Archives

Field Course in Coral Reef Biology (BIO4239.01)

Coral reefs are among the most diverse, unique and beautiful of ecosystems on the planet.  Alas, they are also quite vulnerable to various environmental assaults and most of the reefs on earth are in real jeopardy.  In order to gain a more robust understanding of reefs, we will study reefs on site in the Caribbean. Students will learn the taxonomy, identification and characteristics of the animals that live in coral reefs.  The course will take place on the island of Grand Cayman. Students will have an opportunity to become certified scuba divers and participate in ongoing research. Students will collect and analyze fish inventory data and submit those data to the environmental organization, REEF (Reef Environmental Education Foundation).  Students will be able to compare their data with prior research. We will also discuss reef ecology with Tim Austin a research scientists with the Cayman Islands Department of the Environment. We will also participate in a beach clean-up activity.

This course will be offered over FWT (Jan. 4-11, 2020). Credits earned will count towards the credit requirements for Spring 2020. Registered students will receive a partial waiver for the number of hours normally required during FWT. 

Additional costs will be associated with this course.

Animal Social Behavior (BIO4307.01)

E. O. Wilson has said that “the organism is simply DNA’s way of making more DNA”. Are the elaborate, bizarre, (at times flamboyant), energy requiring social systems of animals simply adaptations which permit those animals to reproduce? Why is there so much diversity among animal social systems? Why are most mammals polygynous and most birds monogamous? Can we make predictions about successful social strategies and test them in the field? Can we gain insight into human evolution by studying the social systems of non-human primates?

In this course we will consider the evolution and adaptedness of different social systems with particular attention to current models of the evolution of altruistic behavior. We will read and discuss current research from a variety of journals (topics include: cooperative breeding, parent-offspring conflict, siblicide, mate choice and sexual selection, sex ratios, hymenoptera social organization, evolution of primate mating systems, the significance of infanticide and maternal rank). Students will undertake their own research projects.

Comparative Animal Physiology (with lab) (BIO4201.01)

A rigorous course in which physiological processes of vertebrates and invertebrates are studied at the cellular, organ, organ system, and whole animal levels of organization. The unifying themes of the course are the phenomenon of homeostasis (whereby an animal maintains its organization in the face of environmental perturbations) and the relationship between structure and function. The student will examine these phenomena in the laboratory by dissection and physiological experimentation. Topics include digestion and nutrition, metabolism, gas exchange, circulation, excretion, and neurophysiology.

Betsy Sherman
M/Th 10:00-11:50; T 2:10-5:00 (Lab)
This course is categorized as All courses, Biology.

Chromophilia: Explorations in Color (VA4215.01)

Chromophilia, a term coined by contemporary artist David Batchelor, refers to intense passion and love for color. What is it about color that has the power to induce reverie, and conversely to manipulate, or disgust? How do we understand and respond to color from phenomenological, poetic, philosophical, and societal vantage points? How as artists can we become the master of our passionately-loved and yet ever-shifting chroma?

In this class, we look carefully at and discuss the work of many artists and the implications of color in their images. Wide-ranging readings from literature, philosophy, and cultural criticism, serve as a base for discussion and artistic response.

Visual work for the first weeks of class consists of color problems using cut paper; in subsequent weeks, students solve problems presented in class with painting, or any other color-abled media. Reading and written responses are assigned weekly. Class time is primarily used for discussion of texts, critique of visual work, and student presentations of research. Assignments are given throughout, however, it is the objective of this class to provide the skills necessary for the student to confidently pursue self-designed projects. A high degree of motivation is expected.

The Novels of Kazuo Ishiguro (LIT4291.01)

In the inscription for Kazuo Ishiguro’s 2017 Nobel Prize for Literature, the committee announced it had chosen to give him the award because his novels had “uncovered the abyss beneath our illusory sense of connection with the world.” In this class, we will read nearly all of these novels, beginning with Ishiguro’s first, A Pale View of These Hills, and including An Artist of the Floating World, The Remains of the Day, When We Were Orphans, Never Let Me Go, and The Buried Giant, as well as his collection of stories, Nocturnes: Five Stories of Music and Nightfall. We will investigate Ishiguro’s constant reinvention of the novel, his approach to the confines of genre, and the ways in which Ishiguro has appropriated and subverted the notion of identity as subject. Throughout the term will also interrogate the ways in which Ishiguro has transformed the modern idea of the British novel, by analyzing his approach to race, gender identity, bio-ethics, and the long shadow of cultural memory. We will screen the film adaptations of his major work, and also consult his work as a screenwriter in The White Countess and The Saddest Music in the World. This is an advanced course intended for students with prior college-level coursework in literature.

Corequisites: Students are required to be in attendance at all Literature evenings and Poetry at Bennington events (most Wednesday evenings at 7:00pm).

Unhomely Thoughts from Abroad (SPA4605.01)

From Simón Bolívar’s recruitment of the exiled Francisco de Miranda in early nineteenth-century London, to the counter-revolutionary Guillermo Cabrera Infante’s Tres tristes tigres, written in a Hampstead flat, much of Latin America’s postcolonial identity has been forged outside its borders. Beyond defining home, exiles have defined their alternate environments. De Miranda’s statue still stands in Fitzroy Square, and Cabrera Infante lived in London for the rest of his life. Exile, whether a political necessity or voluntary, is more than a discursive conceit in this context, and language an act of memory.

The proposal is to study Latin America’s exilic thought, one of its most formative traditions, from Independence to the present. Students will debate their own perspectives, both in conversation and in writing, thus developing analytical and linguistic skills, and will undertake a short research project. The usual array of media will be included. Conducted in Spanish. High-intermediate level.

Corequisites: Language Series

In Sickness and In Health: An Introduction to Medical Anthropology (ANT4149.01)

In this course we will explore the social dimensions of medicine, the body, illness, health, healing, medical care and biotechnologies across societies and times from comparative, cross-cultural, ethnographic perspectives. We will examine the role of cultural differences in defining and dealing with health and illness and investigate health related factors that link humanity cross-culturally through common needs. If human experiences and understandings of illness, suffering, and healing are not objectively rooted in universal facts of biology or nature, how are they to be analyzed and understood? If the interaction between biology and culture depends on the context, what is the status of biomedicine? Can/should the biomedical model simply be regarded as one system of belief and practice among others? And how is the biomedical model embedded in a socioeconomic hierarchy that unevenly distributes health and healthcare between haves and have nots? We will pursue these questions in a global framework, drawing on ethnographies and critical essays that open up the field of medical anthropology.

Fashion and Modernism (VA4129.01)

“Let There Be Fashion, Down With Art” –Max Ernst

The rise of capitalism and the Industrial Revolution led to radical shifts in politics and art in the late 19th century. Fashion acts as a powerful analogue to and forecaster of Modernism. Artists such as Henri Matisse, Leon Bakst, Sonia Delaunay and Salvador Dali took note of fashion’s nascent agency and created clothing as a means of engaging the new political, social and cultural landscapes of the 20th Century. Influenced by Charles Baudelaire’s radical questioning of beauty and fashion, artists attempted to define fashion’s role in culture, manipulating it to reflect their own proclivities. This course will introduce and reconsider various movements such as Cubism, Fauvism, Futurism, Constructivism, Dada, and Surrealism through the lens of fashion, investigating the various agendas and ideologies deployed. Students will create artworks that engage the political spectrum as it intersects with Modernism’s aesthetic partisanship, including the creation of original garments. While this is a studio course, there will be weekly reading assignments and discussion as well as critiques. Students may work in a variety of media, including painting, drawing, photography, sculpture, video, or costume design. A high degree of motivation is expected. 

Kiln Firing: the Art and the Science (CER4272.01)

In Kiln Firing students will be exploring the science and art of firing a kiln by first operating and understanding electric kilns, then gas kilns (both oxidation and reduction, manual and automatic), and lastly exploring atmospheric firing and alternative firing processes. Bisque firing, cone 04, 6, and 10, basic maintenance and repair, loading and unloading bisque and glaze firings, and crystobalite formation and quartz inversion will all be investigated. This course will be largely self-directed building upon a basic foundation of knowledge with topics from each student’s specific interests. Some possible subjects for exploration are once, soda and/or salt, saggar, raku, pit, and wood firing, reduction for shinos and copper reds, developing microcrystals, firing for crystalline glazes, and reduction cooling among other possibilities. These objectives will be facilitated through demonstration and hands-on practice. The overarching goal of this class is to empower students with the technical knowledge to express themselves through ceramics coherently using a comprehensive understanding of the firing process. Firing is often an intimidating procedure for even the most advanced ceramic student, this class is designed to build each student’s confidence and comfort through full involvement in the firing process.

Some basic tools will be required.

Intermediate Painting: Facture (PAI4106.01)

“Facture refers to the manner in which a painting, drawing, or object is made. It is the combination of brushstrokes, marks, material, and the texture of the surface. Facture is critical to the success of any object. Much of the fascination that accrues to all manual media comes from what can be observed at close range. That distance reveals the foundation, the touch, the sensuality, and the understanding of the material that gives art objects their essential character.” -Kit White, 101 Things to Learn in Art School

Behind the impulse to put paint on canvas is a search for meaning. As an artwork comes into being, its meaning(s) evolve concurrently. Concentrating on the establishment of a rigorous artistic practice, this course will focus on the relationship between facture and meaning in painting. Sharpening practical and critical skills, assignments will investigate the processes and methods of painting from practical and theoretical perspectives. Questions to be considered might include: How does the painter’s knowledge of craft inform the way they paint? Is technique knowledge or behavior? What is the role of labor? Readings, critiques and studio projects will serve to create a constructive and lively dialogue in the classroom.

Violin/Viola (MIN4345.01)

Studies in all left-hand position and shifting and an exploration of various bow techniques. Students can select from the concerto, sonata repertoire, short pieces and etudes for the study designed to develop technique, advanced musicianship and prepare for the performance.

Corequisites: Must participate and perform at least twice in Music Workshop (Tu. 6:30pm – 8:00pm)

Intermediate Violin/Viola (MIN4232.01)

Basic techniques will include the reading music in treble and /or alto cleft in basic keys. Hand position including left-hand sifting and fingering will be shown, and a rudimentary facility with the bow will be developed in order for students to participate in simple ensemble performances by the end of the term.

Corequisites: must participate and perform at least twice in Music Workshop (Tu. 6:30pm ~8pm)

Senior Projects (MPF4226.01)

This course will serve as a forum for technical planning and feedback for seniors scheduling a musical show or installation in Spring 2020. The majority of work for any senior show will be expected to be composed and/or collected by the beginning of the term. Students will be required to pick an advisor from appropriate music faculty to advise their particular projects as they develop. The course will introduce students to the challenges of sound design, drama, and visuals within a multi-disciplinary college community, and in creating successful collaborations, rehearsals, and techs.

Dancer as Maker (DAN4149.01)

Dancers working presently in the contemporary, experimental dance world do so in relation to the historical definitions of “the dancer,” all while deconstructing and recontextualizing its meaning. Dancers are makers in their own right inside choreographic structures. In this course, we will work with specific choreographic structures and scores, and use them as a frame to help understand how we participate in the process of making.  We will look at the choices we make as we help shape the choreography and performance. We will look at how we, as whole people, interact with the material. We will work with approaches to employing technical skill and elements such as movement quality and relationship to space, exploring our personal agency and presence.  As a final project we will study the efforts of a few dancers working presently in the contemporary experimental dance realm with major choreographers. We will be learning their choreographed material and also charting their perceived methods for engaging in and performing the work. We will be asking questions like: What was their training model? What influenced their work? How did they integrate themselves into the whole concept?

Theory of Impressionism (MTH4112.01)

This seminar will look at works by Claude Debussy and Maurice Ravel, as well as by Erik Satie, Les Six, Fauré, and diverse U.S. composers at the turn of the 20th century. We will start by looking at Debussy’s Preludes as a microcosm of his harmonic style, and then analyze major orchestral works. Ravel’s Tombeau de Couperin, String Quartet, and select songs will also be analyzed. Students will be expected to write analyses of short works, and to contextualize the innovations of Debussy and Ravel within the complex literary and visual styles of fin-de-siècle France. This course will have special assignments for those who wish to explore advanced harmonic analyses of these works. Students must be able to read notation fluently.

Piano Lab II (MIN4236.01)

The goals of this course are to gain ease and dexterity at the keyboard, developing a confident piano technique and the skill of reading musical notation. Students will expand upon the skills learned in Piano lab I, adding to a basic repertoire of scales and chords, use them in improvisation and harmonization of melodies. In addition they will explore a repertoire that utilizes the musical components covered and learn to perform selected compositions.

Piano (MIN4333.02, section 2)

Individual private lessons for advanced students. Audition required. Weekly meetings times on scheduled class days arranged with the instructor. Participation in music workshop and end-of-term recital required.

Corequisites: Must participate in Music Workshop (Tuesday, 6:30 – 8pm).

Piano (MIN4333.01, section 1)

Individual private lessons for advanced students. Audition required. Weekly meetings times on scheduled class days arranged with the instructor. Participation in music workshop and end-of-term recital required.

Corequisites: Must participate in Music Workshop (Tuesday, 6:30 – 8pm).

Piano (MIN4333.03, section 3)

Individual private lessons for advanced students. Audition required. Weekly meetings times on scheduled class days arranged with the instructor. Participation in music workshop and end-of-term recital required.

Corequisites: Must participate in Music Workshop (Tuesday, 6:30 – 8pm).

Cup Lending Library (CER4108.01)

All art is a form of communication. The ceramic cup is unusual in that it communicates, perhaps best, through touch. The Cup Lending Library is designed to facilitate this kind of communication on our campus. In this course, students will curate and make cups for a Cup Lending Library to be permanently installed in Crossett Library. The Cup Lending Library will act as an introduction to ceramic artists, handmade cups, and will provide cups for use on campus for community events or personal use. The cups in this library collection will include cups curated from national artists and the best examples of Bennington student work. Over the course of the term, students will refine and remake their cups while researching historical and contemporary examples. Early in the class, we will investigate non-traditional collections and lending in libraries. Students will work together to formulate a plan for curating cups including selection criteria, quantity, and budget. Students will conduct research into the artists represented in the collection and this will be compiled into a written document that will accompany each piece. At the end of the term, students will determine the best way to introduce the campus community to this collection. The course will consist of 2, 2-hour sessions with the first being a lecture/ seminar class in the library followed by a hands-on class in the ceramics studio.

Shorter Songs (MTH4110.01)

What elements set certain composers apart from their contemporaries? In any genre, there are those who “raise the bar” and gain respect both for being prolific and breaking traditions of harmony and form. Jazz saxophonist Wayne Shorter took his cue from ground-breaking composers before him such as Duke Ellington and Thelonius Monk, helping to create new directions in jazz while being a member of the bands Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers, Miles Davis Quintet and Weather Report in the 1960s and 1970s. We will examine many of the songs written for these groups, as well as those written for his many albums as a leader (for Blue Note Records), looking at his unique way of combining melody, harmony and rhythm. Students will also be encouraged to compose and arrange “short” songs, using some of the techniques learned. Compositions will be performed in Music Workshop.

Jazz Piano Lab (MIN4335.01)

This course will utilize Bennington’s Piano Lab to explore and develop the skills and knowledge required to effectively play non-classical piano repertoire. Styles covered are: blues, reggae, salsa, bossa-nova and jazz. Students will take turns learning and playing bass lines, chord voicings, stylistic rhythms, melodies and improvised solos.

Corequisites: Must participate in Music Workshop (Tuesday, 6:30 – 8pm).

Jazz Piano (MIN4240.01)

Weekly private instruction in jazz piano to be arranged with instructor. Explore and develop skills and knowledge required to effectively play non-classical piano repertoire. Styles covered: blues, reggae, salsa, bossa-nova and jazz. Create bass lines, chord voicings, stylistic rhythms, melodies and improvised solos.

Clarinet (MIN4223.01)

Study of clarinet technique and repertoire with an emphasis on tone production, dexterity, reading skills, and improvisation. This course is for intermediate-advanced students only.

Corequisites: Students will be requested to show work during the term at Music Workshop (Tuesday, 6:30 – 8 pm).

Saxophone (MIN4237.01)

Study of saxophone technique and standard repertoire (jazz or classical), with an emphasis on tone production, dexterity, reading skills, and improvisation. This course is for intermediate-advanced students only.

Corequisite: Must participate in Music Workshop (T 6:30pm-8:00pm)

Intermediate Voice (MVO4301.04, section 4)

For students of varying levels of singing ability. Vocal production and physiology will be discussed. Group warm-ups and vocalizations will incorporate exercises to develop breath control, resonance, projection, range, color, and agility. The fundamental concepts of singing will be explored in the preparation of specific song assignments. Personalization of text and emotional expression will be addressed. Students will study and perform traditional classical song literature (including early Italian songs, 17-18th century arias and repertoire in several languages) to strengthen and to facilitate technical growth before moving on to other contemporary styles. Students will have half-hour repertory sessions every other week with an accompanist. Students must have previous voice experience and/or study, and some music literacy.

Corequisites: Attendance and participation in Music Workshop Tuesday 6:30-8PM

Intermediate Voice (MVO4301.03, section 3)

For students of varying levels of singing ability. Vocal production and physiology will be discussed. Group warm-ups and vocalizations will incorporate exercises to develop breath control, resonance, projection, range, color, and agility. The fundamental concepts of singing will be explored in the preparation of specific song assignments. Personalization of text and emotional expression will be addressed. Students will study and perform traditional classical song literature (including early Italian songs, 17-18th century arias and repertoire in several languages) to strengthen and to facilitate technical growth before moving on to other contemporary styles. Students will have half-hour repertory sessions every other week with an accompanist. Students must have previous voice experience and/or study, and some music literacy.

Corequisites: Attendance and participation in Music Workshop Tuesday 6:30-8PM

Intermediate Voice (MVO4301.02, section 2)

For students of varying levels of singing ability. Vocal production and physiology will be discussed. Group warm-ups and vocalizations will incorporate exercises to develop breath control, resonance, projection, range, color, and agility. The fundamental concepts of singing will be explored in the preparation of specific song assignments. Personalization of text and emotional expression will be addressed. Students will study and perform traditional classical song literature (including early Italian songs, 17-18th century arias and repertoire in several languages) to strengthen and to facilitate technical growth before moving on to other contemporary styles. Students will have half-hour repertory sessions every other week with an accompanist. Students must have previous voice experience and/or study, and some music literacy.

Corequisites: Attendance and participation in Music Workshop Tuesday 6:30-8PM

Intermediate Voice (MVO4301.01, section 1)

For students of varying levels of singing ability. Vocal production and physiology will be discussed. Group warm-ups and vocalizations will incorporate exercises to develop breath control, resonance, projection, range, color, and agility. The fundamental concepts of singing will be explored in the preparation of specific song assignments. Personalization of text and emotional expression will be addressed. Students will study and perform traditional classical song literature (including early Italian songs, 17-18th century arias and repertoire in several languages) to strengthen and to facilitate technical growth before moving on to other contemporary styles. Students will have half-hour repertory sessions every other week with an accompanist. Students must have previous voice experience and/or study, and some music literacy.

Corequisites: Attendance and participation in Music Workshop Tuesday 6:30-8PM

 

Thomas Bogdan
Tu 10:30-12:20
This course is categorized as All courses, Voice.

Movement Practice: Advanced Dance Technique (DAN4344.01)

This advanced level movement practice is designed for students with prior experience in dance technique. In this class, we will hone in on the importance of balancing controlled and spontaneous action as well as internal and external movement through using a series of improvisational and compositional practices. We will be learning longer and complex movement phrases that are structured with principles from Water Body Movement (“Body is a container filled with water. Movements are a flow of the water.”) Bringing conscious thought and heightened awareness to both interior and exterior spaces, we deepen our understanding about the unity of our body/mind and how it functions as a whole. We aim to maximize each student’s performance skills and cultivate personal ways to understand how to use one’s own body.

Balkan Ensemble (MPF4204.01)

Balkan music is fierce brass, complex harmonies, and mind-bending asymmetrical dances. It is spirited Serbian wedding music, dissonant village songs, devastating Bosnian love ballads, saucy songs of the Greek underworld, and heart-pounding Turkish rhythms. In the Bennington Balkan Ensemble, we will learn to perform a variety of traditional, urban, village, and popular music from Southeast Europe. Singing and playing indigenous, orchestral, and electronic instruments, we’ll explore repertoire from Albania, Greece, Bosnia, Hungary, Bulgaria, Croatia, Kosova, Turkey, Macedonia, Romania, and Serbia. Student, faculty and staff singers and instrumentalists of all types (strings, percussion, woodwinds, brass, etc.) are welcome in this ensemble.  Be prepared to sing, play, improvise, and dance.  Audition and instructor approval required.

Corequisites: Participation and performance at Music Workshop T 6:30-8:00

Reading and Writing: Poetry of Trauma and Violence (LIT4290.01)

Students will read various poetry collections that deal with different forms of trauma: homophobia, lynching, war, sexual abuse, colonization, and the overall idea of how to define “violence.” There will be time to discuss prosodic interests of our poets as well as discuss how content and form work together to create a seamless work. We will then turn to our own work and analyze the how and why of our choices. As trauma is our backdrop, students are expected to come to class prepared to speak with maturity and open-mindedness about many uncomfortable topics. Though student work does not have to explore the theme of the class, I do encourage students to take risks in their own poetry and critical analyses.

Students will read an average of one collection of poetry a week, write a weekly poem, write several critical response papers using Maggie Nelson’s text The Art of Cruelty to interpret how violence operates in the poetry collections read, and prepare a final portfolio of poems and self-reflections of one’s own work as it relates to the critical essays found in The Art of Cruelty.

Corequisites: Students are required to attend all Literature Evenings and Poetry at Bennington events (typically held on Wednesdays at 7:00pm).

Bennington Plays: Playwrights (DRA4163.01)

This project-based class is for playwrights engaged in the process and techniques of rewriting and staging their plays. The majority of rewrites may happen prior to the semester, but substantial rewrites could emerge as essential during the production period. Collaborating with the director, actors, and designers will be the heart of this class.

Playwrights are expected to also serve as collective support for the other playwrights whose plays are being produced. In addition to the 4 plays receiving production, up to 6 other plays will receive staged readings as part of the festival.

We will meet as a group at least once a week, on Monday night, with the other nights designated for individual rehearsals. Playwrights will attend Production Meetings and outside Design meetings. Rehearsals culminate in public performances of multiple works staged in workshop productions supported by minimal design. Playwrights will also write a post-performance reflective essay.

Sherry Kramer
M/T/W/Th/F 7:00-10:00 (with some weekend rehearsals)
This course is categorized as All courses, Drama.

Paris on Screen: Tradition and Modernity (FRE4498.01)

In this intermediate-low level course, we will study the representation of the city of Paris on film in order to examine modernityʹs challenges to tradition. In particular, we will focus on the question of how urban communities and city dwellers react to increasing disconnectedness, anonymity, and solitude. Films may include Tanguy, La Haine, Chacun cherche son chat, Paris, Playtime, Monsieur Ibrahim, and Paris, je tʹaime. Class discussions, activities, written assignments, and oral presentations will allow students to improve their linguistic proficiency and analytical skills. Conducted in French. Intermediate‐low level.

Corequisites: Language Series

Stephen Shapiro
M/Th 10:00-11:50
This course is categorized as All courses, French.

Insider Perspectives on the Francophone World II (FRE4224.01)

Viewed from the outside, the French‐speaking world offers enticing images of beauty, pleasure, and freedom. From the inside, however, it is a complicated, often contradictory world where implicit codes and values shape the most basic aspects of daily life. This course will give you an insiderʹs perspective on a cultural and communicative system whose ideas, customs, and belief systems are surprisingly different from your own. Together, we will examine how daily life and activities (friendship and family relationships, housing, leisure, work, and food culture) reflect culturally specific ideologies and values. Emphasis will be placed on developing ease, fluency, and sophistication in oral and written expression. Class will be conducted in French and revolve around authentic materials from the Francophone world (video, music, advertisements, literary texts). Conducted in French.

Corequisites: Language Series

Avant-Garde Art in China (CHI4507.01)

Art is always somehow a reflection of the culture and society in which it is produced. In this class we will explore the ways in which contemporary (post-Mao) Chinese art reflects on modern Chinese culture and society. Each class or every other class, students will be given a packet with visual and written information on a particular work of art with a vocabulary list and grammar points for that material. Documentaries will also be used as a source of authentic input. Students will be expected to prepare to discuss the material in Chinese with the teacher and classmates during the next class meeting.

Corequisites: Language Series

Confucianism vs. Daoism (CHI4402.01)

The Twenty-four Stories of Filial Piety are well known Chinese stories that exemplify the devotion of children to their parents that is the chief virtue in Confucianism. The Daoist Tales of Zhuangzi, on the other hand, offer a much different set of values. These tales “translated” from classical Chinese into modern Mandarin at the student’s language level will serve as a starting point for an exploration into two complementary and competing schools of thought that have shaped the character and culture of the Chinese. Students will learn basic vocabulary and grammar through a four-skills approach while comparing and contrasting the basic concepts of these two important Chinese philosophies.

All students will meet in small groups once a week with the teacher outside of the regular classes.

Corequisites: Language Series

Contemporary Chinese Poetry (CHI4216.01)

While the language of classical Chinese poetry is practically inaccessible to even today’s native speakers of Chinese, the poetry of the five contemporary poets studied in this course is written in the vernacular and serves as a rich source of authentic texts for this course, which integrates language learning with poetry study. The five poets, all born after 1980, each offers a unique perspective into the changing society and culture of modern China. Each lesson or two, students will receive a packet with poems and information on the poet along with a vocabulary list, and grammar worksheets. Through reading and discussing these poets as well as writing their own poems in Chinese, students will gain insights into the changing culture of modern China, while building on their competencies in listening, speaking, reading and writing. Mandarin Chinese.

Corequisites: Language Series

Comics/Culture (SPA4401.01)

What are comics? Why study them? What do they have to do with Spanish culture? Students in this course will consider the theoretical and artistic concerns for graphic narratives, especially in the interaction between text and image. We will examine the gradual evolution of the so-called historieta from its historical relegation to the realm of the juvenile and lowbrow, to the more recent boom in the academic and critical legitimacy of graphic novels. Our exploration will encompass comic strips, cartoons, and graphic novels from Spain, critical analyses, articles about the art form, as well as films and works of literature inspired by comics. Throughout, we will investigate what these media expose about, and how they simultaneously influence, the cultures from which they emerge. The focus of the course will be on student-generated discussion and critical thinking about these media, but continual practice in all four major areas of language (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) will be essential. Students will learn to defend their own ideas in spoken and written language. We will explore grammatical and linguistic questions as they arise naturally in the classroom. Conducted in Spanish. Co-requisite: attendance at 2 language events. Intermediate-low level.

Corequisites: Language Series

Language Through Film (SPA4223.01)

Students in this course will continue to learn the Spanish language through an examination of films. While there will be some necessary discussion about cinematographic components, the focus of discussion will be on historical and political moments present in the films. A consideration, for instance, of national and regional identity, political violence, border crossing, intolerance, and gender identity, will drive the student-generated conversation. The course will also provide specific and explicit support for the linguistic development necessary to communicate in increasingly complex ways, in both written and oral Spanish. Co-requisite: attendance at 2 language events. Conducted in Spanish. Introductory level.

Corequisites: Language Series

Architectural Analysis (ARC4157.01)

Students will select a critically significant building from the history of architecture. After careful research and documentation, a detailed analysis will be made, resulting in critical drawings, diagrams and both physical and digital models. A final project will then be formulated for a new project, generated from the discoveries that emerged through the analysis.

Sage City Symphony (MPF4100.01)

Sage City Symphony is a community orchestra which invites student participation. The Symphony is noted for the policy of commissioning new works by major composers, in some instances student composers, as well as playing the classics. There are openings in the string sections, and occasionally by audition for solo winds and percussion. There will be two concerts each term.

Analyzing the Social Issues in Japan Through Online News (JPN4601.01)

The course is designed for students to deepen their understanding of Japanese language and culture through analysis of Japanese online newspapers and examination of Japanese news articles from various contexts. Students will practice various reading strategies, which will help them become independent learners. Mass media is the reflection of a society and the mirror of a culture. Therefore, reading Japanese newspaper helps students to become more aware of the Japanese culture, which is reflected in newspaper articles. Students are required not only to conduct research in their fields of interest, such as politics, economics, and films, but also to create newspaper articles for local Japanese people. High-Intermediate Level. Conducted in Japanese.

Corequisites: Language Series

Projection_Mapping_Design (MA4106.01)

The class will be concerned with investigating the interaction of projected imagery with an actor/performer/viewer.

Investigation will center on how projections can be integrated into, and bring further information to a location, a set and or a text. Various examples will be looked at and researched.

Two plays or texts will be used as a basis for two projects and for each, projections will be designed, and tested including different locations and on different surfaces.

The images can be created in a number of programs, with the content and how this works with the locations will be the main focus. Instruction on Qab and Madmapper will be included and used for the tests along with other software.

Advanced Butoh Practice-Body as Landscape (DAN4139.01)

This course is designed for students with prior experience in dance technique or movement practice. By using a series of somatic, improvisational and compositional practices inspired by butoh, we will develop ways of embodying unorthodox and complex ideas dealing with the ever-becoming, inconsumable, and vaporizing body. Students will be encouraged to closely observe and keep their awareness open toward what is occurring in both outer and inner landscapes, aiming at composing new relationships between them. In this way, we work to maximize our perceptions and to control the subtle energy and expression of each body part.

Advanced Voice (MVO4401.01)

Advanced study of vocal technique and the interpretation of the vocal repertoire, designed for advanced students who have music as a plan concentration and to assist graduating seniors with preparation for senior recitals. Students are required to study and to perform a varied spectrum of vocal repertory for performance and as preparation for further study or graduate school. A class maximum of five voice students will meet for one-hour individual session/coachings with the instructor each week (to be scheduled with the instructor). Students will also have an individual half-hour session with a pianist each week to work on repertory.

Corequisites: Participation and performance in Music Workshop Tuesday 6:30-8PM

Improvisation Ensemble for Musicians and Dancers (MPF4233.01)

This advanced course focuses on work in the performance of improvisation. For dancers, special attention is given to the development of individual movement vocabularies, physical contact and interaction, and the exploration of forms and structures.

For musicians, special attention is given to creating rhythms and sonorities which can then be manipulated and developed while interacting with dancers in the moment.

Dancers are expected to have experience with improvisation in performance and are asked to develop a structure for the group. Musicians should have basic skills on their instrument and be able create and convey a sense of form to other musicians in an efficient way.

Both dancers and musicians will meet together on Thursdays.

Physics II: Electricity and Magnetism (with lab) (PHY4327.01)

How does influence travel from one thing to another? In Newton’s mechanics of particles and forces, influences travel instantaneously across arbitrarily far distances. Newton himself felt this to be incorrect, but he did not suggest a solution to this problem of “action at a distance.” To solve this problem, we need a richer ontology: The world is made not only of particles, but also of fields. As examples of the field concept, we study the theory and applications of the electric field and the magnetic field. Students will learn how fields are generated, how fields interact with matter and with each other, and how these interactions inform our understanding the world.

Hugh Crowl
M/Th 10:00-11:50 & W 8:30-12:10 (Lab)
This course is categorized as All courses, Physics.

Discrimination and Audit Studies (SOC4105.01)

In the first half of term, we will examine various definitions of discrimination, and methods of measuring discrimination, identifying advantages and pitfalls of each. We will read studies examining discrimination on the basis of race, ethnicity, social class, gender, sexual orientation, and criminal record. Students will research the ways in which Supreme Court cases have contributed to legal and sociological conceptualizations of discrimination. In the second half of the course, students will work in pairs or small groups to design and implement an email-based experimental audit study measuring a form of discrimination of their choice. Each pair or group will produce a final research paper, modeled after an academic journal article, in which they will detail the findings of their audit study and contextualize these within the relevant literature. Students will deliver their papers in the form of professional conference-style presentations at the end of term. Prior coursework in research methods and/or social statistics is highly recommended for this class.

Topics In Video: Experimental Documentary (FV4236.01)

This course explores documentary possibilities through screenings and video projects. The class will look at and consider non-fiction techniques from early cinema verite films to recent attempts to address point of view and outsider status in documentary and experimental video work. In collaborative and individual projects, the class will take a hands-on approach to documentary production: addressing interview techniques, cinematography, story structures, metaphor, archival film use and a range of editing and presentation techniques – including installations. We will also work on our ability to develop relationships and to gain access to subjects outside our usual circles.

Sustainability and Social Justice (POL4256.02)

This course will explore how different social movements have incorporated principles of ecological sustainability and social justice into their activism. We will examine how environmentalists (mainstream and radical), indigenous rights activists, feminists, immigrants’ rights activists, anti-immigrant groups, religious organizations, conservatives and labor unions
have conceptualized and fought for sustainability. We will then critically reflect on the similarities and differences between these various attempts to articulate connections between the ecological and the social. By the end of the course, you will have a strong understanding of the opportunities and barriers that exist in efforts to build the alliances necessary for the
(re)construction of societies that are both ecologically sustainable and socially just.

I am a Material (SCU4112.02)

What is a more valuable piece of matter? Could it be something that will degrade in this art world and be okay? String, cotton-balls and rubber bands may be what should be affixed to your unique prosthetic to complete a task given.

This course will cover information and techniques related to body casting, wire rope rigging, fabricating, building processes and encourage personal material resourcing. This is a project based performance course in which you will have problems set to define and complete. Your found solution will be evaluated on how thoroughly you analyzed the task, by way of experimentation of intent represented in prototyping and drawings, as well as showing a final function.

Delights of Ephemera (VA4128.01)

This course invites students to consider the pleasure and significance of ephemera—cards, posters, invitations, and other written or printed materials—in the context of art exhibitions and events. Readings, lectures and field trips cover topics including traditional and experimental forms of ephemera; the collection of ephemera; and the function of ephemera as historical document and work of art. With an eye on conceptual and formal relationships between the ephemeral product and the event it represents, students during the term will design three pieces of ephemera responding to an exhibition from history; an exhibition in Usdan Gallery; and a proposed exhibition of works from their own practice.

Bennington Review: A Practicum in Literary Publishing and Editing-Poetry (LIT4330.02, section 2)

This two-credit course involves working on selecting and editing the content of Bennington’s recently relaunched national print literary magazine, Bennington Review. Students will serve as Editorial Assistants for the magazine, studying and practicing all aspects of magazine editing. The course will also engage students in discussions of contemporary print and digital literary culture, and of the history of literary magazines. Students will be selected in part based on their familiarity with contemporary literature, as well as for prior experience in editing or publishing. Students should anticipate plenty of work for two credits, as well as an immersive, hands-on, professional experience.

Corequisite: Students will be required to attend all Wednesday Literature Evenings and Poetry at Bennington events.

Bennington Review: A Practicum in Literary Editing and Publishing-Prose (LIT4330.01, section 1)

This two-credit course involves working on selecting and editing the content of Bennington’s recently relaunched national print literary magazine, Bennington Review. Students will serve as Editorial Assistants for the magazine, studying and practicing all aspects of magazine editing. The course will also engage students in discussions of contemporary print and digital literary culture, and of the history of literary magazines. Students will be selected in part based on their familiarity with contemporary literature, as well as for prior experience in editing or publishing. Students should anticipate plenty of work for two credits, as well as an immersive, hands-on, professional experience.

Reading & Writing Fiction: Plot and Suspense (LIT4144.01)

What is plot? What are stakes and how are they raised and can a story or a novel still compel a reader with small or smaller stakes? What is dramatic tension and what are the other ways a writer can build tension into a short story or a chapter? What, in other words, keeps a reader turning pages through a story or a novel and what happens when these same tools are applied to literary fiction? We’ll explore these questions and other questions of plot and plotting while reading fiction from ZZ Packer, Sally Rooney, Maggie Shipstead, Patricia Highsmith, Donna Tart, Andrea Lawlor, George Saunders, Patrick DeWitt, Jim Shepard, among others. The course will consist of close readings of published work alongside workshop of student submitted work.

Corequisites: Enrolled students are required to attend Wednesday night Bennington literary events.

Reading and Writing: Hybrid-Genre Works (LIT4140.01)

We will read and discuss an array of hybrid-genre works or writing that combines and coalesces two or more genres: poetry, fiction, criticism, and/or memoir. Some books will also cross media incorporating painting, photography, and film. Reading works by Shane McCrae, Rosa Alcalá, Elizabeth Powell, Dora Malech, Tan Lin, Jena Osman, Bhanu Kapil, and others, we will consider how drawing upon different prose, verse, and multi-media modes can complement and augment the way we shape our personal and political stories. Students will complete writing assignments each week designed to build toward a hybrid-genre work. Students will also give and receive critique in a workshop environment, expand approaches to drafting, and revise writing for the final assignment.

Co-requisite: Students are required to attend the Literature Evenings and Poetry at Bennington readings, typically held on Wednesdays at 7:00 p.m.

Reading and Writing Literary Journalism (LIT4141.01)

With the practice of journalism undergoing its most profound changes since the invention of the television, this course will steep students in the traditions of criticism, literary non-fiction, reporting and cultural journalism that thrived during the golden age of print and have persisted in the Internet era. We’ll work our way through literary criticism from Robert Boswell to Virginia Woolf and from Lionel Trilling to Zadie Smith; we’ll trace how notions of authority in cultural journalism changed from the objective to the subjective and how the New Journalism of the 1960s and 1970s combined facts and research with creative sensibility and author’s voice. Students will discover for themselves through frequent writing assignments and workshops just how porous the boundaries are between traditional reporting, reviewing, profile writing, and more experimental forms like lyric essay. We’ll also listen closely to some of the most influential and innovative podcasts to create an anatomy of their appeal. Expect to read a whole host of literary journalists past and present including George Orwell, Rebecca West, Pauline Kael, Tete-Michel Kpomassie, Janet Malcolm, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Katherine Boo, Alex Tizou, Jia Tolentino, Alex Madrigal.

Corequisites: Students in this class are required to attend Literature evenings on Wednesday nights, including Poetry at Bennington events. All students may apply for multiple 4000-level Reading and Writing Courses in the same term, but, once accepted, may only enroll in one 4000-level Reading and Writing course per term.

Digital Materiality (MS4101.01)

“The cloud” is not in the sky, but is comprised of thousands of securitized data centers and fiber optic networks that span continents. Undersea cables still carry nearly all internet traffic that travels across oceans. How can we critically analyze these massive systems that are often either invisible or too large to see all at once? This course will explore the materiality of digital media and their infrastructures. We will read key works in media history, media archaeology, and related fields to trace the life cycle of digital devices, from mineral extraction and industrial production to the carbon footprint of consumer usage and digital technology’s afterlife as e-waste. As we delve into the prehistories and possible futures of digital technology, we will also consider the work of designers, engineers, and artists who help us think creatively about digital media, whether from the perspective of deep-time, or in speculations on post-digital media and data.

Movement Practice: Intermediate Dance Technique (DAN4236.01)

In this intermediate level course, we will focus on tapping into the subtle connections in the body. We will be using improvisational scores and somatic exercises to hone these connections and increase self-awareness. Gentle focus can be used to achieve high intensity movement. Tracking what we are doing as we do it–we will acknowledge the nervous system’s role in our movement efforts. It is important that we are able to do this with a non-judgmental mindset.  We will learn to watch openly, gathering information from others, to increase possibilities in performance.

Music Composition Intensive (MCO4695.01)

Students who wish to study composing intensively may be eligible for a small group tutorial or where appropriate, individual lessons. In general, students taking this course are expected to compose in longer forms and with more varied instrumentation than previously attempted. This course may be taken at the intermediate or advanced level.

Prerequisites: Previous composition and theory courses. Permission of the instructor.

Chemistry 2 (CHE4212.01)

Building on structural and reactivity insights developed in Chemistry 1, this course delves into molecular structure and modern theories of bonding, especially as they relate to the reaction patterns of functional groups. We will focus on the mechanisms of reaction pathways and develop an understanding for how those mechanisms are experimentally explored. There will be numerous readings from the primary literature, including some classic papers that describe seminal experiments. Particular attention will be paid to addition, elimination, and substitution reactions of organic compounds.

Corequisites: Lab

Biochemistry (CHE4335.01)

Biochemistry is an intermediate chemistry course in which students apply principles from general and organic chemistry, as well as general biology, to understand the molecular processes that characterize life. Biochemistry is a broad discipline that is growing rapidly in its scope – new developments and discoveries are being made daily. The goal of this class will be to give students a solid background with which they can appreciate the latest developments and research reports. We will begin with fundamental principles, but quickly move into a detailed look at metabolism – the specific means by which organisms use chemical energy to drive cell functions and how they convert simple molecules to complex biological molecules. This approach will provide a context to illustrate many of the core ideas we will cover. Students will also have the opportunity for independent work which will allow them to apply these ideas to topics of their own specific interests. Students will have weekly review assignments and at least two independent projects, including an oral presentation of a final project.

Strategies for Sustainability (DAN4143.01)

We have consistently seen that artists are lacking certain skill sets, tools and resources that would empower and strengthen their ability to create work, develop personal stability and envision longevity in a realistic way. How can we approach these issues in a holistic way that addresses the person and well as the artist? This course covers a range of topics that addresses the ability to create a quality of life, share access to resources, and redefine concepts of success. This class is open to artists in all artistic disciplines.

Covered topics include:
Healthcare
Financial Literacy
Housing | Homeownership
Artist Statements | Mission
Fundraising | Grant writing | Residencies
Personal Wellness
Time Management
Conflict Resolution
Principles for building a sustainable life
Artist Advocacy
Developing and sharing strategies and models

Advanced Projects in Dance (DAN4795.01)

This is an essential course for students involved in making work for performance this term. Attention is given to all of the elements involved in composition and production, including collaborative aspects. Students are expected to show their work throughout stages of development, complete their projects, and perform them to the public by the end of the term. Dance Workshop is required.

Corequisites: Dance Workshop attendance

Bennington Plays: Design (DRA4129.01)

This project-based class is for designers developing and implementing scenic, lighting, or costume designs for productions of new student written plays. Teams of directors and designers will work with other students in corresponding courses for playwrights, directors and actors, who are participating in the Bennington Plays Festival.

In a laboratory atmosphere, we will collaboratively develop an overall design approach for the festival, as well as specific designs for each play (either individually or collectively). Richard MacPike (Technical Instructor in Costume Production) will provide guidance and mentoring to costume designers. Particular attention will be placed on collaboration and communication between designers and directors, but also among and between all participants. Designers will meet once a week on Monday evenings and also attend drama production meetings on Mondays from 5:30-6:30 pm, through the performances in early to mid May. Students will also write a post-performance reflective essay.

Advanced Mixing Techniques (MSR4365.01)

This course will offer an advanced study in studio practices. We will explore various mixing objectives and techniques through critical listening sessions, analysis, and hands-on projects. We will focus on the fundamentals as well as advanced practices of mixing, shaping the sounds through dynamic range processors and modulation tools, and various other techniques. Students will have an opportunity to practice their mixing skills through multitracks, make their own creative remixes, and share their work in-class with their peers for feedback. This course is for students who have previous experience in recording studio practices and/or with preexisting projects.

Spatial Audio Practices (MSR4051.01)

This course will offer an introduction to the principles of spatial audio and its function in creative sound practices. The topics will include multichannel audio, Ambisonics and binaural sound, 360 spatial audio recording and mixing, sound design for VR, and immersive electroacoustic music. Along with readings and discussions, we will look at various current sound practices that explore the possibilities of spatial audio. There will be an emphasis on production and experiential learning through exercises and workshops. This course is for students who have previous experience in sound recording practices and/or e-music.

Intermedia Performance (MPF4225.01)

In this course, we will focus on hybrid practices and explore various forms of intermedia art such as video/audio mashups, audiovisual performance and installation, movement for the camera, and sound and video for movement. The readings and discussions will give an introduction to the intermedia art practice as well as the history of early audiovisual tools, theories on audiovisual perception, video as an intermedium, and aesthetics of collage. The emphasis will be on hands-on practice: students will be encouraged to work with found/archival footage, video camera and projection techniques, sound recordings and audio transducers, as well as learn how to design their performative setups.

Unique Prints: 3-D Prints and Modular Works (PRI4272.01)

This course is an introduction to unique prints, or prints that are not necessarily printed as an edition. We will emphasize the making of mixed media prints using a broad range of methods from monotypes to digital prints. The class is structured around a series of projects where rigorous experimentation is encouraged.

Students will learn various non-typical printmaking methods through a straightforward format of demonstrations of techniques, hands-on experience, and critiques. Techniques will include monotype, polyester laser plates, and various transfer techniques. Additionally, we will explore the possibilities of 3-dimentional applications for prints. This can include anything from books, paper cups, matchbooks, modular installations, appropriated prints and wallpapers. We may also be collaborating on projects with other classes or universities.

Jazz Ensemble (MPF4250.01)

This ensemble will perform a wide range of Jazz music (a genre that is constantly evolving), with an emphasis on both ensemble playing and improvisation skills. By playing together, students will learn how blues, swing, Latin, and rock elements have all fueled this music called jazz. Students will also learn how major Jazz artists such as Ellington, Monk, Mingus, Wayne Shorter, Ornette Coleman and others have approached composition. As a group we will explore different techniques for playing over chord changes and ways to make improvised solos more interesting, both harmonically and rhythmically. Whether playing a jazz standard, a student composition, or free music, the emphasis will be on listening and on interacting with each other, finding ways to create blend, groove, dynamic contrast, and tension/release. Students will also be encouraged to bring in arrangements, transcriptions, and compositions, which will be read and developed by the ensemble. Students need to have adequate technique on a musical instrument, be able to read music and have a basic understanding of harmony (chord structures, chord-scales, etc.)

Abstract Algebra (MAT4144.01)

This course will be organized around two main themes. One will be the analysis of symmetries, in particular the symmetries of tiling patterns and crystals. The other will be classical polynomial algebra, in particular the analysis of the extent to which polynomial equations may be solved explicitly (and what that means). The relevant mathematical topics are what are known as group theory and Galois theory. Our treatment of group theory will be fairly abstract, while the treatment of polynomial algebra and Galois theory will be very concrete, classical, and historically motivated.

Linear Algebra (MAT4115.01)

Together with calculus, linear algebra is one of the foundations of higher level mathematics and its applications. This course is necessary for students concentrating in mathematics, is strongly recommended for students intending to study computer science, physics, or geology, and may be useful for students in economics or biology. This course is a prerequisite for Multivariable Calculus and Electromagnetism. There are several perspectives one can take on linear algebra: it is a method for handling large systems of equations, it is a theory of higher dimensional geometry, and it is a theoretical construct that appears throughout mathematics and physics, among other things. Applications of linear algebra, (some of which will be covered in the class), include correlation coefficients and linear regression in statistics, finite element methods in physics and engineering, interaction networks and clade analysis in biology, and google page rank, error-correcting, and data compression in computing. The course will also set students up for more advanced applications in quantum mechanics, fourier analysis, and number theory.

Fiddle (MIN4327.01)

For the experienced (2+years of playing) violinist. Lessons in traditional styles of fiddling – Quebecois, New England, Southern Appalachian, Cajun, Irish, and Scottish. This tutorial is designed to heighten awareness of the variety of ways the violin is played regionally and socially in North America (and indeed around the world these days) and to give practical music skills for furthering personal music making. Students will be expected to perform at Music Workshop, or as part of a concert, in ensemble and/or solo.

Traditional Music Ensemble (MPF4221.01)

We will study and perform from the string band traditions of rural America. Nova Scotia, Quebecois, Irish, New England, Scandinavian, African American dance and ballad traditions will also be experienced with listening, practice (weekly group rehearsals outside of class), and performing components. Emphasis on ensemble intuition, playing by ear, and lifetime personal music making skills (transposition, harmonizing, etc.). Previous playing experience required on one or more of the following instruments: violin, guitar, banjo, mandolin, bass accordion, concertina, penny whistle, flute, bodhran, harp, ukulele, or piano. Students must have three to five years of instrument playing experience, and must have their own instrument or arrange for instrument use per term.

Protein Research Methods (BIO4109.01)

Research questions in cell biology and biochemistry often require the ability to study the proteins at the heart of the inquiry. This course will give students hands-on experience with techniques for quantifying proteins, detecting protein expression, assessing protein-protein interactions, purifying proteins, and visualizing fluorescently-labeled proteins in vivo. Additionally, students will read and present primary literature articles that utilize protein-based methodologies to address biological questions.

English Restoration and 18th Century Drama (LIT4240.01)

This class will explore English drama of the Restoration and 18th century, with a focus on the structure and conventions of the comedy of manners. During the Restoration, the cavaliers of Charles II’s court promoted an ethos of sophisticated debauchery, fueled by the Hobbesian social currency of wit and power. Within this world of masks, mirrors, and modes, playwrights—including “female wits” such as Aphra Behn—both celebrated and skewered the artifices of their society, while creating daring roles for the women newly permitted to appear on the English stage. We will explore how playwrights, in works ranging from The Country Wife to She Stoops to Conquer, utilized an array of narrative and linguistic devices to reflect themes of deception and disguise. This bawdy arsenal of wit included repartee, epigrams and double entendres; direct address and audience asides; stock characters such as the rake and the fop; and the plot ‘stratagems’ of beaux and belles alike. Encompassing plays by Wycherley, Etherege, Vanbrugh, Congreve, Behn, Pix, Farquhar, Centlivre, Goldsmith, Cowley, and Sheridan, the class will also place the comedy of manners in comparative context with other Restoration and 18th century forms, including the comedy of intrigues, heroic drama, and cross currents in opera seria and ballad opera.

Language and Society in Vermont and its Neighbors (LIN4102.01)

The purpose of this course is twofold: first, to immerse students in the (perhaps surprisingly) rich linguistic setting of Vermont and its immediate neighbors, and, second, to introduce them to the basic methodologies of field research in sociolinguistics and related disciplines.  Thematically, the course will consider language diversity at three different scales.  We will begin by examining the numerous languages used both presently and historically in Vermont, New York, Quebec and the New England states, and will progress to study aspects of linguistic variation between members the region’s wide community of English users.  Third, we will also become familiar with patterns of variability within the speech of individual Vermonters as they adapt to new situations, topics, and interlocutors.  Throughout this process, we will especially highlight questions of language access and language equity, and students will continually work to better understand their own positionality and agentivity regarding such issues at individual and societal levels.

In addition to the above, students will also be introduced to essential principles of experimental design in language research, the specific practice of the sociolinguistic interview, and modes of qualitative and quantitative analysis in the study of naturalistic language data.  These skills will be applied in the form of a collaborative class field project addressing questions of sociolinguistic behavior in the Bennington community.

Bennington Plays (DRA4151.01)

This project-based class is for directors and actors engaged in the process and techniques of analyzing, exploring, and staging (original) works of theater. “Teams” of Director & Cast work in collaboration with corresponding courses for student playwrights and designers whose work has been chosen for participation in the Bennington Plays Festival. Directors will be chosen through a proposal / vetting process. Actors will be cast through audition. Projects will have a preferred running time somewhere between 20 -50 minutes.

In a laboratory atmosphere we will investigate the process of realizing a text’s dramatic potential and nurturing that potential through the use of various analysis and rehearsal techniques, designed to help bring a new play to life. Particular attention will be placed on developing strong skills of communication which allow for a vibrant collaboration between the actors and director, with the playwright as they continue to refine and develop their emergent scripts, and with the design team as they realize for the first time the world of this new play.

Jennifer Rohn, Dina Janis
TBA
This course is categorized as All courses, Drama.

The Art of Literary Translation (LIT4319.01)

It may well be that the closest, most interpretative, and creative reading of a text involves translating it from one language to another. Questions of place, culture, epoch, voice, gender, and rhythm take on new urgency, helping us to deepen our writerly skills and sensibilities. As Joseph Brodsky put it: “You must memorize poems, do translation, study foreign languages. And the best way to study a foreign language…is by translating a poem…The music of the poem carries you, you float upon waves of sound, but, at the same time, you peer below the surface of the ocean, and there, in the depths, you notice the teeming life of sea creatures…”

Writers in all genres are welcome to explore this “teeming life” that is the fruit of literary translation. Our workshop has a triple focus: comparing and contrasting existing translations of the same work; reading translators on the art and theory of translation; and critiquing students’ translations-in-progress. We will also consider translation as an act of bearing witness to cultural and political crisis, and as a means of encoding messages that would otherwise be censored.

For a final project, you will have two options: an extended critical study or an original translation (poetry, prose, drama) accompanied by an introduction. There will also be weekly reading assignments and research presentations.

The Invention of the 19th Century: A seminar on Honoré de Balzac (LIT4329.01)

Oscar Wilde liked to say that Honoré de Balzac (1799-1850) invented the 19th century. The Human Comedy (La Comédie Humaine) comprises approximately 3,000 characters in a total of 92 novels, sketches, stories, and philosophical tales. For the first time in the history of the novel, characters recur—a star of one book may reappear as a minor figure in the intricate social background of another. “Real life is the life of causes,” wrote this giant of world literature. What does Balzac mean by a cause? It is an idea, a dream, an obsession, a project demanding strategies and conspiracies, lingos and lies, histories and myths. Balzac has been called “a nocturnal Homer,” haunting the theatres, bars, streets, shops, and businesses in the Paris and provinces of his day. “I have learnt more from Balzac than from all the professional historians, economists and statisticians put together,” wrote Marxist theoriest Friedrich Engels. A master at rendering the visible world, Balzac was also obsessed with portraying the hidden desires, ambitions, and yearnings of a society in the throes of tectonic change. The Comedy, though full of fact, is not chronological, causing contemporary critics to liken it to a “mobile,” pre-figuring the narrative experiments of the 20th century.

Psychology of Creativity: Making and Using Metaphors (PSY4226.01)

This course will address two large areas in the psychology of creativity: (1) special creativity, that is, the study of creative persons and the specific characteristics of high-level creative thinkers. We will look at how creativity is measured, what personal characteristics or life circumstances seem to foster creative achievement, and the contributions of history in making decisions about who is creative and who is not. (2) general creativity, or the ordinary experience of creativity in everyday life. We will look at metaphoric and figurative language, how it is used and understood, and other experiences of normal creative leaps made by all human thinkers.

Songs in the key of Wonder (MTH4148.01)

Songs in the key of Wonder is a songwriting seminar based on the classic 1976 release, Songs in the Key of Life, by Stevie Wonder. Students will look at select discography and learn the chord progressions that Mr. Wonder used in writing this landmark album, in addition to his multiple hit songs. We will dissect and understand the music by using theory, form and analysis, and arranging that he used in his recordings and performances. By the second half of the term students will use these progressions to create and arrange their own original songs and compositions. We will also look at other contemporary artists influenced by Mr. Wonder’s style such as, Prince, Michael Jackson, D’Angelo, Musiq Soulchild, Erykah Badu, and Janelle Monáe to name a few.

Bebop, Rock & Beyond II (MIN4226.01)

Bebop, Rock & Beyond II is a drum set course that will continue to build on the musical techniques associated with cutting edge drummers while expanding your musicianship and performing abilities. We will continue to look at the drumming architects of Bebop, Rock, and innovative musicians who are taking drum set playing Beyond the traditions of rock and jazz. This course is for drummers who have taken drum set lessons, practice regularly, and are looking to learn and fine-tune their fundamentals in these musical styles on this instrument. We will continue to work on music notation, analyzing specific work, and learning specific pieces. We will use audio, video, and technology to broaden and enhance our learning experience while understanding tuning and what it takes to maintain acoustic drums. This course requires the successful passing of Bebop, Rock & Beyond I or approval from the instructor.

Failure (CS4129.01)

Why do systems fail? How do we determine what went wrong? How do we learn from failure to build better systems and prevent similar problems from occurring in the future? In this course we will examine a variety of ways that software and hardware systems can fail, their causes, impacts and (where applicable) remediation. We will learn about tools and techniques that can be used to debug, analyze and simulate failures, and will conduct a series of experiments where we will observe various forms of failure. The course, its content and direction will be, to some extent, determined by participants’ skills and interests.

Cello (MIN4355.01)

Studio instruction in cello. There will be an emphasis on creating and working towards an end-of-term performance for each student. Students must have had at least three years of cello study.

Corequisites: Music Workshop attendance 7 times per term.

Future Studio (VA4207.01)

Future Studio is a creative incubator designed for the development and articulation of new enterprises that value workers, local communities, sustainability, and the environment equally with profit. The course is designed to lay the foundation for building new enterprise of all types through the unique integration of creativity, arts & culture, and business competencies.

Modeled after the Bennington Plan, which is inherently entrepreneurial, Future Studio engages business as an artistic space that marries inquiry-based idea development, artistic social and civic practice, iterative design, and new business models to generate constructive social outcomes.

We will examine the history of artists and innovative entrepreneurs who have developed organizations and enterprises that break from extractive business models and, instead, integrate creativity and sustainable economic development. The course applies a segmented learning model which utilizes a recursive process of collaboration and active learning, while building capacities in areas such as finance, legal structure, and enterprise modeling.

Future Studio emphasizes creativity, innovation, place-centered economies, worker-centered ownership, environmental sustainability, social justice and financial viability. The goal is to develop ideas that may lead to the creation of new ventures which can be launched as viable enterprises with powerful economic potential and socially responsible missions.

Students who are interested in rethinking what it means to be in business today, possess an interest in the promise of creative enterprise and have skills and knowledge from diverse discipline areas are strongly encouraged to enroll. You do not need to be a visual arts student to meaningfully participate in this course.

How to Think Like a Data Scientist (CS4115.01)

This class will cover the methods used to gather, clean, normalize, visualize, and analyze quantitative data to inform decision making in multiple fields of study. We will use spreadsheets, SQL and Python to work on real-world datasets using a combination of procedural and basic machine-learning algorithms. Students will also learn to ask good, exploratory questions and develop metrics to come up with a well thought-out analysis through work on collaborative, practical projects.

Finding Form: Dance (DAN4319.01)

Looking at forms found in nature, architecture, music, drama, literature, etc., we search for examples to help formulate ideas and structures for movement-based creation. When making new artwork, we are constantly balancing and integrating the need for exploratory freedom and the desire for structural integrity.  How do we use spontaneous impulse to help find form, and how do we use form to help find yet more unexpected solutions? How might we find an essential core that supports an investigation? How might we challenge and rigorously expand our ideas regarding form, and find ways to re-form?

Students are expected to make new movement material, develop work outside of class, teach some of the work to others, and, in return, learn material from others. They will show their compositional studies regularly, write about many aspects involved in their working processes, and draw (while observing others and while working in their own studio practices). Projects will be performed/presented in studio showings or dance workshops. Students of intermediate/advanced level in the performing and/or visual arts are welcome.

Participation in Dance Workshop  (Th 6:30-7:50 pm) is highly recommended.

Co-requisites: Dance or Drama lab

Design Patterns and Data Structures (CS4106.01)

In this class, students will learn common patterns used to solve problems found in software, and gain a deeper knowledge about common ways that data is stored and accessed. Students will learn about the design and implementation of data structures, including inked lists, stacks, queues, and trees. Students will also study common algorithms used to populate and query these data structures. Students will learn how to compare both the computational and memory efficiency of different algorithms and data structures, and will leave the class with a clear understanding of how and when to use each one.

Directing I: The Director’s Vision (DRA4332.01)

What is action? What is character? What are gesture, timing, rhythm and stakes? How do actors, playwrights, and directors collaborate to create an experience in space and time? This seminar offers young theater artists the chance to examine the craft from the inside out.

Throughout the course everyone participates in all exercises and assignments. Non-writers make up stories, non-actors act, and those who have never directed direct. We begin by exploring the energy in the body, focusing on stillness and release, and the body in relationship to space. We continue with physical exercises from both the eastern and western traditions leading into improvisation as a method for tapping the source of impulses. We touch on the Viewpoints as a tool for creating kinetic compositions spontaneously in space. In the text analysis section, we study the expression of action through structure, imagery, dialogue, and the importance of “events.” By mid-term, everyone directs a short scene from one Chekhov play, or another play of our choosing. In the second half of the term, students choose one contemporary play from which they will direct individual scenes. Directors and actors will work together to rehearse, design, and present a public performance of the play.

100 Experiments (PHO4131.01)

This course is a hands-on exploration of the many photographic materials spanning the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries. Over the term, students will study ten specific processes and be asked to create ten 8×10 inch experiments utilizing each one. Processes include camera lucida drawings, pinhole images, cyanotypes, analog color negatives, Polaroid images, scanograms, digital infrared capture, among others. Historical and contemporary practitioners will be introduced as well as relevant readings.

Interested students must have completed the Photo Foundations and preferably one additional studio photography class.

Observations: Photography and the Environment (PHO4113.01)

This class explores the many ways photographers have shifted our understanding of the global environment, from documentary projects to collaborative interventions completed over the past 50 years. In addition to studying the works of Ansel Adams, Robert Adams, Mary Mattingly, Trevor Paglen, there will be assigned readings by Elizabeth Kolbert and John McPhee. Students will also learn how to use the school’s digital and analog cameras to observe the man-altered landscape of this region of North America. Field trips scheduled throughout the term for a full day of shooting on four Wednesdays, 10am – 4PM.

Women in Science: Ancient Greece to Enlightenment (HIS4110.01)

Long before the existence of a discipline we would recognize as “science,” there were women working with men in the pursuit of “scientia”. Scientia embraced a mixture of philosophy, medicine, religion, literature, and knowledge of the natural world – a mixture that would eventually devolve into the separate disciplines we know today. But who were these ancient Greek female philosophers, these medieval “doctoresses,” and these Enlightenment lady astronomers? How was it that they were so celebrated in their lifetimes, and yet they are so completely obscure today? What does that say about our understanding of the discourse and practice of “gender,” or — perhaps more importantly – our understanding of what we now deem to be the nature of scientific knowledge?

Simultaneous Occupancies (ARC4239.01)

This class will investigate architectural projects that posit simultaneous programs contained within a single envelope. We will look at various conditions under which varying, and even divergent interests are pursued by the building and its occupants, including the haunted house, the safe house, the “front”, and similar conditions where one use conceals or overlies another.

Studio projects will focus on the exploration and development of other conditions where this topology may be employed to create new opportunities for simultaneous occupancy. Spaces will be created to contain these programs in a way that explores how their parallel existences are imprinted on one another.

Distributed Systems (with Lab) (CS4280.01)

In this class, we will, as a group, build a working distributed system from scratch, such as a web search engine, distributed file system, blockchain/distributed ledger, or peer-to-peer network. By building such a system, students will learn about key theoretical and practical fundamentals related to distributed systems and software engineering, such as concurrency, replication, commit models, fault-expectancy, self-organization and management, load-balancing, capacity planning, network programming, containerization and microservices, and physical and environmental considerations. These key principles are what lie at the core of the designs of well-known systems such as those built by Google, Bing, Facebook, Yahoo, Twitter and others. The class will evolve from reading and discussing research and working on foundational programming projects, to working through the design of the system, developing it, planning its deployment, and releasing it into the wild. Includes lab.

Painterly Painters & Portraiture (AH4122.01)

According to art historical tradition, “painterly painters” are those whose work exhibits a gestural, often loose, facture that makes the viewer conscious of its painted quality through visible brushwork, inchoate, haptic, blotches and sometimes, heavy impasto. Portraits, like painterly painting, are thought to be largely concerned with fixing or situating individuality, particularity, figuration v. abstraction, and even identity construction, subjectivity, and self-awareness. Together this range of concerns will structure a selective study of the portrait painters (who should be) best known for their virtuosic coloring and painterliness including, but not limited to: Titian, Rubens, Van Dyck, Velázquez, Ribera, Reynolds, Carriera, Boucher, Goya, Manet, Sargent, Bacon, Guston, Rauschenberg, Whitten, Lewis, Basquiat, Saville, Richter, Simpson, Odutola, etc. Race, gender, nationalism, and close looking anchor our exploration.

Queer Renaissance (AH4114.01)

A developmental, periodizing, and heteronormatively inflected approach to idiosyncratic male artist-geniuses such as Michelangelo, Leonardo, Raphael, and Titian has dominated Renaissance art history. Yet given its cross-cultural, colonial origins, and paradoxical investment in both ‘pagan’ antiquity and Christian humanism, ‘pre-modern’ Renaissance visuality is anything but straightforward. In this circumscribed survey of sixteenth-century art, we will read scholarship invigorated by queer theory, feminist, post-colonial, and gender studies as well as primary sources by pioneering art historians and queer art writers, e.g. Vernon Lee and Walter Pater.

Class discussions and independent research will culminate in a research project and short presentation.

Differential Equations and Non-linear Dynamical Systems (MAT4108.01)

Differential equations are a powerful and pervasive mathematical tool in the sciences and are fundamental in pure mathematics as well. Almost every system whose components interact continuously over time can be modeled by a differential equation, and differential equation models and analyses of these systems are common in the literature in many fields including physics, ecology, biology, astronomy, and economics. For example, the following can all be modeled as a system of differential equations: planets, stars, electric circuits, predator and prey populations, epidemics, and economics. We will start by studying the classical theory of ordinary differential equations then will develop dynamical systems approaches to understanding more complex non-linear systems. The goal throughout the course will be to better understand the behavior of the system being studied.

Visual Arts Lecture Series Seminar (VA4218.01)

This discussion-animated, readings-based seminar provides art historical, cultural, and critical contexts for the Visual Arts Lecture Series (VALS). In addition to our ongoing interrogation of the public lecture as such, students present their own work (in any field) and analyze the technical and stylistic aspects of structuring an effective and engaging ‘talk.’ The course provides unique opportunities for interaction with visiting artists, curators, critics, and historians. Consistent participation and a formal presentation of work/research is required, as are visits to local and regional museums and archives. Please note: Students taking the seminar will not need to register for, and will not receive separate credit for VALS. However, attendance at all VALS lectures is a requirement of the course.

Reading Marx (PHI4106.01)

Marx’s ideas remain an important source of political and social science thought. This class requires students to engage in a close and critical reading of a number of Marx’s essays and to assess his work in the light of critical philosophical responses.

The Human Condition: Hannah Arendt (PHI4101.01)

Hannah Arendt (1906-1975) was a major political theorist whose work has become increasingly influential in recent years. A student of Martin Heidegger and Karl Jaspers, her extensive writings cover such topics as the nature of power, the meaning of the political, and the problem of totalitariansim. This course is a critical exploration of some of her major works, including The Origins of Totalitariansim, The Human Condition, and Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil, as well as a assessment of the critical response to her work.

Traces, Mistakes, and Leftovers (DRW4237.01)

The role of drawing has changed over the history of art, from primitive recording to preliminary sketch, from documentation to works that function independently. How can we expand these notions to include the remnants of the making process. Can the research done before a project, the many mistakes made in process, or the discards left after completion of an artwork be considered acts of drawing? What happens in the moments when we think we aren’t working? Can we analyze our interactions with the world that lead to a certain way of making things? What is the necessity or value of ruins?

In this course students collect, analyze, and employ the physical and conceptual detritus surrounding their making process. Topics include: idea generation and development, the use of memory, teaching and learning, and drawing as a way of thinking. In-class activities and discussions are complemented by readings, writings, and the production of an individual body of work, including an elaborate commonplace book. Students are expected to be engaged in a concurrent 4000 level studio/making course.

Mary Lum
M 1:40-5:20 (first seven weeks)
This course is categorized as All courses, Drawing.

Visible Language: Word And/As Image (DRW4401.01)

The observed world is covered with words, both visible and invisible. This advanced drawing course aims to underline the tensions and comforts of the relationship between words and images in visual art. Through assigned drawing problems that call upon students to complete and present visual work regularly, topics will include, sign and structure, letter formation and typography, concrete poetry, found language, illustration, and sequential imagery. An historical context of visible language will be presented, with special attention to the use of words in contemporary art. Students are expected to be able to think abstractly, and to consider reading and drawing important parts of their daily life. Class structure includes in class work, out of class assignments, independent work, readings, discussions and critiques. A high level of self-motivation is expected.

Meisner Technique (DRA4268.01)

“If you are really doing it, you don’t have time to watch yourself doing it.” Sanford Meisner was an actor and founding member of the Group Theater. He went on to become a master teacher of acting who sought to give students an organized approach to the creation of truthful behavior on stage within the imaginary circumstances of a play. This class focuses on developing an actor’s ability to listen, follow their impulses, trust their instincts, and work from moment to moment off of an acting partner. We will explore repetition, independent activities, emotional preparation and text work. The class will require extensive out-of-class preparation, with a minimum of six hours a week for rehearsals and the crafting of exercises. In addition we will be reading Eleonora Duse’s biography, A Mystic in the Theater.

Corequisites: Dance and Drama Lab assignment

Bass Intensive (MIN4026.01)

Advanced studies in theory relating to performance.

Students must be enrolled in Bass with Bisio (MIN4417) simultaneously, no exceptions. This class is only for advanced students and by permission of instructor.

Patternmaking and Garment Construction (DRA4119.01)

This course is designed to teach the student the many steps involved in creating a finished garment from a simple idea, piece of research or sketch. Students will learn the basics of draping, flat patterning, and fitting. Construction of final garment will allow them to explore and employ sewing skills beyond the fundamentals.

Film Adaptations of French Literature (FRE2105.01)

Since the very beginnings of cinema, French literature and film have reciprocally inspired one another. From the Surrealists to the New French Extremity movement, many directors have brought French literary works onto the screen. This course will offer students the opportunity to analyze literature and their film adaptations in terms of intermediality and intertextuality. Adaptations will include: La Princesse de Clèves (La Fayette/Delannoy, Oliveira, Sauder), The Nun (Diderot/Rivette), Madame Bovary (Flaubert/Chabrol), Les Misérables (Hugo/Lumière, Bernard,), La Noire de… (Sembène, Sembène), La Prisonnière (Proust/Akerman). Students will examine a variety of adaptations, focusing on the strategies used to turn a book into a film. Issues of adaptation theory will also be explored, as well as the underlying ideology behind the rediscovery of literary authors through cinema. Students will discuss notions such as “faithfulness” to a source text, the translation of thought, literary and film metaphors, and the different “language” of print text and film. Advanced. Conducted in French.

Corequisites: Language Series

Special Projects in Advanced Japanese (JPN4801.01)

This course is designed for students to research/ complete a project in their field of study/interest. In order to take this course, students are required to write a proposal of their project and be accepted by the instructor.

Corequisites: Language Series

Life and Death: Buddhism in Modern Japanese Films (JPN4401.01)

In this course, students will examine how Buddhism influenced Japanese thought on the after-life and analyze how Japanese views on the relationship between life and death are depicted in recent Japanese films. In the first seven weeks of the course, students will examine and discuss the history, beliefs, and deities of Buddhism and their influences on society. In the second half of the term, students will analyze how death and a common theme, reincarnation, are depicted in different genres of Japanese films such as love stories and fantasy. Throughout the course, students will develop both their linguistic skills and cognitive skills by discussing their understanding of Buddhist beliefs and analyzing Japanese perspectives on death and reincarnation. Individual projects are required. Conducted in Japanese. Intermediate Level.

Corequisites: Language Series

Social Expectations for Japanese Children (JPN4224.01)

This course is designed for students to learn Japanese through Japanese children’s books and animation. In this course, students will read Japanese children’s books and watch Japanese animation that is based on children’s books to examine how Japanese children are expected to behave and communicate with others. Students will also analyze cultural values in Japan, how those cultural values are taught, and how gender differences are depicted in children’s books and animation. Students will continue to develop their skills by interacting in Japanese through stating and supporting their opinions during discussions that focus on narrative texts. Approximately 60 new Kanji will be introduced. As a part of the course, students are required to read/perform Japanese children’s books to children at the Albany Japanese Language School, Schenectady, New York. As the final project of the course, students will write their own children’s book in Japanese. Conducted in Japanese.

Corequisites: Language Series

Art of the Sonnet: Conventions and Inventions (LIT4113.01)

The sonnet, from the Italian sonnetto, or little song, has a long and rich history as a poetic form, described by contemporary poet Laynie Browne as ʺa controlled measure of sound and space within which one can do anything. An invitation.ʺ This course, a literature seminar with a significant creative component, will invite you to study the sonnet in‐depth, both as a traditional form obsessively employed by William Shakespeare and the 14th‐century Italian poet Petrarch, and as an innovative, elastic lyric enjoying a surge in popularity among contemporary writers, some of whom have exploded the form in radical ways. The class will consider the work of such poets as Dante, Petrarch, Shakespeare, Wyatt, Keats, Gerard Manley Hopkins, Claude McKay, John Berryman, Ted Berrigan, Natasha Trethewey, Olena Kalytiak Davis, D.A. Powell, Hannah Sanghee Park, Terrance Hayes, Nikki Wallschlaeger, and Sandra Simonds. Students will write two critical papers, take a midterm exam on form and prosody, recite and memorize two sonnets, and, most weeks, submit for class critique a sonnet of their own.

Corequisite: Students are required to attend all Literature Evenings and Poetry at Bennington events, held most Wednesdays at 7pm.

A Voice from a Wound: Trauma and Memory in Hispanophone Literature (SPA4802.01)

This advanced Spanish course is a study of the paradox of trauma literature. Stories that compel their telling, yet are unassimilated and unspeakable, trauma narratives grow out of disaster and crisis on an individual and/or collective scale. To better understand Anne Whitehead’s assertion that “Novelists have frequently found that the impact of trauma can only adequately be represented by mimicking its forms and symptoms, so that temporality and chronology collapse, and narratives are characterized by repetition and indirection,” we first consider representative fictional narratives by contemporary Spanish authors including Juan Goytisolo, Juan Marsé, and Isaac Rosa Camacho. In order to develop an appropriate theoretical background, students also tackle major contributions by theorists such as Freud, Herman, Caruth, LaCapra, and Whitehead, whose ideas resonate deeply with our primary literary texts. Thereafter, students’ individual research questions will drive content choices, such that, depending on student interests, there will be ample opportunity to consider examples from any time and place in the Hispanophone world. Co-requisite: attendance at 2 language events. In Spanish. Advanced level.

Corequisites: Language Series

Regardez (FRE4496.01)

In this course, students will examine specific visual representations within the context of French culture. Through the reading of a wide variety of French images, including among other works Chartres cathedral’s stained glass, La Tour’s chiaroscuro paintings, Haitian art, as well as virtual reality experiments, students will hone their linguistic skills and enrich their understanding of French, economical, sociological, historical and artistic realities and values. Written assignments and oral presentations will develop students’ level of comprehension, mastery of grammar, in French, as well as their critical skills. Intermediate-high level. Conducted in French.