocal production and physiology will be discussed. Group warm-ups and vocalizations will incorporate exercises to develop breath control, resonance, projection, range, color, and agility. The fundamental concepts of singing will be explored in the preparation of specific song assignments. Personalization of text and emotional expression will be addressed. Students will study and perform traditional classical song literature (including early Italian songs, 17-18th century arias and repertoire in several languages) to strengthen and to facilitate technical growth before moving on to other contemporary styles. Students will have half-hour repertory sessions every other week with an accompanist. Students must have previous voice experience and/or study, and some music literacy.

Corequisites: Attendance and participation in Music Workshop Tuesday 6:30-8PM

Intermediate Voice (MVO4301.03, section 3)

For students of varying levels of singing ability. Vocal production and physiology will be discussed. Group warm-ups and vocalizations will incorporate exercises to develop breath control, resonance, projection, range, color, and agility. The fundamental concepts of singing will be explored in the preparation of specific song assignments. Personalization of text and emotional expression will be addressed. Students will study and perform traditional classical song literature (including early Italian songs, 17-18th century arias and repertoire in several languages) to strengthen and to facilitate technical growth before moving on to other contemporary styles. Students will have half-hour repertory sessions every other week with an accompanist. Students must have previous voice experience and/or study, and some music literacy.

Corequisites: Attendance and participation in Music Workshop Tuesday 6:30-8PM

Intermediate Voice (MVO4301.02, section 2)

For students of varying levels of singing ability. Vocal production and physiology will be discussed. Group warm-ups and vocalizations will incorporate exercises to develop breath control, resonance, projection, range, color, and agility. The fundamental concepts of singing will be explored in the preparation of specific song assignments. Personalization of text and emotional expression will be addressed. Students will study and perform traditional classical song literature (including early Italian songs, 17-18th century arias and repertoire in several languages) to strengthen and to facilitate technical growth before moving on to other contemporary styles. Students will have half-hour repertory sessions every other week with an accompanist. Students must have previous voice experience and/or study, and some music literacy.

Corequisites: Attendance and participation in Music Workshop Tuesday 6:30-8PM

Intermediate Voice (MVO4301.01, section 1)

For students of varying levels of singing ability. Vocal production and physiology will be discussed. Group warm-ups and vocalizations will incorporate exercises to develop breath control, resonance, projection, range, color, and agility. The fundamental concepts of singing will be explored in the preparation of specific song assignments. Personalization of text and emotional expression will be addressed. Students will study and perform traditional classical song literature (including early Italian songs, 17-18th century arias and repertoire in several languages) to strengthen and to facilitate technical growth before moving on to other contemporary styles. Students will have half-hour repertory sessions every other week with an accompanist. Students must have previous voice experience and/or study, and some music literacy.

Corequisites: Attendance and participation in Music Workshop Tuesday 6:30-8PM

 

Thomas Bogdan
Tu 10:30-12:20
This course is categorized as All courses, Voice.

Movement Practice: Beginning-Intermediate Dance Technique (DAN2119.01)

In this basic intermediate dance course, students are introduced to some fundamental principles of dancing by learning various movement patterns. The class also introduces the use of breath and somatic practices, which reflect some principles of Zen and Japanese somatic practices such as butoh and Water Body Movement (or Noguchi Taiso).  Attention will be given to cultivating and sharpening each student’s awareness of time, space and energy, in order to understand and maximize the individual’s unique physical impulses and expressions.  At the same time, we will be disciplining the body to move rhythmically and precisely with clear intentions and awareness.

Movement Practice: Advanced Dance Technique (DAN4344.01)

This advanced level movement practice is designed for students with prior experience in dance technique. In this class, we will hone in on the importance of balancing controlled and spontaneous action as well as internal and external movement through using a series of improvisational and compositional practices. We will be learning longer and complex movement phrases that are structured with principles from Water Body Movement (“Body is a container filled with water. Movements are a flow of the water.”) Bringing conscious thought and heightened awareness to both interior and exterior spaces, we deepen our understanding about the unity of our body/mind and how it functions as a whole. We aim to maximize each student’s performance skills and cultivate personal ways to understand how to use one’s own body.

The Scriptorium: Ekphrasis (LIT2225.01)

This scriptorium, a “place for writing,” functions as a class for writers interested in improving their academic essay-writing skills. We will read to write and write to read. Much of our time will be occupied with writing and revising—essai means “trial” or “attempt”—as we work to create new habits and strategies for our analytical writing. As we practice various essay structures with the aim of developing a persuasive, well-supported thesis, we will also revise collaboratively, improve our research skills, and study grammar and style. Our aim is to learn to write with complexity, imagination, and clarity, as we explore the genre of Ekphrasis, which can be simply defined an artistic description of a work of art, a rhetorical device in which one medium of art responds to another. We will study classical and modern examples of ekphrasis and read critical theory about representation, influence, copies, modernity, verisimilitude, beauty, and truth. We will ask ourselves these pressing questions: how can we accurately and imaginatively describe a work of art? How can we capture a work’s meaning, form, and effect on the audience? What are the tensions and possibilities between literature and the visual arts? Readings may include texts by Plato, Berger, Wilde, Homer, Scarry, Benjamin, Ovid, Keats, Browning, Young, Loy, Auden, Coste Lewis, hooks, Dijkstra, Hall, Sontag, Mitchell.

Life Drawing Lab (DRW2118.01)

Drawing Lab provides an opportunity for student artists of all experience levels to further develop their skills with observational-based drawing. Working primarily with the human figure, students build increased understanding of the poetic, dynamic, and inherently abstract nature of drawing, while paying close attention to the potential of formal elements such as shape, line, form, and the creation of pictorial space. Although each class period provides structures and activities within which students work, the ultimate aim of this class to allow students the time and space necessary to further develop their drawing skills so as to best support individual projects and concerns. Class time is divided between drawing from life, discussing student work, and examining the use of the figure in visual art, using both contemporary and historical examples. Please note that this course may require additional materials to be purchased by the student.

Note: Much of this class will be spent drawing the nude human form.

Projection_Mapping_Design (MA4106.01)

The class will be concerned with investigating the interaction of projected imagery with an actor/performer/viewer.

Investigation will center on how projections can be integrated into, and bring further information to a location, a set and or a text. Various examples will be looked at and researched.

Two plays or texts will be used as a basis for two projects and for each, projections will be designed, and tested including different locations and on different surfaces.

The images can be created in a number of programs, with the content and how this works with the locations will be the main focus. Instruction on Qab and Madmapper will be included and used for the tests along with other software.

Advanced Butoh Practice-Body as Landscape (DAN4139.01)

This course is designed for students with prior experience in dance technique or movement practice. By using a series of somatic, improvisational and compositional practices inspired by butoh, we will develop ways of embodying unorthodox and complex ideas dealing with the ever-becoming, inconsumable, and vaporizing body. Students will be encouraged to closely observe and keep their awareness open toward what is occurring in both outer and inner landscapes, aiming at composing new relationships between them. In this way, we work to maximize our perceptions and to control the subtle energy and expression of each body part.

Introduction to Butoh Practice-Impulsive Body (DAN2180.01)

No previous experience in dance or movement practice is required. This course is open to any students who are interested in investigating a relationship between their impulse and movements, and where those impulses come from. By studying some principles and practices of butoh, which originated in Japan as a contemporary avant-garde dance form, we aim to liberate ourselves from pre-fixed images of our bodies and search for alternate and original ways of approaching them.

Advanced Voice (MVO4401.01)

Advanced study of vocal technique and the interpretation of the vocal repertoire, designed for advanced students who have music as a plan concentration and to assist graduating seniors with preparation for senior recitals. Students are required to study and to perform a varied spectrum of vocal repertory for performance and as preparation for further study or graduate school. A class maximum of five voice students will meet for one-hour individual session/coachings with the instructor each week (to be scheduled with the instructor). Students will also have an individual half-hour session with a pianist each week to work on repertory.

Corequisites: Participation and performance in Music Workshop Tuesday 6:30-8PM

Movement Practice: Beginning Dance Technique (DAN2121.01)

In this course for beginners, we will work with imagery to help explore potential in the body.We will practice kinesthetic exercises that will help expand movement range, strength, and specificity.Emphasis will be placed on understanding the feeling of movement, deeply, and trusting it.From this we can understand how this feeling moves the body, and eventually how this body moves the space and bodies around it.

There are different kinds of effort involved in moving. We will look at these specifics in order to understand our affinities for particular movement. Once understood, it may open up a wide vocabulary. We will work on duration and endurance, so that they are not a hindrance. From there we can redetermine our capacities.

Woodcut Printmaking on the Vandercook Proofing Press (PRI2123.02)

Vandercook Proofing Presses were once a vital aspect of the printing industry and have been adopted widely by artists for letterpress printing and book arts. Bennington College is fortunate to possess three Vandercooks, housed in the Word and Image Lab.

Using type-high plywood blocks, oil-based and non-toxic, water-soluble inks, we will examine different approaches to mark-making: from graphic and angular to painterly and gestural. We will cover color mixing, printing in multiple-colors and producing multiples/editions.

Students will learn image preparation and transfer methods, sharpening and care of tools, wood carving methods, ink and paper preparation, hand-inking and rolling techniques, printing on the Vandercook proofing press and by hand. Additional areas of experimentation may include using stencils, layering color and a variety of monotype techniques and embossment.

Experienced and beginning woodcutters/relief printmakers are welcome to join us.

Introduction to 3D Modeling: Point, Curve, Surface, Solid (VA2117.01)

This course explores methods of translating found or imagined shapes into digital three-dimensional objects. Students will study how sub-division, approximation, and discretization can be used to separate forms into their component parts. Coursework will focus on how systematic breaking-down of form reveals qualities that can be intentionally altered, thus changing their properties. Through exercises that explore part-to-whole relationships students will be introduced to Rhinoceros—an industry standard 3D modeling program—and learn how to create inputs for 3D printers and laser-cutters. By the end of the course, each student will have completed a digital model, a set of orthographic drawings, and a physical model.

I am a Material (SCU4112.02)

What is a more valuable piece of matter? Could it be something that will degrade in this art world and be okay? String, cotton-balls and rubber bands may be what should be affixed to your unique prosthetic to complete a task given.

This course will cover information and techniques related to body casting, wire rope rigging, fabricating, building processes and encourage personal material resourcing. This is a project based performance course in which you will have problems set to define and complete. Your found solution will be evaluated on how thoroughly you analyzed the task, by way of experimentation of intent represented in prototyping and drawings, as well as showing a final function.

A Material World (SCU2113.01)

This course is directed at the student who is interested in furthering a visual vocabulary and conceptual enhancement through material introductions and demonstrations. The class will be based primarily on mastering methods of working with both thermo forming and thermo setting plastics. Often I have students come to me and ask how they can find some solution to the way a project may be leading them…the answer is never simple, on the contrary, this class will introduce you to learning around a problem. Observing close to what you were looking for however understanding that these decisions on material selection and their safe manipulation will create and develop new rich conceptual directions. Questions about questions like: Is this the most interesting solution? What is interesting? The foundation of this course is designed around the encouragement to experiment fearlessly towards finding a richer material language.

Bennington Review: A Practicum in Literary Publishing and Editing-Poetry (LIT4330.02, section 2)

This two-credit course involves working on selecting and editing the content of Bennington’s recently relaunched national print literary magazine, Bennington Review. Students will serve as Editorial Assistants for the magazine, studying and practicing all aspects of magazine editing. The course will also engage students in discussions of contemporary print and digital literary culture, and of the history of literary magazines. Students will be selected in part based on their familiarity with contemporary literature, as well as for prior experience in editing or publishing. Students should anticipate plenty of work for two credits, as well as an immersive, hands-on, professional experience.

Corequisite: Students will be required to attend all Wednesday Literature Evenings and Poetry at Bennington events.

Bennington Review: A Practicum in Literary Editing and Publishing-Prose (LIT4330.01, section 1)

This two-credit course involves working on selecting and editing the content of Bennington’s recently relaunched national print literary magazine, Bennington Review. Students will serve as Editorial Assistants for the magazine, studying and practicing all aspects of magazine editing. The course will also engage students in discussions of contemporary print and digital literary culture, and of the history of literary magazines. Students will be selected in part based on their familiarity with contemporary literature, as well as for prior experience in editing or publishing. Students should anticipate plenty of work for two credits, as well as an immersive, hands-on, professional experience.

St. Augustine and Literary Confession (LIT2339.01)

We live in an age of rampant confession, so it can be difficult to conceive of a world without it. Augustine’s Confessions—which the Bishop of Hippo dictated to a team of scribes between 397 and 400 C.E.—is one of those rare literary works that marks a very clear before and after. In this two-credit course we’ll spend the term reading the whole of the Confessions slowly and with care, examining it within the historical context of Late Antiquity and the Christianization of the Roman Empire. We’ll trace Plato’s ideas about the Soul and Neoplatonic notions of good and evil as Augustine syncretizes them into religious doctrine. We’ll treat the text as a form of ongoing prayer that divides the “I” and the “me” and invents a self that we can only call Modern. “Grant me chastity and continence,” Augustine prays while he is living in sin, “but not yet.” This ambivalence is the real engine of the conversion narrative and memoir as we have come to know it. We will periodically sample literary confession from different periods to get a sense of how literary forms have adapted to the confessional impulse. Students will keep a reading journal, write frequent critical response papers, and devise a final project that is a creative confession of their own.

Movement Practice: Intermediate Dance Technique (DAN4236.01)

In this intermediate level course, we will focus on tapping into the subtle connections in the body. We will be using improvisational scores and somatic exercises to hone these connections and increase self-awareness. Gentle focus can be used to achieve high intensity movement. Tracking what we are doing as we do it–we will acknowledge the nervous system’s role in our movement efforts. It is important that we are able to do this with a non-judgmental mindset.  We will learn to watch openly, gathering information from others, to increase possibilities in performance.

Performance Art (DAN2129.01)

This class explores the concepts, questions and ideas of performance and performance practice. The class will cover a range of modalities in creating and developing performance. Using text, scores and improvisation to generate material and expand the palette and practice of art making. This work will focus on the corporeal and experiential aspect of developing performance work. Through viewing recorded performances, interviews and reading materials, we will study a range of perspectives in the field of performance. Students are required to create individual and collaborative work reflecting the concepts and practices studied during the semester.

Advanced Projects in Dance (DAN4795.01)

This is an essential course for students involved in making work for performance this term. Attention is given to all of the elements involved in composition and production, including collaborative aspects. Students are expected to show their work throughout stages of development, complete their projects, and perform them to the public by the end of the term. Dance Workshop is required.

Corequisites: Dance Workshop attendance

The Politics of Student Movements in the ’60s (SCT2141.01)

To most of you, the 1960’s might seem like ancient history. There wasn’t even social media! You might be surprised to find out that many of the problems confronted by the student movement during that time are the same as problems we see today. Although the student uprisings seemed focused on the Vietnam War, many other issues were part of the struggle: workers strikes, antiracist actions, the changing role of women in society, the question of violence/pacifism, and the ecological crisis. This seven-week class will use readings, discussions, guest speakers, and individual projects to examine the role of SDS (Students for a Democratic Society) in mobilizing a national movement based on grassroots organizing, its part in generating antiwar sentiment, and its location within the broader terrain of ’60s struggles.

Janet Foley, John Hultgren
M/Th 1:40-3:30 (first seven weeks)
This course is categorized as All courses, SCT.

Isadora: Real-Time Media Manipulation for Performance (DA2136.02)

This class will introduce Isadora, a software designed for artists, designers and performers to add interactive media and video to their projects. Through a drag and drop node based interface you can control your media in real time, editing your video and audio on the fly or incorporating live video and audio feeds. Together we will learn the logic of the software and best practices for media management and equipment set up in pursuit of our creative ideas.

Bennington Plays: Design (DRA4129.01)

This project-based class is for designers developing and implementing scenic, lighting, or costume designs for productions of new student written plays. Teams of directors and designers will work with other students in corresponding courses for playwrights, directors and actors, who are participating in the Bennington Plays Festival.

In a laboratory atmosphere, we will collaboratively develop an overall design approach for the festival, as well as specific designs for each play (either individually or collectively). Richard MacPike (Technical Instructor in Costume Production) will provide guidance and mentoring to costume designers. Particular attention will be placed on collaboration and communication between designers and directors, but also among and between all participants. Designers will meet once a week on Monday evenings and also attend drama production meetings on Mondays from 5:30-6:30 pm, through the performances in early to mid May. Students will also write a post-performance reflective essay.

Advanced Mixing Techniques (MSR4365.01)

This course will offer an advanced study in studio practices. We will explore various mixing objectives and techniques through critical listening sessions, analysis, and hands-on projects. We will focus on the fundamentals as well as advanced practices of mixing, shaping the sounds through dynamic range processors and modulation tools, and various other techniques. Students will have an opportunity to practice their mixing skills through multitracks, make their own creative remixes, and share their work in-class with their peers for feedback. This course is for students who have previous experience in recording studio practices and/or with preexisting projects.

Spatial Audio Practices (MSR4051.01)

This course will offer an introduction to the principles of spatial audio and its function in creative sound practices. The topics will include multichannel audio, Ambisonics and binaural sound, 360 spatial audio recording and mixing, sound design for VR, and immersive electroacoustic music. Along with readings and discussions, we will look at various current sound practices that explore the possibilities of spatial audio. There will be an emphasis on production and experiential learning through exercises and workshops. This course is for students who have previous experience in sound recording practices and/or e-music.

Intermedia Performance (MPF4225.01)

In this course, we will focus on hybrid practices and explore various forms of intermedia art such as video/audio mashups, audiovisual performance and installation, movement for the camera, and sound and video for movement. The readings and discussions will give an introduction to the intermedia art practice as well as the history of early audiovisual tools, theories on audiovisual perception, video as an intermedium, and aesthetics of collage. The emphasis will be on hands-on practice: students will be encouraged to work with found/archival footage, video camera and projection techniques, sound recordings and audio transducers, as well as learn how to design their performative setups.

Queer French (in English) (FRE2109.01)

In this advanced course, we will examine French culture’s engagement with questions of sexuality and gender, with a focus on authors, artists, theorists, and others who have questioned ideas of normative sexuality from the Middle Ages through the 21st century. Authors and texts to be studied will include Marguerite de Navarre, l’Abbé de Choisy, Diderot, Monique Wittig, Virginie Despentes, Guillaume Dustan, Abdellah Taïa, Edouard Louis, Bambi (Sebastian Lifshitz), and Parole de King (Chriss Lag). Advanced level. Conducted in English.

Jazz Ensemble (MPF4250.01)

This ensemble will perform a wide range of Jazz music (a genre that is constantly evolving), with an emphasis on both ensemble playing and improvisation skills. By playing together, students will learn how blues, swing, Latin, and rock elements have all fueled this music called jazz. Students will also learn how major Jazz artists such as Ellington, Monk, Mingus, Wayne Shorter, Ornette Coleman and others have approached composition. As a group we will explore different techniques for playing over chord changes and ways to make improvised solos more interesting, both harmonically and rhythmically. Whether playing a jazz standard, a student composition, or free music, the emphasis will be on listening and on interacting with each other, finding ways to create blend, groove, dynamic contrast, and tension/release. Students will also be encouraged to bring in arrangements, transcriptions, and compositions, which will be read and developed by the ensemble. Students need to have adequate technique on a musical instrument, be able to read music and have a basic understanding of harmony (chord structures, chord-scales, etc.)

Song for Ireland and Celtic Connections (MHI2251.01)

Celtic history and music from Ireland, Scotland, Bretagne, Galatia, and Cape Breton will be experienced, studied, and performed using instruments and voices. We’ll find and cross the musical bridges between regions–from the ballads of Ireland, Scotland and Wales to the Alalas of Spain and dance tunes of Brittany. An end-of-term presentation will be prepared drawing on inspiration from traditional forms. Students must bring a guitar, banjo, mandolin, or fiddle (or other social instrument) to class for purposes of furthering personal music making through traditional forms. We will practice and perform as a group, improving our reading and aural skills.

Mandolin (MIN2229.01)

Beginning, intermediate and advanced group or individual lessons on the mandolin will be offered. Student will learn classical technique on the mandolin and start to develop a repertoire of classical and traditional folk pieces. Simple song sheets with chords, tablature, and standard notation, chord theory, and scale work will all be used to further skills. Students will be expected to perform at Music Workshop, or as part of a concert, in ensemble and/or solo. Depending on scheduling, these will be individual or group lessons.

Ukulele Comprehensive (MIN2230.01)

A comprehensive course on learning skills on the ukulele. We will learn the history of the uke and both traditional and contemporary styles. Music theory and playing techniques will be covered and students will be expected to perform as a group or individually at Music Workshop. Students must have their own soprano or tenor ukulele.

Fiddle (MIN4327.01)

For the experienced (2+years of playing) violinist. Lessons in traditional styles of fiddling – Quebecois, New England, Southern Appalachian, Cajun, Irish, and Scottish. This tutorial is designed to heighten awareness of the variety of ways the violin is played regionally and socially in North America (and indeed around the world these days) and to give practical music skills for furthering personal music making. Students will be expected to perform at Music Workshop, or as part of a concert, in ensemble and/or solo.

Traditional Music Ensemble (MPF4221.01)

We will study and perform from the string band traditions of rural America. Nova Scotia, Quebecois, Irish, New England, Scandinavian, African American dance and ballad traditions will also be experienced with listening, practice (weekly group rehearsals outside of class), and performing components. Emphasis on ensemble intuition, playing by ear, and lifetime personal music making skills (transposition, harmonizing, etc.). Previous playing experience required on one or more of the following instruments: violin, guitar, banjo, mandolin, bass accordion, concertina, penny whistle, flute, bodhran, harp, ukulele, or piano. Students must have three to five years of instrument playing experience, and must have their own instrument or arrange for instrument use per term.

Banjo (MIN2215.01)

Beginning, intermediate, or advanced group lessons on the 5-string banjo in the claw-hammer/frailing style. Student will learn to play using simple song sheets with chords, tablature, and standard notation. Using chord theory and scale work, personal music-making skills will be enhanced. Awareness of traditional styles of playing the instrument will be furthered through a listening component and ensemble playing with other instrumentalists.

Exodus (LIT2320.01)

In this two-credit class, we focus on the second book of the Bible. Full of earthly incident (oppression, banishment, plagues, exile) and numinous drama (God’s revealing himself to Moses, the Covenant, the giving of the Ten Commandments), Exodus is, of course, a foundational text for Jews; for millenia, it has also been a magnet for poets, novelists, philosophers, composers, theologians, historians, and political thinkers, activists, and revolutionaries. Exodus is the text in which the Hebrew God injects Himself into history; much of our thinking will be about this momentous event, and the accompanying commandment to remember, perhaps best expressed by the Hebrew Zakhor. We will also consider the character of “the man Moses,” who was a conflicted, uneasy leader, who tried to dissuade God from naming him his messenger, and who fought bitterly not only with those he was charged to protect, but with God himself. We read this text as a (collective) work of literature, and so you will need to be attentive to modes of narration, framing, pacing, voice, and patterns of imagery.

Art of Auditioning (DRA2178.01)

Auditions are an opportunity to develop your artistic voice and your confidence in that voice through self-critique. In this class we will work to demystify the process of auditioning and understand how to prepare and present work under challenging circumstances. We will cover cold readings, monologue and prepared scenes, with an in depth look at each step of the process, from the artist’s point of view. We will address physical movement, text analysis, making choices, taking direction, interviewing, prep and post audition activity in order to experience the entire audition as a work of artistic expression. We will work towards developing a sense of self-evaluation that allows us to be independent of the need for feedback as well as the skills to participate in constructive feedback sessions. Students present work weekly.

Songs in the key of Wonder (MTH4148.01)

Songs in the key of Wonder is a songwriting seminar based on the classic 1976 release, Songs in the Key of Life, by Stevie Wonder. Students will look at select discography and learn the chord progressions that Mr. Wonder used in writing this landmark album, in addition to his multiple hit songs. We will dissect and understand the music by using theory, form and analysis, and arranging that he used in his recordings and performances. By the second half of the term students will use these progressions to create and arrange their own original songs and compositions. We will also look at other contemporary artists influenced by Mr. Wonder’s style such as, Prince, Michael Jackson, D’Angelo, Musiq Soulchild, Erykah Badu, and Janelle Monáe to name a few.

Bebop, Rock & Beyond II (MIN4226.01)

Bebop, Rock & Beyond II is a drum set course that will continue to build on the musical techniques associated with cutting edge drummers while expanding your musicianship and performing abilities. We will continue to look at the drumming architects of Bebop, Rock, and innovative musicians who are taking drum set playing Beyond the traditions of rock and jazz. This course is for drummers who have taken drum set lessons, practice regularly, and are looking to learn and fine-tune their fundamentals in these musical styles on this instrument. We will continue to work on music notation, analyzing specific work, and learning specific pieces. We will use audio, video, and technology to broaden and enhance our learning experience while understanding tuning and what it takes to maintain acoustic drums. This course requires the successful passing of Bebop, Rock & Beyond I or approval from the instructor.

Drumming: An Extension of Language (MIN2120.01)

This course serves as an introduction to rhythms, chants, and musical practices from Africa, Brazil, Cuba, Haiti, and the African Diaspora. Using indigenous percussion instruments from these territories, students will use their hands, mallets, and sticks to play traditional folkloric rhythms and melodies. Additional topics will cover history, culture, language, and dance. This class serves the greater Bennington community in the spring by partnering with the South Western Vermont Medical Center, Bennington Project Independence, and the Village School of North Bennington. Near the end of term students will share their work in celebration with these organizations . A weekly practice lab is expected.

Graduate Assistantship in Public Action (APA5101.02, section 2)

Graduate students in Public Action are integrated into the CAPA and related discipline areas as teaching assistants. In consultation with the faculty, MFA candidates develop an assistantship schedule of approximately 5 hours weekly.

Graduate Assistantship in Public Action (APA5101.01, section 1)

Graduate students in Public Action are integrated into the CAPA and related discipline areas as teaching assistants. In consultation with the faculty, MFA candidates develop an assistantship schedule of approximately 5 hours weekly.

A Dual Narrative Approach to the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict (APA2246.01)

Sari Nusseibeh, a Palestinian philosopher and past President of Al-Quds University, and Yossi Klein Halevi, an Israeli journalist, have each authored books from their perspectives, analysis, and insights into the Palestinian-Israeli conflict. Nusseibeh’s book is called, “Once Upon a Country: A Palestinian Life,” while Halevi’s book is called, “Letters to My Palestinian Neighbor.” In this class we will read both books, as an example of a dual narrative approach, and as vehicle to try to better understand this conflict which is often called intractable.

Cello (MIN4355.01)

Studio instruction in cello. There will be an emphasis on creating and working towards an end-of-term performance for each student. Students must have had at least three years of cello study.

Corequisites: Music Workshop attendance 7 times per term.

Creative Economies (APA2167.02)

This course is designed for students of all disciplines who are interested in connecting their discrete creations (a poem, a drawing, an artwork, a product, an event) to larger systems, organizations, and possible art worlds. In this course, we will examine the ways in which every aspect of your production and distribution process — from sourcing materials to organizing your studio to licensing and acquisition — can deepen your work and remind people of your intentions as an artist. Through in-person meetings, guest presentations, group activities, and readings, you will be introduced to contemporary artists and designers who consider the entire life of their projects, and who develop ways for their projects to circulate in multiple art and design worlds. You will be exposed to a range of creations and systems, from networks of conceptual artists to solidarity co-ops, from alternative currency groups to online start-ups. Throughout the course, you will be challenged to identify art worlds that are appropriate to your work and to your concerns, drawing connections to a series of organizations, collectives and interconnected art and design worlds.

Understanding PFOA: Science and Policy (ENV2173.01)

The water supply of Hoosick Falls, NY, Bennington’s western neighbor, has been contaminated with Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) by past industrial activity. PFOA is an “emerging contaminant” that is correlated with a range of health problems. This course will investigate the social and physical aspects of this ongoing disaster, from how the regulation of chemicals in the US shaped this disaster to how the specific chemistry of PFOA guides its environmental and biological pathways to how the geological structure of an aquifer influences the distribution and direction of a groundwater contaminant plume. Students will gain formal training in environmental organic chemistry and toxicology, contaminant hydrogeology, and environmental policy. This class will also conduct field research on the water contamination in Hoosick Falls and Bennington. Students will learn how to collect water samples, interpret laboratory data, and use geospatial analysis techniques and technology to characterize a groundwater plume. Students are also expected to help faculty prepare presentations of the early findings of our research to citizen’s groups in Hoosick Falls. Students in this class will be expected to help develop curricular materials that can be used in area public schools.

An Introduction to Dance Phrasemaking and Performing (DAN2136.01)

This is designed for those who are interested in making movement phrase material and “taking it for a ride.” We will be creating new phrases constantly and paying full attention to detail, nuance and finesse when performing them. We will be thoroughly investigating, modifying, rearranging, exploding, and ultimately reconsidering our understanding of the phrases made. By focusing on the use of time, we will find out more about its intricate relationship to space and motion. While paying keen attention to phrasing, we will notice the impact of shifting attention itself.

Students are expected to create and develop new phrase material of their own, teach this work to others, learn material from others, and rehearse outside of class. Phrases may be combined into larger dance scores that will then be performed in dance workshops or studio showings.

Participation in Dance Workshop (Th 6:30 pm-7:50 pm) is highly recommended.

Co-requisites: Dance or Drama lab assignment if students sign up for more 4 or more credits in dance.

Photo Now (PHO2141.01)

This course explores the evolution of contemporary photography from the late 20th century to the present day. We will be looking at a wide range of influences from identity politics, TV and film, social media, and the move from analog to digital technologies. The class format will be weekly faculty lectures accompanied by student research and presentations. Students will keep a journal and complete a midterm and final assignment.

Painterly Painters & Portraiture (AH4122.01)

According to art historical tradition, “painterly painters” are those whose work exhibits a gestural, often loose, facture that makes the viewer conscious of its painted quality through visible brushwork, inchoate, haptic, blotches and sometimes, heavy impasto. Portraits, like painterly painting, are thought to be largely concerned with fixing or situating individuality, particularity, figuration v. abstraction, and even identity construction, subjectivity, and self-awareness. Together this range of concerns will structure a selective study of the portrait painters (who should be) best known for their virtuosic coloring and painterliness including, but not limited to: Titian, Rubens, Van Dyck, Velázquez, Ribera, Reynolds, Carriera, Boucher, Goya, Manet, Sargent, Bacon, Guston, Rauschenberg, Whitten, Lewis, Basquiat, Saville, Richter, Simpson, Odutola, etc. Race, gender, nationalism, and close looking anchor our exploration.

Scene Painting (DRA2168.01)

This class will introduce students to the fundamentals of scenic art, including terminology, commonly used tools and techniques. Students will learn to create processes that will guide them from a rendering or scenic finish to a completed project. Skills we will develop include color mixing, surface preparation for soft goods and hard scenery, translating small renderings to fully realized pieces, analyzing and reproducing organic textures and architectural details.

Visual Arts Lecture Series Seminar (VA4218.01)

This discussion-animated, readings-based seminar provides art historical, cultural, and critical contexts for the Visual Arts Lecture Series (VALS). In addition to our ongoing interrogation of the public lecture as such, students present their own work (in any field) and analyze the technical and stylistic aspects of structuring an effective and engaging ‘talk.’ The course provides unique opportunities for interaction with visiting artists, curators, critics, and historians. Consistent participation and a formal presentation of work/research is required, as are visits to local and regional museums and archives. Please note: Students taking the seminar will not need to register for, and will not receive separate credit for VALS. However, attendance at all VALS lectures is a requirement of the course.

Reading Marx (PHI4106.01)

Marx’s ideas remain an important source of political and social science thought. This class requires students to engage in a close and critical reading of a number of Marx’s essays and to assess his work in the light of critical philosophical responses.

Topics in Applied Philosophy: Privacy (PHI2126.01)

Privacy has long been regarded as important and yet claims to privacy have been frequently challenged and often overridden by political, economic, and technological considerations. Do we have a right to privacy? If so, what is its philosophical justification and what essential human goods and capacities does it protect? In what circumstances and for what reasons can we be asked to forfeit our privacy? This course examines these questions via a close reading of the philosophical literature.

Traces, Mistakes, and Leftovers (DRW4237.01)

The role of drawing has changed over the history of art, from primitive recording to preliminary sketch, from documentation to works that function independently. How can we expand these notions to include the remnants of the making process. Can the research done before a project, the many mistakes made in process, or the discards left after completion of an artwork be considered acts of drawing? What happens in the moments when we think we aren’t working? Can we analyze our interactions with the world that lead to a certain way of making things? What is the necessity or value of ruins?

In this course students collect, analyze, and employ the physical and conceptual detritus surrounding their making process. Topics include: idea generation and development, the use of memory, teaching and learning, and drawing as a way of thinking. In-class activities and discussions are complemented by readings, writings, and the production of an individual body of work, including an elaborate commonplace book. Students are expected to be engaged in a concurrent 4000 level studio/making course.

Mary Lum
M 1:40-5:20 (first seven weeks)
This course is categorized as All courses, Drawing.

The Jewish Annotated New Testament (APA2180.01)

Jesus, Paul, Peter, James, Jesus’ mother Mary and Mary Magdalene were all Jews even though they appear prominently in the Christian Bible, also known as the New Testament. Their lives were imbued with Jewish history, beliefs, and practices. Often those nuances and meanings are lost when those texts are read without that understanding. In this class we will read some of the Gospels through the lens of the Jewish world of which these texts came out of. Our text book will be, The Jewish Annotated New Testament, edited by Amy-Jill Levine and Marc Z. Brettler, who assembled the best Jewish scholars of our generation to write commentaries on the text. This class will explore the messages of the Gospels as well as unpack the Jewish culture from where they emerged from.

Bass Intensive (MIN4026.01)

Advanced studies in theory relating to performance.

Students must be enrolled in Bass with Bisio (MIN4417) simultaneously, no exceptions. This class is only for advanced students and by permission of instructor.

Patternmaking and Garment Construction (DRA4119.01)

This course is designed to teach the student the many steps involved in creating a finished garment from a simple idea, piece of research or sketch. Students will learn the basics of draping, flat patterning, and fitting. Construction of final garment will allow them to explore and employ sewing skills beyond the fundamentals.

Keats and Stevens (LIT2299.02)

This introductory seminar will consider and juxtapose the 19th century British Romantic poet John Keats and the 20th century American modernist poet Wallace Stevens, both of whom were rigorous craftsmen, provocative thinkers, and aesthetic theorists who argued fervently for the supremacy of the imagination, the interconnectedness of truth and beauty, and the importance of mystery and uncertainty in poetry. Alternating between Keats and Stevens, we will consider the poetry and critical prose of both writers and look for common threads, both in their writing and artistic sensibility. We will write two short critical essays and together engage in intensive close readings of each poet’s work.